Homemade Almond Milk

Homemade Almond Milk is a deliciously creamy alternative to dairy milk. Contrary to popular belief it is quick and easy to make, but do build in that day’s worth of soaking time.

A jug of Homemade Almond Milk next to some almonds

I am not reinventing the wheel with this recipe. In fact I too have posted all about Homemade Almond Milk before, about five years ago, and I was late to the party then. However, I find it necessary to publish this recipe a second time as my first post of 2019 since I rediscovered it when completing my Whole30 back in October and it has become such an important part of my kitchen that I want to remind you about it. I don’t drink dairy milk in my tea and I hadn’t realised how accustomed I had become to the piss poor almond milk you can buy in the supermarket; watery, bland, expensive and full of rubbish ingredients. It has become quite clear to me recently that I am quite intolerant to all the gums added to various supermarket products and I wanted an almond milk that eschewed all those extra nasties. Now, you will not be saving any money here as almonds are expensive, but the joy you will be getting out of this Homemade Almond Milk is a million worlds away to the cartoned stuff you have been putting up with for far too long. It is completely and utterly delicious. Although I talk about using it in my tea a lot here I also use it in my baking and cooking to fantastic effect when I want to mimic single cream.

overview of a jug of Homemade Almond Milk next to some almonds

When I was in my mid-twenties I was unwell a lot, I was missing a lot of time of work and since I had a very busy job as a TV Producer I was really feeling the strain. The days I did go into work I usually felt awful, constantly sick and exhausted with pounding headaches. The doctors tested me for everything but in their eyes I was fit and well. So under the advice of my personal trainer I went to a local kinesiologist to seek a more holistic approach, which was a fun if slightly batty experience. Kinesiology is the study of human movement and a series of simple tests on muscles is believed to determine any imbalances in the body. Since by this time I was fed up of going to the doctors for them merely to shrug and give me further blood tests the holistic approach seemed a welcome relief.

The kinesiologist put various food samples in my hands and tested my muscle response to see if any particular food group was causing an imbalance in my body and by eliminating the incriminating substances from my diet she hoped to determine the cause of my lack of energy and why I was frequently plagued by nausea and headaches. Now the results were not a short list; it turned out I was intolerant to mushrooms (yay, I hate them anyway), beer (ditto), soy (meh), marmite (hmm, I always quite liked marmite), wheat (well, we’ve talked about this a lot) and dairy (noooooo). At the time I was obsessed with crème fraiche, putting it in everything, and I did so love my cups of tea; I couldn’t bear having to give these up.

However, if I thought about it, the dairy thing kind of made sense. As a child I was never able to eat cereal as the milk made my ears pop, like I had lost my centre of gravity, and since taking up the tea habit in my late teens I was never able to drink more than a couple of mugs before getting my patented ‘tea tummy’.

A nut milk bag full of soaked almond meal

The inability to tolerate lactose is more prevalent in human beings than we realise. Most mammals cease to produce lactase after being weaned which means they become intolerant to lactose and although many human beings have developed lactase persistence into adulthood, meaning that they can digest lactose normally, Wikipedia says (so it must be bible) that in 75% of adults lactase activity is decreasing, leading to the intolerance of lactose.

Although I have been able to cut the rest of my intolerances out of my diet very successfully the dairy thing has plagued me off and on for years. However, I have found a happy medium in that in the everyday I avoid as much dairy as I can but in my baking and on special occasions I do allow myself to jump onto the dairy wagon again. This is why you see both dairy and non-dairy recipes on my website.

The one thing I have never really minded about avoiding dairy though is the substitution of almond milk for dairy in my tea. I prefer it. It has a sharper flavour and seems to strengthen the taste of the tea rather than soften it like dairy. Now, the supermarket stuff is fine but Homemade Almond Milk is the real deal; richer, silkier, fresher, more nutty and makes tea (and coffee for you coffee drinkers) feel much more luxurious, exactly as if it had whole dairy milk in it.

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Homemade Almond Milk is so straightforward to make and, although I’m lucky enough to have one, you do not need a Vitamix to make it (although it does make it so much easier) just a decent enough blender. You simply soak the almonds in water for 1-2 days, drain and then blend with fresh water. The milk is produced immediately but you will want to strain it through a nut bag to get rid of all the nitty gritty. Having made homemade nut milks without a nut bag for an awfully long time and then buying a nut bag for under a tenner I have to say that the nut bag is pretty non-negotiable. It makes the process so much easier and less messy.

It’s also worth mentioning though that at the end of the milk making process you will be left with some soaked almond meal in the muslin after straining, I would heartily recommend you turn to my helpful booklet on How to Use Leftover Almond Pulp which has some exclusive recipes and ideas on how you can best use this very useful by-product. The below image is of the simply wonderful Almond Pulp Raw Chocolate Truffles, the recipe for which is included in the booklet.

Almond Pulp Raw Chocolate Truffles

I was thrilled that the Whole30 made me embrace Homemade Almond Milk again and so far three months down the line I still can’t get enough of it. It’s worth noting at this point that Homemade Almond Milk lasts for 3 days in your refrigerator so I make it in smaller batches of 500ml at a time to avoid any wastage.

If you like this recipe then you may like these other dairy-free recipes:

Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffle Torte

Everything But The.. Bircher Museli

Banana Peanut Butter Streusel Muffins

If you make Homemade Almond Milk then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own nut milk creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Homemade Almond Milk

Homemade Almond Milk is a deliciously creamy alternative to dairy milk. Contrary to popular belief it is quick and easy to make, but do build in that day’s worth of soaking time.
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: American, British
Servings: 2 servings
Calories: 431kcal

Ingredients

  • 150 g whole unblanched almonds
  • 500 ml of water plus extra for soaking

Instructions

  • Place your almonds in a medium bowl then pour over enough water so it covers the almonds by an inch.
  • Cover the bowl and leave for 1-2 days for the almonds to soften.
  • Drain and rinse the almonds then place in a blender with 500ml of fresh water. Blend for a minute or two (depending on the strength of your blender) until it’s as smooth as you can get it.
  • Place your nut bag in a large bowl, opening it up as wide as possible.
  • Pour the milk into the nut bag then gather up the ties and close
  • Lift up the nut bag and watch all the clean almond milk drip into your bowl. Squeeze the nut bag to extract as much milk as you can.
  • That’s it. Pour the milk into a sterilised jar and keep in the fridge. Don’t discard the almond pulp but reserve for other recipes*.
  • The almond milk lasts for a 3-4 days.

Nutrition

Calories: 431kcal | Carbohydrates: 16g | Protein: 15g | Fat: 37g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 13mg | Potassium: 528mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 2g | Calcium: 206mg | Iron: 2.8mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

You certainly don’t need a Vitamix blender to make Homemade Almond Milk but oh my goodness did my life change when Luke bought me one for my birthday last year. My Vitamix® Pro750 Food Blender, Copper UK Model is one of my most favourite kitchen appliances and I use it almost daily. This blender is amazing! I loved the Kitchenaid blender I had before but my Vitamix produces the smoothest smoothies, most cohesive sauces and fantastic soups. I have been using it most frequently at the moment for making my nut milks but also my iced matcha lattes and I now could not be without it. Okay, it isn’t cheap but if you have the budget for it and you are looking to be really spoilt then I really recommend it. Plus I love the colour!!

However, as I said above, a nut milk bag is non-negotiable if you really want to get on board the Homemade Almond Milk train. I used to make it in just a muslin cloth with some string and it was a messy affair. My nut milk bag has so much use and it’s not that expensive. I use this Lovetree Products Nut Milk Bag, Professional Filter for Almond, Coconut, Greek Yogurt, Soy Milk, Fruit & Veg Cheesecloth Replacement Reusable Strainer, Strong Nylon Mesh, Inc FREE Recipe E-Book and it does its job perfectly.

Now you may be thinking where you might like to store your Homemade Almond Milk once it’s made. Well, might I recommend this Arc International Luminarc Quadro Fridge Jug with Lid 110cl, 1 Jar. I love it so much and it’s so well priced. It fits in my fridge door and stores then pours the milk perfectly. So useful for so many things but especially Homemade Almond Milk.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

Almond Butter Fudgsicles

These Almond Butter Fudgsicles are an easy vegan, gluten-free and refined sugar-free treat to see us through this heatwave.

overhead shot of Almond Butter Fudgsicles on a wooden board

Like everyone experiencing this massive heatwave we are feeling a little frayed around the edges in our house. We live in a compact railway cottage in North London and at the moment it feels like a hotbox. It seems impossible to get any room cool. All curtains are drawn throughout the day, windows as wide open as can be, extravagantly purchased oscillating tower fans constantly following us around the house. Yet still our bedrooms are measuring 30 degrees at 2am. This is weather I cannot get accustomed to. Hey, I signed up for the drizzly grey weather London is renowned for. I am a firm believer that brollies should be a staple companion and one never leaves the house without the buggy rain cover and a waterproof mac.

overhead shot of Almond Butter Fudgsicles on a wooden board

No such luck at the moment. Our poor bay tree, the only plant I truly love and tend to in our garden has succumbed to the elements and boasts beautifully crisp brown leaves where luscious fragrant green ones used to be. However, the fault probably lies in the fact that I got involved in its wellbeing at all. It’s just as well that old death fingers here had astroturf laid in lieu of a lawn a few years ago so thankfully our fake grass is thriving. Not that sitting out in the garden is an option at the moment. We spend most mornings in the park or local paddling pool and those couple of hours are enough to ensure you don’t venture out for the rest of the day.

overhead shot of Almond Butter Fudgsicles on a wooden board

Anything cold is a godsend in our life at the moment and I’m basically living off iced tea and salads. We are going through bags of ice and cucumber like there is no tomorrow and I’ve really been working on my vinaigrette repertoire to ensure varied meals.

I’m trying to be more mindful in my eating these days, as I’d let laziness creep into my food choices. Turns out oatcakes with almond butter are not a valid meal choice. So when the craving for a popsicle hits both Cole and I (a daily occurrence) then I need to reach for something that aren’t Tangle Twisters. Although I think they are just called Twisters these days, and not nearly as tasty as I remember either, having given into temptation a few weeks back.

overhead shot of Almond Butter Fudgsicles on a wooden board

These Almond Butter Fudgsicles though have been really hitting the spot and so much more satisfying than your average popsicle. Not only are they tremendously easy to bring together, merely requiring 5 minutes, a blender and a popsicle mould. But all of the ingredients, almond butter, coconut milk, maple syrup, chocolate and salted almonds are my larder staples. They might actually all be in my top ten favourite ingredients in the larder so it is no wonder that I have become quite enamoured with these Fudgsicles.

overhead shot of Almond Butter Fudgsicles on a wooden board

I think it tells a great deal about how simple these Almond Butter Fudgsicles are to make if I am getting the blender out a 9pm on a weekday, having only just got the children to sleep after a mammoth two hour settle from hell, dinner yet to be made and an episode of Marvel’s Agents of Shield waiting in the wings.

overhead shot of Almond Butter Fudgsicles on a wooden board

So the fudgsicles themselves are a cinch but even the chocolate almond dip is a five minute job once the fudgsicles are frozen. Dark chocolate melted with coconut oil is a bit of a magical beast, as it freezes immediately into a hard shell as soon as it touches the fudgsicle. Meaning that you pour your coconut chocolate into a tall glass, dip your fudgsicle in and out, and then by the time you are presenting it onto parchment so you can do the next one, the chocolate is practically set. It just leaves you enough time to sprinkle in some crushed salty almonds and then you are done. I’d recommend placing them in the freezer to set nice and hard but that only takes about 10 minutes. Then they are ready for your cool down. Gosh, don’t we need it.

overhead shot of Almond Butter Fudgsicles on a wooden board

Almond Butter Fudgsicles

These Almond Butter Fudgsicles are an easy vegan, gluten-free and refined sugar-free treat to see us through this heatwave.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Servings: 8 fudgsicles
Calories: 288kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 tin coconut milk 400g
  • 100 g drippy almond butter
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 50 ml maple syrup
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 200 g 70% dark vegan chocolate
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons salted almonds roughly chopped

Instructions

  • Pour the coconut milk, almond butter, vanilla extract, maple syrup and salt into a blender and whizz together until smooth.
  • Pour into popsicle moulds, sticking a wooden stick through each one and place in the freezer overnight to set.
  • Remove the fudgsicles from the moulds, running briefly under the hot water tap if they are proving stubborn, and place on a parchment lined baking tray and back into the freezer until ready to dip.
  • Melt the chocolate with the coconut oil in a bain marie or a metal bowl set over simmering water, then once melted pour into a glass.
  • Get your chopped almonds to hand.
  • Remove your fudgsicles from the freezer and dip in and out of the melted chocolate quickly. Place back onto the parchment lined baking tray and sprinkle with the crushed almonds.
  • Repeat with each fudgsicle then place back into the freezer for 10 minutes to set firm. At this point they are ready to eat or you can decant them into a more convenient sized freezer safe container until needed.

Nutrition

Calories: 288kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 22g | Saturated Fat: 9g | Sodium: 79mg | Potassium: 303mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 10g | Vitamin A: 10IU | Calcium: 75mg | Iron: 3.5mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

I used this Norpro Frozen Ice Pop Maker, for this recipe and it’s one of my favourite moulds to use. Very sturdy and easy to remove the fudgsicles if you run them briefly under hot water then they slide out.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention my Vitamix® Pro750 Food Blender, Copper UK Model since it’s one of my most favourite kitchen appliances and I use it almost daily, not least to make these fudgsicles. This blender is amazing! I loved the Kitchenaid blender I had before but my Vitamix produces the smoothest smoothies, most cohesive sauces and fantastic soups. I have been using it most frequently at the moment for making my iced matcha lattes and I now could not be without it. Okay, it isn’t cheap but if you have the budget for it and you are looking to be really spoilt then I really recommend it. Plus I love the colour!!

Some of the links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy anything using the links then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops {vegan}

Peanut Butter Oaty Chocolate Cookies

Peanut Butter Oaty Chocolate Cookies {gluten-free, dairy-free}

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

Make this Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo using only three ingredients. If you can get hold of Alphonso mangos then your frozen yoghurt will be the sweetest, most fragrant and refreshing treat you’ll make this summer.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

When I was sixteen one of my close friends moved to Singapore with her family for a year. I seized on this opportunity to visit her during the school Easter holidays and had a brilliant time. But of all the things we did and experiences we had the three major memories about my trip are as follows.

  1. How amazing the food was at the food court in the mall.
  2. I had the worst sunburn of my life. Then the next day I went out and got sunburnt again. Ouchy.
  3. The only cure for sunburn, according to my friend’s mother was plenty of aloe vera on the skin and lots of frozen mango in the tummy.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

We would halve our mangos and put them in the freezer in the morning. When we returned from our gallivanting around the city we dug into our frozen mango halves with a spoon. At first they were rock solid but half way through the fruit would yield and become the most delicious and deserved treat after a day in the smoggy heat. In my mind there is no better respite from a muggy June in the city than copious amounts of frozen mango. But just to take it up a notch I have been treating us all these past couple of weeks to this easy Mango Lime Fro-Yo.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

This Fro-Yo has just three ingredients:

  • Mango
  • Lime
  • Coconut Yoghurt

As such the quality of the ingredients really matters.

Alphonso Mangos

Lately our local farmers’ market has had an Alphonso mango stall. Now in general Alphonso mangos are considered to be quite expensive but this isn’t always the case. On my recent Ocado shop I was astounded how much they charged me for two rock hard, bland and pale regular mangos.

The Alphonso mangos I bought from the farmers’ market were actually about a similar price, £7.99 for a box of six. Now the mangos might have been a little small but inside they harboured the most beautifully vibrant orange flesh and were the sweetest, creamiest and richest mangos I have ever tasted. When you are making a three ingredient mango fro-yo, Alphonso Mangos are the mangos you need.

However, playing devil’s advocate, I also made this fro-yo using my regular Ocado mangos. Then another version with the packets of pre-frozen mango. It has to be said all fro-yo iterations were still pretty fabulous so if you can’t get hold of Alphonso mangos. You can certainly make do and still be a happy bunny.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

Dairy-Free Fro-Yo

I am not vegan but chose to make this Mango Lime Fro-Yo vegan stylee because dairy and I don’t always get on so well. If there is a recourse to switch up a recipe without compromising then I’m all for a dairy-free version. Plus using coconut yoghurt adds a little sweetness meaning that teamed with the luscious Alphonsos there is no need to add any extra sweetener.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

How to make Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

The recipe is so simple:

  1. peel and de-stone your mangos, cutting the flesh into cubes.
  2. Place in the freezer overnight
  3. Blend it the next day with the limes and coconut yoghurt.

Blending Tip: You might need to really push the mixture down to the blender’s blades and scrape the sides often as there is not a lot of liquid involved.

This fro-yo is best straightaway out of the blender when it’s very scoopable and smooth. However, you can decant it and place the fro-yo into the freezer for a couple of hours to firm up a little. The longer you leave it in the freezer though the more icy it will become.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

In our house every season is fro-yo season but it’s pretty exciting now we are dangerously entering summer territory and there is absolutely no excuse not to be eating homemade fro-yo.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

Are you looking for another easy vegan frozen treat?

Then why not try this Watermelon Mint Granita?

If you make Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo
Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo

This Vegan Mango Lime Fro-Yo is made using just three ingredients. If you can get hold of Alphonso mangos then your frozen yoghurt will be the sweetest, most fragrant and refreshing treat you’ll make this summer.
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Servings: 6 people
Calories: 85kcal

Ingredients

  • 600 g frozen mango*
  • zest and juice of 2 limes
  • 250 g coconut yoghurt

Instructions

  • Place all the ingredients into the blender.
  • Blend on medium speed, pushing everything down to meet the blade and scraping the sides often until the fro-yo is smooth.
  • Eat straightaway or decant and place in the freezer for a couple of hours to firm up a little.

Notes

*If using fresh mango then peel, de-stone and cube the mango and place in the freezer overnight before using. I used Alphonso mangos in this recipe.

Nutrition

Calories: 85kcal | Carbohydrates: 16g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 5mg | Sodium: 20mg | Potassium: 232mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 15g | Vitamin A: 1125IU | Vitamin C: 36.6mg | Calcium: 61mg | Iron: 0.2mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

The blender that I have been using these past seven months since Luke was kind enough to buy me one for my birthday is the Vitamix® Pro750 Food Blender, Copper UK Model. This blender is amazing! I loved the Kitchenaid blender I had before but my Vitamix produces the smoothest smoothies, most cohesive sauces and fantastic soups. I have been using it most frequently at the moment for making my iced matcha lattes and I now could not be without it. Okay, it isn’t cheap but if you have the budget for it and you are looking to be really spoilt then I really recommend it. Plus I love the colour!!

The links above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to click through to buy then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. It’s just a way for me to fund the blog so if you do click through then many thanks!! To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

Everything But The… Bircher Museli

Everything But The… Bircher Museli is gluten-free and vegan, packed with oats, protein rich nuts and seeds and sweetness and fibre from dried apricots. Left to soak overnight with plant based milk and a crisp grated apple, then mixed with coconut yoghurt and berries the next morning, this is a rocket fuelled breakfast.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

I am having a real love affair with oats at the moment. If I don’t have a good handful of gluten-free oats in whatever I’m eating then really it’s not worth bothering with. I’ve been making batches and batches of 15 minute Peanut Butter Oaty Chocolate Cookies which I’ll be posting about next week and they have been my main source of food over the past few days, all washed down with home-brewed Oatmeal Matcha Lattes which I also can’t get enough of. Another post coming your way soon is the next instalment of my Guide to Gluten-Free Flours series which discusses my favourite flour of them all – oat flour – it’s all about the flavour! In short, everything is coming up oatmeal for me at the moment. Then as the icing on the cake there is this Everything But The… Bircher Museli which I’ve been devouring for breakfast most mornings since Beau was born.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

Now, I say breakfast but when you are awake virtually 24/7 then you have to ask yourself the philosophical question, what is breakfast really? And also, who am, where am I and what day is it? The world is one big fuzz at the moment and I’m breaking no fasts as I’m eating throughout the night hours to keep me awake so I don’t fall asleep on top of my baby. Although now we know why he doesn’t like lying down and only feeds in fits and starts – he has the most terrible acid reflux and unless he is upright against my chest in the sling then he is pretty unhappy. As am I. Since I had debilitating acid reflux for most of my pregnancy I can more than sympathise with the little guy but it is so upsetting to see him in such pain when I’m nursing him. And then even more upsetting when it all comes back up afterwards. All that effort for nothing. It’s a struggle for both of us.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

We are trying to sort out the right medication and dosage levels with the GP to ease his reflux but it’s certainly taking time to work out how best to treat it. It’s certainly not an unusual problem in babies so at least we know eventually it will correct itself but in the meantime feeding Beau and getting him to keep it down is my main priority and sleep is an abstract concept of days gone by.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

During these brain fogged times oats have become my new best friend. I have always enjoyed them but my digestive system couldn’t cope with them for the longest while, even the gluten-free ones. I don’t know if it’s because of all the work I have been doing to heal my gut but lately I’ve been gradually incorporating oats back into my diet and so far I seem to be quite well on them which of course has led to obsession.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

Back before my gluten intolerance was diagnosed I ate Bircher Museli for breakfast every day. I loved it. So easy to make a big batch of the dry museli mix on your Sunday prep and then every evening take a couple of minutes to cover a portion with milk and leave it overnight to soak in the fridge. The next morning I would mix in a bit of yoghurt to make it really creamy and toss in a bunch of berries. So delicious. Of course back then it was regular oats, cows milk and yoghurt I used in the recipe and little did I know it was that seemingly healthy breakfast which was the source of my crippling digestive troubles later on in the day. It was a long road to understand that one.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

Now that I’m more informed as to what foods my body is happiest with, I use gluten-free oats and leave out the bran in the museli mix. I then sub in a bunch of nuts and seeds for nutrition, flavour and crunch and also use plant based yoghurt and milk which I find so much easier to digest. Also because of Beau’s reflux it makes sense for me to keep to a lactose free diet so I’m not exacerbating his troubles.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

I like my Bircher Museli to be ultra creamy so I add a generous amount of milk and yoghurt to my oats but if you like your oats a little sturdier then just add a third less milk and yoghurt.

In fact the whole recipe can really be adapted any which way to suit your tastes, intolerances and larder contents. If you don’t have dried apricots then dates or figs will be good too. Pumpkin seeds can be changed to sunflower seeds. The almonds and pecans could just as easily be walnuts and hazelnuts and if you don’t like coconut then just leave it out. Equally if you don’t have an issue with lactose then feel free to use cow’s milk and yoghurt. Although if you would like to try something new then I do really recommend the plant based alternatives which impart so much flavour. My favourite, as noted below, is a mix of coconut and almond milk with cooling coconut yoghurt. You can use the natural flavoured coconut yoghurt but if you want a real treat then the vanilla coconut yoghurt is outstanding.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

The recipe below though, as it stands, is my preferred way to incorporate all the delicious nutritious taste I need to get me through my current, and it seems never ending, sleep deprivation.

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

Everything But The… Bircher Museli is packed with gluten-free oats, protein-rich nuts and seeds and sweetness and fibre from dried apricots.
Prep Time15 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: British
Servings: 10 servings
Calories: 346kcal

Ingredients

Museli Mix

  • 275 g gluten-free jumbo rolled oats
  • 80 g dried apricots chopped
  • 50 g pumpkin seeds
  • 40 g almonds roughly chopped
  • 40 g pecans roughly chopped
  • 30 g ground flaxseed
  • 30 g desiccated coconut
  • 25 g chia seeds
  • 20 g sesame seeds

Bircher Museli (serves 1)

  • 40 g museli
  • 60 g almond milk
  • 60 g coconut milk
  • ½ granny smith apple grated
  • 60 g coconut yoghurt
  • Handful of mixed berries

Instructions

Museli Mix

  • Mix all the ingredients together at the beginning of the week then keep in a large glass storage jar until needed.

Bircher Museli

  • In a small cereal bowl pour the milks over the museli then stir in the grated apple.
  • Place cling film over the top then leave in the fridge overnight to soak.
  • The next morning stir in the coconut yoghurt and sprinkle the berries over the top to serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 346kcal | Carbohydrates: 48g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 17g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Cholesterol: 7mg | Sodium: 206mg | Potassium: 516mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 24g | Vitamin A: 280IU | Vitamin C: 4.2mg | Calcium: 155mg | Iron: 5.5mg

Best Granola Bars

These Granola Bars really are the best. They are gluten-free and vegan with no refined sugar and plenty of energy boosting ingredients, plus they are super tasty.

Best Granola Bars (gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free)

Happy New Year! I am kicking off this year’s recipes with an old favourite of mine, my very Best Granola Bars, which have yet to feature on the blog. And now seems the perfect time what with all the good intentions abounding.

Best Granola Bars (gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free)

2018 is an exciting year, I’m at a place in my life where I am happily surrounded by children and babies. Not counting my own new arrival in April, several of my closest friends are pregnant and expecting in the first quarter of the year. And since most of my gifts, birthdays, Christmas or otherwise usually have a food theme, they can expect a batch of these Best Granola Bars to be materialising on their doorsteps during those first few days home from the hospital.

Best Granola Bars (gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free)

I started making these Best Granola Bars for my friends with newborns as I found they are absolutely perfect for the snacking that is an essential part of this time. Whether keeping up energy levels during middle of the night feeds, or when you can only cope with food that requires one hand since the other is occupied with your new bundle these Best Granola Bars are ideal. They are also pretty useful for offering to the plethora of guests clamouring to see the new baby or your hungry toddler who is a little disgruntled that your attention is now split with another child.

Best Granola Bars (gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free)

When I first had Cole the food I was eating got totally out of control, it was cake, chocolate and biscuits morning, noon and 2am. At a time when you are supposed to be looking after yourself for the sake of your newborn it’s absolutely impossible as tiredness takes over and everything within you is poured into looking after your new baby. Food is way down on your priority list after nursing, changing nappies, burping and sleeping but you really need some organic energy to keep you going. By the time Cole was a few weeks old I had graduated my eating habits to shop-bought granola bars but there are all sorts of hidden ingredients in them and although a better choice than biscuits they are not really that good for you either. All the ingredients in these Best Granola Bars are meant to satisfy, keep your hunger levels at bay and promote your energy whilst tasting pretty delicious.

Best Granola Bars (gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free)

I’ve put all my favourite seeds and nuts into this bar to boost up the protein. There is crunch from the chia seeds, almonds, pumpkin seeds and puffed rice. Chewiness from the dates and bags of taste, amped up by a little cinnamon and vanilla extract. Almond butter and coconut oil help to bind and there is no refined sugar, just the dates and a good splash of maple syrup.

I ate these Best Granola Bars for a lot of 2017 even without a newborn to look after. It goes without saying that you don’t really need a child to appreciate them, just an empty tummy that is looking at a vast empty chasm before its next meal.

Best Granola Bars (gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free)

Best Granola Bars

Best Granola Bars are gluten-free and vegan with no refined sugar and plenty of energy boosting ingredients, plus they are super tasty.
Prep Time20 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Snack
Cuisine: British
Servings: 16 Bars
Calories: 339kcal

Ingredients

  • 225 g gluten-free rolled oats
  • 100 g whole raw almonds roughly chopped
  • 70 g pumpkin seeds
  • 60 g gluten-free puffed brown rice cereal
  • 40 g chia seeds
  • 40 g ground flaxseed
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 175 g coconut oil melted
  • 150 g almond butter
  • 120 g pitted medjool dates
  • 75 g maple syrup
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  • In a large mixing bowl throw together the oats, almonds, pumpkin seeds, puffed rice, chia seeds, flaxseeds, cinnamon and salt and mix well.
  • Pour into a blender, the coconut oil, almond butter, dates, maple syrup and vanilla extract and blend on high for a couple of minutes until the mixture is thick and caramel-like.
  • Stir the blended mixture into the dry ingredients and mix very well until all the dry ingredients are completely coated. You may have to dig in with your hands at this point.
  • Tip the granola bar mixture into a lined and greased 9 inch square tin and press very firmly into the tin with your hands until good and even.
  • Place in the fridge for at least 4 hours or overnight.
  • Remove from the tin and cut into bars.

Notes

Keep the granola bars in the fridge where they can reside happily for up to 2 weeks.

Nutrition

Calories: 339kcal | Carbohydrates: 27g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 24g | Saturated Fat: 10g | Sodium: 76mg | Potassium: 298mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 10IU | Vitamin C: 0.1mg | Calcium: 93mg | Iron: 2.1mg

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops

The current heatwave in London necessitates the need to cool down by whatever means. We Brits may not built for this weather, but that’s when these Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops come into play.

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops {vegan}

I love it when a recipe is as intuitive as this one was. I spend ages deciding over which one of my recipes I should post here next. Too long. In fact I spend more time fluctuating between whether I should post my new layer cake, or maybe that granola bar recipe which I have been slaving over this past week than actually making, photographing or writing about any of my recipes. Haven’t I just posted a layer cake last week. Is it really granola bar season? I need to just pick one and go with it.

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops {vegan}

Or just let the recipe choose me. Yesterday morning Cole and I made these Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops (Ice lollies? Popsicles? I spent a good half hour deliberating over that one too) in 10 minutes as he sat on my kitchen top repeating, “Whatssat?”
“Mango, darling.”
“Mango Mummy…..Whatssat?”
“Mango, darling”
“Mango Mummy…..Whatssat?”
You get the picture.

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops {vegan}

I had been wanting to make ice lollies for days to cool us both down in this incessant heat. Our tiny victorian railway cottage has taken on the form of a casserole pot, trapping all the heat in and braising us in our own juices. By 3pm after Cole has woken up from his lunchtime nap and I have calmed him down from the injustice of being cooked in his sleep, then spending any time actually doing anything rather than chucking ourselves into the nearest paddling pool is inconceivable.

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops {vegan}

Yesterday morning though, as I scoured the fridge for breakfast food I came across a long forgotten mango which still looked pretty good. Not a moment later I declared lolly time and with glee Cole watched as I dragged the blender over. He loves helping with the smoothies so blenders get a fine welcome in our kitchen.

I peeled and chopped the mango, prompting the above conversation, threw the flesh into the blender along with a tin of coconut milk for healthy fats, a bit of almond butter for healthy protein and a teaspoon of turmeric, thereby warding off any form of horrible disease which may be winging its way in our future direction.

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops {vegan}

I forgot momentarily that toddlers don’t understand the concept of patience so Cole was quite indignant that we couldn’t enjoy them right away, and I realised my mistake over making such a hoopla about making lollies, the indignance threated to topple into something more when I extracted his sticky little hands from inside the filled lolly mould. However it was all made better when I poured him out a little leftover smoothie mix into a cup and he could stick his hand into that instead. It was a fine choice making them in the morning though as it meant that by yesterday afternoon when Cole awoke from his nap I earned Mother of the Year by presenting my grumpy little gnome with the perfect icy treat for surviving this blistering heat. I had one too, and we enjoyed them whilst splashing around in the paddling pool.

Mango Turmeric Coconut Smoothie Pops

These deliciously cooling smoothie pops are full of good fats, protein and a teaspoon of turmeric.
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time8 hrs 10 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Servings: 8 pops
Calories: 136kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 mango
  • 400 ml coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric

Instructions

  • Peel the mango and cut the flesh into rough cubes.
  • Place in a blender with the rest of the ingredients and whizz until smooth.
  • Pour carefully into ice lolly moulds and freeze overnight or at least 8 hours.

Nutrition

Calories: 136kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 10g | Sodium: 7mg | Potassium: 181mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 225IU | Vitamin C: 8mg | Calcium: 25mg | Iron: 1.9mg

If you want smoothie pops that look like mine then you can buy the Norpro Frozen Ice Pop Maker from Amazon. I have been using mine for two summers now and love it. It comes with some wooden sticks when you need more they are also easy to buy from Amazon.

If you want to know what blender we use which provokes such a raucous response from my son then it’s the KitchenAid Artisan Blender. I smashed the glass jug once so we were without it for a couple of months before I got my act together to buy a new one. The cheapo blender we used in the meantime did not compare. I was so happy to get my blender back. I’ve had it for years and use it nearly every day.

The images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these links to buy your ice lolly maker or blender then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. It’s just a way for me to fund my shopping list so if you do click through then many thanks!!