Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes are beautifully rich, tender and crisp. A really luxurious way to pamper your potatoes and your guests on special occasions.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

I first had these potatoes at the old Fire Engine House restaurant in Ely, Cambridgeshire where my in-laws live. It’s a lovely restaurant set in the old fire engine house (the name probably didn’t really need explaining). A small bar is situated in the front of the house in a little sitting room area with a roaring fire and gives the illusion that you are guest in somebody’s house. Somebody who is incredibly lucky with a fully stocked bar in their front room. When your table is ready you are led through the house, past the kitchen so you can have a good old nosy at the chefs and into the back dining room that leads out onto a pretty garden. The food is traditional but not the same old same old that is served boringly in gastropubs. All their produce is local, seasonal and all made in their lovely kitchen from the relishes to the jams that accompany the dishes. However where they really won my heart is when they came round just as we were finishing our mains and asked if we wanted seconds. Not only did that cater for my incredibly greedy nature but it also seconded the feeling that you were round at a friend’s house. A very well to do friend with a really fancy house. The staff could not have been more welcoming and when I said how delicious their roast potatoes were, well they told me the recipe.

I didn’t even realise good old faithful roast potatoes could be improved. I mean, I think they must be the most moreish food in existence, there is always room for another potato. This past year I eschewed all white potato in favour of sweet potato as I was living more or less a paleo lifestyle (that is if you don’t count the cake I was eating on a weekly basis) but recently I have re-introduced it to my diet and nothing is making me currently happier than my Sunday Roasts with a traditional roast white potato, crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.

This week I came across my scribbled notes that I had taken after dining at old Fire Engine House and was reminded of those flavour busting crisp yet creamy potatoes I had eaten by the truckload at the time.

 

It turns out that they are even more special than I had remembered and this time of year when we are preparing our most indulgent recipes for the festive season there is no excuse for not accompanying your turkey with these rich little beasts. The potatoes are cooked twice, first baked in cream, milk and garlic until they are soft and have absorbed most of the garlicky cream, then they are tipped into smoking hot fat and roasted for half an hour so that the cream bakes around the potato like a little crisp jacket, trapping all the flavour and soft texture that was captured during its initial bake.

They do take a little longer to cook than your average roast potato as I like to keep these ones whole but really they are no more bother as they pretty much sort themselves out in the oven. The end result is so worth it that I think you’ll have trouble going back to your usual boring roasties. Make sure you choose potatoes of a similar size to ensure even cooking so each one is as creamy to the fork as the next.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes are beautifully rich, tender and crisp.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time2 hrs
Total Time2 hrs 20 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: British
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 691kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 kg potatoes
  • 400 ml double cream
  • 400 ml whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 cloves
  • 5 black peppercorns
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 garlic cloves crushed with the back of a knife
  • 1 sprig of thyme
  • 50 ml olive oil

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 160°C.
  • Peel the potatoes then place into a large casserole dish.
  • Pour in the cream and milk and ensure the potatoes are fully submerged and then add the butter, bay leaves, cloves, black peppercorns, salt, garlic cloves and thyme.
  • Put the lid on the casserole dish and bake in the oven for 1½ hours until the potatoes are cooked all the way through.
  • Remove the dish from the oven then turn the heat up to 180°C.
  • Pour the olive oil into a roasting tray and place in the oven for 3 minutes for the oil to heat.
  • Then remove the potatoes from the cream with a slotted spoon and place gently into the hot oil of the roasting tray. Coat the potatoes with the oil and place in the oven to roast for 30 minutes, turning the potatoes halfway through.
  • Remove from the oven and serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 691kcal | Carbohydrates: 40g | Protein: 12g | Fat: 56g | Saturated Fat: 28g | Cholesterol: 155mg | Sodium: 423mg | Potassium: 1249mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 1720IU | Vitamin C: 30.2mg | Calcium: 257mg | Iron: 8.2mg

Pecan Treacle Tart

This Pecan Treacle Tart is a glorious transatlantic marriage between a Pecan Pie and a Treacle Tart. It’s the best of both worlds, deeply nutty, rich and sticky.

Pecan Treacle Tart

I originally posted this recipe in 2014 before the blog became gluten-free. These are the original photos and the recipe has been kept exactly as is below. However, I recently re-tested this recipe using a gluten-free pastry and gluten-free breadcrumbs which are one of the main ingredients of the tart and I was thrilled to discover the recipe loses nothing in the translation, so I have scribbled the gluten-free version down in the notes below.

This recipe is a mish mash of Pecan Pie from across the way and a traditional British Treacle tart. It seemed to make complete sense to me to combine the best bits about both recipes for an ultimate sweet treat.

Pecan Treacle Tart

The actual recipes if you look at them are quite similar bar swapping the nuts and breadcrumbs around. An American Pecan Pie calls for dark molasses or corn syrup instead of golden syrup traditionally used in treacle tarts. I stuck with what I know and turned to the golden syrup. However, I gave a nod to the intensely treacly flavour of the dark molasses by adding a smidge of black treacle which adds depth to the sweetness, giving this Pecan Treacle Tart a bit of backbone.

Whereas a treacle tart and a pecan pie use breadcrumbs or roughly chopped pecans respectively in their fillings. Here both are used gives the tart both body and softness. It’s a perfect texture. When I originally developed this recipe before I was gluten-free I used brioche breadcrumbs which add a lovely sweet butteriness but in re-testing the recipe I used breadcrumbs from a gluten-free sourdough and I was not at all disappointed with the results.

Pecan Treacle Tart

Finally I’ve finished the tart filling off with a splash of lemon juice to cut through the richness and a tweak of vanilla extract just like they do in pecan pies.

This tart really is wonderful. A delightful alternative to Pecan Pie if you are looking to switch things up this Thanksgiving or if you are keen on upping the ante of your usual British Treacle Tart. Delicious warm with whipped cream.

Pecan Treacle Tart

Pecan Treacle Tart

This Pecan Treacle Tart is a glorious transatlantic marriage between a Pecan Pie and a Treacle Tart, deeply nutty, rich and sticky (gluten-free option).
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time50 mins
Total Time1 hr 20 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American, British
Servings: 8 servings
Calories: 623kcal

Ingredients

For the pastry - for gluten-free pastry recipe see notes below

  • 270 g plain flour
  • 100 g unsalted butter fridge cold
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 egg + 1 egg yolk
  • 1 egg lightly beaten for the egg wash

For the filling

  • 360 g golden syrup
  • 40 g black treacle
  • pinch of salt
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • 100 g brioche breadcrumbs or gluten-free breadcrumbs
  • 75 g pecans toasted then roughly chopped plus extra for decorating on the top

Instructions

  • To begin with make your pastry. Take the butter out of the fridge and slice very finely with a sharp knife, then place in a large mixing bowl with the flour.
  • Tear the butter up and coat thoroughly with the flour, then begin to rub gently between your fingertips until you reach very rough breadcrumbs, don’t take it too fine. It should take less than 5 minutes.
  • Add the sugar, salt, egg and egg yolk then bring together into a dough. Tip it out onto the work surface and press together to form a ball. Wrap in baking parchment and chill in the fridge for 30 minutes.
  • Meanwhile make the filling. Warm the syrup and black treacle with the salt, then tip into a large mixing bowl.
  • Whisk in the double cream, then the egg.
  • Add the breadcrumbs and the pecans, lemon juice and vanilla then set aside.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 170°C.
  • Remove the pastry from the fridge and roll out until it is about 3mm thick. Line the pastry into the bottom of the tin. The tin I used was 35cm x 11cm.
  • Place some greaseproof paper on top of the pastry then pour baking beans on top.
  • Place in the oven for 15 minutes to blind bake. Remove the baking beans, brush with the egg wash then place back in the oven for a further 5 minutes.
  • Turn the oven down to 160°C.
  • Stir the treacle mixture, then pour into the pastry. Place in the oven and bake for 35-40 minutes until the filling has set. Allow the tart to cool in the tin before cutting.

Notes

Gluten-Free Pastry
140g sweet rice flour, plus extra flour for dusting
125g sorghum flour
75g almond flour
25g ground flaxseeds
125g unsalted butter, directly from the fridge
100g caster sugar
2 eggs + 1 yolk, lightly beaten
pinch of salt
1-2 tablespoon whole milk
300g mincemeat
1 egg yolk + 1 teaspoon whole milk whisked together for the wash
In a large mixing bowl whisk together the sweet rice flour, sorghum flour, almond flour and chia seeds.
Slice the butter very thinly and add to the flour. Then rub the mixture between fingertips until roughly shorn and crumbly.
Whisk in the caster sugar and then pour in the eggs.
Bring the dough together using a wooden spoon at first if you like and then your hands. If the dough is still too dry and crumbly then add a little extra whole milk.
Turn the pastry out on to the work surface and knead very briefly into a ball until the dough is cohesive and slightly sticky.
Wrap the pastry dough in cling film and place in the fridge for at least 30 minutes (or up to 3 days).

Nutrition

Calories: 623kcal | Carbohydrates: 88g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 26g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Cholesterol: 114mg | Sodium: 124mg | Potassium: 211mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 53g | Vitamin A: 675IU | Vitamin C: 0.8mg | Calcium: 84mg | Iron: 3.4mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

I used this Alan Silverwood Tarte Maison with Loose Base 35cm x 12cm for this Pecan Treacle Tart. I love these Alan Silverwood tins as they conduct heat so efficiently making your tart perfectly baked.

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