Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream

Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream is amazingly light and creamy made from a base of Italian meringue and whipped double cream shot through with a burst of fruity blackberry.

Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream

This recipe is an update from the Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream I posted in 2014 which I now make every blackberry season without fail. Because of the base method I do find it an incredibly easy ice cream to manage without the risk of any ice crystals forming. The blackberry ripple is sweet and tart with immense fruity flavour contrasting with the smooth and creamy ice cream.

Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream

I originally adapted the recipe from one of my father’s old Taste Magazines from the 1980s. I love looking through these magazines, it’s amazing how much food photography and writing has changed. There are fewer pictures in the magazines and styling and lighting has changed a lot so much so that the food itself doesn’t look terribly appealing from the photographs. If you look past the dusty images and focus on the recipes themselves though there are some true gems and this ice cream was one of my favourite discoveries.

Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream

This Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream recipe was a bit of a revelation for me in terms of ice cream making. I love homemade ice cream but sometimes I can’t be bothered with the hard-set stuff, the kind that you have to take it out from the freezer for 20 minutes so that you don’t snap your spoon in half desperately trying to dig at it. These 20 minutes are always an endless time of frustration for me. Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream though is proudly soft scoop. If you fancy a teaspoon of ice cream whilst you are waiting for the toast to pop up then this is ideal. Luscious and creamy direct from the freezer. It achieves the soft set by adding liquid glucose to pureed blackberries which helps the crystallisation of the sugar and also protects the fruit, as without the sugar the blackberries would freeze solid. The ice cream base is made by whisking egg whites and drizzling in a sugar syrup to form a fluffy meringue which is what gives the ice cream its texture. Billows of double cream are then folded through, giving the ice cream richness.

Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream

When it comes to the blackberries one of the things I am a bit of a stickler about is the preparation of the fruit. The seeds absolutely have to be removed. If not the smooth creamy ice cream is marred by the rock hard little pellets you have to keep removing from your teeth. I bought a homemade raspberry ice lolly from the market a couple of weeks ago and the seeds were so overwhelming that it completely ruined the treat for me. I was picking them out of my teeth for the rest of the afternoon and complaining about it to anyone unlucky enough to be in my company that day.

Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream

Since I am currently trying to restrict my dairy I have also tried making Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream by switching out the double cream for whipped coconut cream which makes the recipe dairy-free. It worked fine and if you want to make that swap for the same reasons then I do encourage it, it’s still a completely delicious ice cream. However, it’s funny, I haven’t had too hard a time limiting my dairy intake at all and didn’t miss it nearly as much as I thought I would. Ice cream though is proving my downfall. I can certainly be satiated with sorbets and ice creams made from frozen bananas or coconut milk but when you taste this ice cream as it is intended with the whipped double cream then it’s nigh impossible to succumb.

Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream

Print Recipe
Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream
Amazingly light and creamy ice cream shot through with a burst of fruity blackberry.
Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 500 g blackberries
  • 50 g icing sugar
  • 1 tablespoons liquid glucose
  • 250 g light soft brown sugar
  • 4 egg whites
  • 300 ml double cream
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 500 g blackberries
  • 50 g icing sugar
  • 1 tablespoons liquid glucose
  • 250 g light soft brown sugar
  • 4 egg whites
  • 300 ml double cream
Blackberry Ripple Ice Cream
Instructions
  1. Pour the blackberries into a medium sized pan and heat gently with a splash of water to aid the breaking down of the berries. Once the berries have completely softened then remove them from the heat and pour into a sieve. Push the berries through, the best aid for this I think is a silicone spatula, so that all the seeds are extracted from the fruit pulp. Discard the seeds (or save to make a fruit alcohol infusion as explained above) and return the pureed blackberries back into the pan.
  2. Add the icing sugar and liquid glucose to the blackberry puree and bring to the boil. Remove from the heat then leave to cool before covering and refrigerating overnight.
  3. Meanwhile pour the brown sugar into another medium sized saucepan and add 300ml of water. Heat gently so that the sugar completely dissolves into the water. Then bring to the boil and carrying on boiling until it reaches a very thick and syrupy consistency, it should reach 112°C on a sugar thermometer and can take about 20 minutes. You must keep your eye on the saucepan at all times so that it doesn’t bubble over.
  4. In a large mixing bowl whisk up the egg whites until stiff, then drizzle in the sugar syrup in a slow steady steam whilst continuing whisking. The egg whites will turn beautifully glossy.
  5. In a separate bowl lightly whip the double cream then fold into the egg whites until they are fully incorporated. Cover the bowl with cling film and place in the fridge overnight.
  6. The next day pour the egg white and cream mixture into your ice cream machine and churn for about 15 minutes or until the ice cream has reached a thick milkshake consistency.
  7. Finally whilst the mixture is still churning drizzle in the blackberry puree until it has rippled evenly throughout the ice cream. Turn off the ice cream machine then decant the ice cream into tubs and freeze overnight to reach the correct set.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from Taste Magazine, August 1987

Many years ago Luke tried to persuade me than I didn’t need yet another space hogging kitchen gadget that I didn’t use so I bought my ice cream maker on the sly. I honestly haven’t looked back and throughout the summer I keep it constantly in the freezer ready for churning should an ice cream craving set it. I chose the Magimix Le Glacier 1.5 litres on a whim but it’s been absolutely brilliant and was very reasonable so I heartily recommend it.

The image above is an affiliate link which means if you decide you want to use this link to buy your ice cream maker then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. It’s just a way for me to fund my shopping list so if you do click through then many thanks!!

Tequila Lime Ice Cream

This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimal effort. Summer’s here.

This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.

For a time I was convinced my calling was in ice cream. This wasn’t the same time I thought my vocation was to become a chocolatier, although a part of me is still a little frustrated that I didn’t pursue either path. After I quit my job as a TV producer and before I began this blog and my market stall I spent a summer making a lot of ice cream whilst I pondered upon my future.

Most nights I was whipping up a batch of sweet custard or cream whilst I wedged my ice cream bowl into the freezer. In the morning, in my pjs, the first thing I would do would be to churn my efforts. Ice cream for breakfast was pretty normal during that lazy hazy August of 2013. Our freezer was chock-a-block with all manner of flavours.

This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.

My favourite ice cream of this period was definitely David Lebovitz’s Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream which I made all the time. Luke and I would sit on the sofa, a tub of it between us and demolish the lot. I developed my own spin off recipe based on it which is my Butter Mint Ice Cream which is like a frozen creamy murray mint. Truly outstanding.

But I haven’t made ice cream for a while. About two years. It’s funny the things I haven’t done in two years there must be some correlation.

Ice cream is a pastime that needs a bit of pre-planning which I’m currently not so good at. I’m lucky if I have unstained clothes in the morning, bread for toast and the dishwasher was put on overnight. The rest of the day is a blur of fire-fighting. But with ice cream your ice cream base has to be made the day before and the churning bowl needs to be put in the freezer to get to the right temperature before churning.

This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.

I’ve been having cravings lately though. Ice cream tastes so much cleaner and lighter when it’s homemade. But it’s the process of making ice cream which I love and have been longing for. The gentle heating of milk, custard or cream, infused with an infinite possibility of flavour. The anticipation as the mixture cools and then the joy of churning it into actual ice cream as its sweet frostiness permeates the kitchen. The first cheeky taste of the ice cream when it is only just coming together in gentle mounds is a perfect teaspoon. A bowl of ice cream which I made from scratch still feels like such a clever and sophisticated achievement.

The recipe for the base of this Tequila Lime Ice Cream jumped out at me by chance last week when I was leafing through my Kitchenaid cookbook which was a freebie with my Kitchenaid mixer years ago. It’s a bit of a random cookbook but I some of the recipes are nicely put together.

This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.

I had been knocking around with the idea of a Tequila Lime Ice Cream for ages, being a bit wishy washy as to whether I wanted a coconut or banana base. A gelato base would be fabulous, using only whole milk, but so difficult to achieve at home. Then I saw a Lime Ice Cream recipe in the book which used mainly coconut milk and a little bit of double cream. A brilliant idea. So effortless and incredibly effective with no worry of crystallisation due to the healthy fat content. The ice cream is guaranteed to be creamy, no mean feat in a domestic environment.

The ice cream takes fewer than 15 minutes to prepare the day before. I didn’t even bother with the ice bath, often needed to cool the mixture down quickly to prevent crystallisation, but just put it straight into the fridge to chill on its own terms. Then with just 30 minutes of churning the next day the work is complete. The ice cream does need a few hours of setting in the freezer afterwards to achieve the right consistency but it was absolutely no bother.

This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.

The taste of coconut isn’t overpowering as it is tempered by the double cream. It’s completely refreshing but then made even more so by the tantalising zing of lime. The drop of tequila added just at the end of churning is fresh and sparky without calling attention to itself.

This is a great start to ice cream season, I know I’ll be using the base of this recipe again and again and have already commandeered the bottom shelf of our freezer for purely ice cream purposes. It’s like the summer of 2013 all over again.

This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.

Print Recipe
Tequila Lime Ice Cream
A refreshingly light and zesty ice cream
This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
1 pint
Ingredients
  • 400 ml coconut milk
  • 200 ml double cream
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • grated zest of 2 limes
  • 60 ml lime juice about 2 limes
  • 2 tablespoons white tequila
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
1 pint
Ingredients
  • 400 ml coconut milk
  • 200 ml double cream
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • grated zest of 2 limes
  • 60 ml lime juice about 2 limes
  • 2 tablespoons white tequila
This Tequila Lime Ice Cream is refreshingly light and zesty. It’s foolproof with just five ingredients and minimum effort.
Instructions
  1. Pour the coconut milk, cream, sugar and lime zest into a medium sized saucepan then slowly heat. Stir occasionally until the sugar has dissolved and bring the mixture just below boiling point.
  2. Remove from the heat then stir in the lime juice. Pour into a bowl, cover and place in the fridge to cool overnight.
  3. The next day pour the creamy mixture into an ice cream maker and churn for 15 minutes.
  4. Pour in the tequila whilst the ice cream is still moving and then continue churning for another 15 minutes until it thickens and becomes the consistency of very soft serve.
  5. Decant the ice cream into a freezer container and put in the freezer to set completely overnight.
Recipe Notes
  • Original recipe adapted from Veerle de Pooter - Kitchenaid: The Cookbook

Many years ago Luke tried to persuade me than I didn’t need yet another space hogging kitchen gadget that I didn’t use so I bought my ice cream maker on the sly. I honestly haven’t looked back and have been thrilled to reach down for it again and put it back to use. I chose the Magimix Le Glacier 1.5 litres on a whim but it’s been absolutely brilliant and was very reasonable so I heartily recommend it.

The image above is an affiliate link which means if you decide you want to use this link to buy your ice cream maker then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. It’s just a way for me to fund my shopping list so if you do click through then many thanks!!

Red Velvet Ice Cream

This Red Velvet Ice Cream takes all the personality of a red velvet cake and rockets it into summer. Velvety, tangy with plenty of cocoa kick.

Red Velvet Ice Cream

I first tried red velvet ice cream a couple of years ago at Taste of London. It was definitely one of the most popular desserts of the day as everywhere you looked people were clutching at cones stacked high with beautifully scarlet ice cream. I don’t know what it is about red food but it just looks terrifically inviting and we immediately scouted out where people were getting their ice creams from and joined the long long queue to get our own cones. It’s just as well that I can’t remember which restaurant was offering this ice cream as when we first took our first licks it was incredibly disappointing. Stunningly tasteless.

There are a few people who will probably shrug at this as red velvet cakes often seem to be more pomp than circumstance, relying on the food colouring for effect and the only taste really deriving from the cream cheese icing that always adorns them. However, I heartily disagree for I feel that red velvet cake is one of the most subtly complex cakes, blessed with the richness of cocoa, a hint of vanilla and light and tangy with the buttermilk. If you think the cake is tasteless then you are getting your red velvets from the wrong source my friend.

So, I was thinking about this bland red velvet ice cream, and how unfortunate it is when the taste of something doesn’t marry with the beauty of it. It’s been nagging at me for a while and I have been keen to improve my experience of red velvet ice cream and give it a go myself.

So I eventually arrived at this recipe after a lot of failed attempts and can decree that this ice cream really is what red velvet ice cream should taste like. It has a creamy custard base but the quantity of buttermilk used gives the ice cream such a delicately bright flavour. However, it’s not the overriding element and the vanilla and chocolately background gives the ice cream depth and its incredible moreishness.

This ice cream is just wonderful by itself and the glorious ruby of it will pair beautifully with the colours of the season. You are taking the ice cream into another dimension though if you think of serving it with a good wodge of chocolate fudge cake, the ice cream will cut through the richness and I swear will leave you floundering for words.

Print Recipe
Red Velvet Ice Cream
This Red Velvet Ice Cream takes all the personality of a red velvet cake and rockets it into summer. Velvety, tangy with plenty of cocoa kick.
Red Velvet Ice Cream
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 8 hours
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 250 g caster sugar
  • 450 ml double cream
  • 250 ml whole milk
  • 35 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • tablespoons red food colouring
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 300 ml buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 8 hours
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 250 g caster sugar
  • 450 ml double cream
  • 250 ml whole milk
  • 35 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • tablespoons red food colouring
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 300 ml buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
Red Velvet Ice Cream
Instructions
  1. Heat the caster sugar, double cream and cocoa powder in a large saucepan and bring to boil. Make sure the cocoa has completely dissolved then remove from the heat.
  2. Add the vanilla extract and food colouring.
  3. Whisk the egg yolks in a large bowl until thick, then pour in the red velvet mixture in a thin stream, whisking all the while until everything has been mixed together.
  4. Pour the red custard into a bain marie, then re-heat. Bring the custard up to 85°C but do not boil.
  5. As soon as it has reached the correct temperature, pour the custard into a bowl set into an ice bath and carry on whisking until the custard cools.
  6. Strain the custard into a large jug and set cling film over the surface to avoid a skin forming. Place in the fridge overnight to chill.
  7. The next day remove the custard from the fridge and add the buttermilk and lemon juice. Pour into your ice cream machine and churn for 20 minutes until the ice cream is a thick milkshake consistency.
  8. Decant into tubs and place in the fridge overnight to finish the set.

Raspberry and Oreo Ice Cream

Raspberry Oreo Ice Cream
I am more than happy to admit my failures and my faults – I have many and I embrace them all. This ice cream is like the opposite of that.

When I make something I am really proud of it reminds me why I started blogging in the first place. It would be simply criminal not to share this ice cream with the world. My favourite of all my recipes is always the one I last blogged about which is why I’m probably always touting my latest effort as the best I have ever done. So feel free to take it with a pinch of salt when I say that this ice cream is the best ice cream in the world ever hands down. That includes the insane rosemary honey gelato I had a couple of weeks ago at Broadway Market which led to some horrible attempts to recreate it in my own kitchen immediately when I got home. I’m sure I’ll get there with my gelato recipes one day but I know for certain I can make ice cream and this one seals the deal.

Raspberry Oreo Ice Cream  |  Stroud Green Larder

I thoroughly enjoy making ice cream, not just the process of it which can be immensely relaxing as I have written about before but I love the fact that you can store it in the freezer. There is no immediacy with the finished product; like when I’m trying to palm off half a cake to the UPS delivery man before it goes stale or handing out hot scones that I will never get round to eating to unsuspecting neighbourhood kids who just want to know if I would like my car washed. Although there was that one time when we had to emergency defrost the freezer and we were passing out half eaten tubs of homemade lemon and chocolate brownie ice cream down our street. However, I made this raspberry and Oreo ice cream this week and the urgency of eating it suddenly became clear. If I did not eat it, someone else would and that would be really uncool.

Raspberry Oreo Ice Cream  |  Stroud Green Larder

If you read my recipes carefully then you will see the base of this recipe is very similar to my Blackberries and Cream ice cream, it has become my favourite method of ice cream recently. The set is soft and the sharp berry flavour is intensified without the addition of an egg based custard. It’s so fresh tasting and contrasts beautifully with the homeliness of the Oreos.

Raspberry Oreo Ice Cream
Makes about 2 pints

500g raspberries
50g icing sugar
1 tbsp liquid glucose
250g caster sugar
4 egg whites
300ml double cream
154g packet of Oreos

  1. Pour the raspberries into a medium sized pan and heat gently with a splash of water to aid the breaking down of the berries. Once the berries have completely softened then remove them from the heat and pour into a sieve. Push the berries through, the best aid for this I think is a silicone spatula, so that all the seeds are extracted from the fruit pulp. Discard the seeds (or save to make a fruit alcohol infusion as explained above) and return the pureed raspberries back into the pan.
  2. Add the icing sugar and liquid glucose to the raspberry puree and bring to the boil. Remove from the heat then leave to cool before covering and refrigerating overnight.
  3. Meanwhile pour the sugar into another medium sized saucepan and add 300ml of water. Heat gently so that the sugar completely dissolves into the water. Then bring to the boil and carrying on boiling until it reaches a very thick and syrupy consistency, it should reach 112°C on a sugar thermometer and can take about 20 minutes. You must keep your eye on the saucepan at all times so that it doesn’t bubble over.
  4. In a large mixing bowl whisk up the egg whites until stiff, then drizzle in the sugar syrup in a slow steady steam whilst continuing whisking. The egg whites will turn beautifully glossy.
  5. In a separate bowl lightly whip the double cream then fold into the egg whites until they are fully incorporated. Cover the bowl with cling film and place in the fridge overnight.
  6. The next day pour the egg white and cream mixture into your ice cream machine and start churning. Pour in the raspberry puree immediately whilst the machine is churning and then the puree will mix in evenly.
  7. Meanwhile reserve 4 Oreos for decorating the top but place the rest of the biscuits in a food processor and whizz until they have become breadcrumbs. Chop the reserved 4 Oreos roughly.
  8. Once the ice cream has reached a thick milkshake consistency and is pretty much ready then pour in the crumbed Oreos and churn for a couple of minutes until they have been evenly distributed through the ice cream.
  9. Decant the ice cream into tubs, tucking in the roughly chopped 4 Oreos on the top and then freeze overnight to reach the correct set.

Butter Mint Ice Cream

Butter Mint Ice Cream
My husband is obsessed with car sweets, the kind that come in a metal tin drowned in icing sugar which you can buy from petrol stations.  We always seem to have a smorgasbord of different flavours spilling out of the glove compartment every time you go to retrieve the sat nav.  They are not so bad when they have just been bought, the sweets bounce around happily in the icing sugar, cheerily rattling against the metal.  However, if the sweets have had the misfortune to have endured a sweltering summer stuck in their hot tin, which they inevitably always do, then the icing sugar melts into a glue, clamping the sweets into a concrete ball.  If you are brave enough to tackle them at this stage you will have to prise one from the sickly grasp of its brethren, resulting in sticky fingers and sticky car.

These sweets are not worth the effort in my opinion and if you even succeed in wrestling one from the tin then they are usually so sweet anyway they make your mouth burn.  But I am not one for sweets, it’s sugar for sugar’s sake and I can get much more enjoyment from a biscuit.

Or, mints and toffees, which can hardly be classed as sweets can they?  Mints are refreshing and toffees are too delicious to pigeon hole.  So for obvious reasons when my husband is thoughtfully choosing his travel sweets I help him out by bunging a packet of  Murray Mints down on the counter, the best of both worlds.  They are much more sensible, much more yummy and they are in a packet and not a tin so you don’t get the painful clanging of the sweets bashing around each other as you fly over pot holes.  The only issue is that they are individually wrapped, great for the melting issue but not so great in making the car not look like a dustbin, as wrappers are discarded willy nilly with empty promises that they will be gathered up and thrown away at a later date.

Butter Mint Ice Cream  Stroud Green Larder

Fresh mint ice cream is a biggie in our house and I always take pleasure once a year of making it with the apple mint which we grow in our garden.  For some reason I can usually only make the crop of mint grow once so as soon as I’ve picked it, the herb withers away, only to rally round the next summer in time for my ice cream again.  Apple mint has a slightly furry leaf so you can tell it apart from regular garden mint but you can use either, or a mixture as I sometimes do if I don’t have enough apple mint.  This year I thought I would spruce up my mint ice cream and having had such success with David Lebovitz’s Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream in the past, I couldn’t resist adapting the recipe conjure up the perfect butteriness of a Murray Mint.

The mint nestled into this recipe perfectly, it’s at once refreshing but also comforting and incredibly moreish.  The butter caramel enriches the mint and smoothes out the zingy edges.  It’s also a very reliable recipe, I have made it a few times and it hasn’t once succumbed to icy crystals in the freezer.  It is a softer set ice cream so you don’t have to wait impatiently for the ice cream to come up to scooping temperature.  If you are suffering in this heatwave, you can dive into the freezer and in seconds be sticking a teaspoon straight into the tub with indulgence for the ideal cool down.  If only they could wrap this ice cream up for long summer journeys down the motorway and sell it at petrol stations, then I too would be obsessed with travel sweets.

Butter Mint Ice Cream

Butter Mint Ice Cream
Adapted from David Lebovitz’s Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream
Makes about 2 pints

75g fresh mint leaves, including stalks
350ml double cream
600ml whole milk
300g sugar
60g salted butter
5 egg yolks
¾ tsp vanilla extract

  1. Infuse the fresh mint by pouring the milk and cream into two separate saucepans. Split the mint between the two and heat both until just below boiling point. Leave to cool for a couple of hours, then strain and discard the mint leaves from both saucepans. Measure out 250ml of double cream and 500ml whole milk as those are the quantities you will be working with. If there is any leftover you can save for another use or discard.
  2. Fill your kitchen sink halfway up with water and pour in a lot of ice until freezing. Place a large mixing bowl into the water, so it comes halfway up the sides then pour half of the minted milk into the mixing bowl. Set a sieve over the top.
  3. Spread the sugar in a large saucepan in an even layer. Heat it up until the edges begin to melt, fold it into the centre of the sugar carefully, stirring until it’s all dissolved. Carry on cooking until the caramel begins to smoke then remove from the heat immediately.
  4. Add the butter and a pinch of salt until the butter has melted then stir in the cream. Don’t worry if the caramel seizes as it can melt again at the next stage.
  5. Place back on the heat and stir until all the caramel has melted. Then stir in the second half of the milk gradually.
  6. Whisk the yolks in a bowl, then whisk in some of the warm caramel so the eggs warm up, pour the eggs back into the caramel custard and heat. Stirring all the time until it begins to thicken.
  7. Pour into the sieve set above the rest of the minted milk in the ice bath, add the vanilla extract and then whisk constantly until the temperature has cooled.
  8. Pour the custard into a large jug, cover with cling film and place in the fridge overnight to chill.
  9. The next day churn in your ice cream machine until the consistency of a thick milkshake. Decant into tubs and place in the freezer overnight before serving.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices
These ice creams have been a bit of a passion project of mine for a few weeks. Back when I was doing the Whole30 I was writing this recipe and counting down the days until I could commit to it. Then I finished my Whole30 and kind of got cold feet. It was a recipe which would take a good few days to pull together all the elements and then the last day you have to contend with warm tempered chocolate and cold ice cream without a meltdown.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices  |  Stroud Green Larder

I am prone to kitchen disasters as I like to constantly swim in unchartered waters. I have an excellent baker friend who is known for the most wonderful cakes. She has a few solid recipes which she brings out in rotation whenever I see her. When she presents her cakes they are reliably beautiful and delicious. Her baking abilities are never questioned; if she has any kitchen failures, she keeps them close to her chest and only brings forth her cakes after they have been thoroughly vetted in her test kitchen and she can wow us all with her brilliance.

I, on the other hand, love to try new recipes pretty much every day, I think I must thrive on the danger of disaster. If an occasion is called to bring a cake then I use it as a perfect excuse to try out the new five layer monstrosity I’ve been working on, complete with untested buttercream, flavours and batter method. It’s always a bit of a gamble as the knife goes through the multi-layered extravaganza in front of a hungry audience as to whether it’s cooked all the way through, whether I have added enough buttercream to the layers and if all the flavours work together. So why do I always live in this constant state of panic? For the pure excitement when it does go right.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices  |  Stroud Green Larder

Understandably, after days of prepping these choc ices; infusing the milk with cornflakes for a day, then making the ice cream the next day, then churning the ice cream the day after that, before leaving it overnight for setting in the loaf tin, I was very keen on day four that it would not all come to blows on the assembly line. I would be calm, collected, think through my presentation prior to beginning the chocolate tempering and make sure I have enough lollipop sticks, instead of improvising with cake pop sticks (nope, they are not good enough I have found out in the past).

So I got stage fright. The cornflake ice cream has been waiting patiently in the freezer to be organised into the choc ices for ten days now, fending off after-dinner advances from all members of the household, and generally making me feel like a half job.

Yesterday I bit the bullet and did it. And thank goodness it worked. No tears were shed, no ruined ingredients were thrown in the bin in a childish tantrum and more importantly, I could eat my delicious choc ice that I had invented in the garden after a sweaty day in the kitchen. Pure pleasure. That is what I love about recipe writing, testing and endless research, it’s so satisfying when you get it right. Thanks to the internet I discovered the best way for covering my choc ices in chocolate – filling a good sized jar with the just tempered chocolate and dipping the ice cream sticks in directly from the freezer. As soon as the chocolate touches the ice cream it forms a barrier against melting and the cold ice cream cools the chocolate immediately, also preventing it from melting the ice cream. Sprinkle those bad boys with the crunchy honey peanuts immediately and then lay to rest on baking parchment and place back into the freezer before they can even think about collapsing. This recipe takes time, the only way to finish the choc ices on the assembly line is by taking the cornflake ice cream sticks out of the freezer in batches. You will have to work quickly to ensure the chocolate doesn’t fall out of temper and your ice cream doesn’t fall off their sticks.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices  |  Stroud Green Larder

However, the most important element of this whole recipe is how damn delicious these choc ices are. Cornflake ice cream is a constant presence in our freezer and it is paired deliciously, as I had hoped, with the thick wrapping of milk chocolate and the salty honeyed crunch of peanuts. They are tasty, tasty, very very tasty. They’re very tasty.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices
Makes 8-10 choc ices

1.2lt whole milk
150g cornflakes
600ml double cream
12 egg yolks
180g golden caster sugar
250g natural unsalted peanuts
75g honey
25g light brown sugar
½ tsp salt
800g milk chocolate, tempered

  1. Tip the cornflakes into a large bowl and pour over the milk. Cover with cling film and leave to soak in the fridge overnight.
  2. Strain the milk and discard the soggy cornflakes. You should have achieved about 600ml of cornflake infused milk.
  3. Pour the milk and the cream into a large saucepan and bring to an even boil.
  4. Meanwhile whisk together the egg yolks and caster sugar in a large mixing bowl until they are pale, thick and frothy.
  5. Once the milk and cream have boiled, turn off the heat and very carefully pour into the egg yolks and sugar in a very thin stream whisking it in all the while.
  6. Pour it all into a bain marie set over a pan of simmering water. Bring the cornflake custard up to 70°C, whisking all the while to avoid lumps and curdling.
  7. Remove the bain marie from the heat and plunge the bowl into a sink full of iced water to immediately drop the temperature. Stir the custard until the temperature begins to cool. Remove from the ice bath, cover the surface of the custard with clingfilm to ward off any skin forming then leave to chill in the fridge overnight.
  8. Once the custard is thoroughly chilled then churn in an ice cream machine until it forms a dropping consistency.
  9. Pour the soft set ice cream into a 9 inch loaf tin, cover tightly with cling film and place in the freezer to set overnight.
  10. To make the crunchy honey nuts first spread the peanuts on a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10 minutes at 180°C.
  11. Remove the peanuts from the oven and chop roughly.
  12. Meanwhile boil the honey and sugar with a pinch of salt in a medium saucepan until it reaches a rolling boil, turn down slightly and cook for about 2 minutes until the honey caramel darkens slightly.
  13. Turn off the heat then tip the peanuts into the saucepan. Mix quickly until the peanuts are evenly coated then pour onto baking parchment and leave to harden.
  14. Once the crunchy honey nuts have hardened then chop them roughly.
  15. Remove the ice cream from the freezer and turn the ice cream out of the loaf tin. If this is proving difficult, either run a blow torch around the outside of the tin or carefully run the bottom of the tin under hot water.
  16. Once the ice cream has been removed cut into slices, neatening the edges evenly. Quickly insert the lollipop sticks into the base of the ice cream slices and place on baking parchment lined baking trays then return to the freezer until needed.
  17. At this stage temper the milk chocolate.
  18. Pour the tempered milk chocolate into a jar large enough so you can dunk and fully submerge your ice cream into the jar.
  19. Working very quickly, remove your sticks of ice cream from the freezer in batches, dunk into the jar of chocolate then sprinkle the crunchy honey nuts over. Place the choc ices back onto the baking parchment lined baking trays then back into the freezer to set for at least 2 hours before eating.