Cranberry Cream Pie

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie

Cranberry Cream Pie is tart and fruity with a buttery gluten-free biscuit crust, topped with whipped cream clouds.

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie

I have to be honest that the main reason I made this Cranberry Cream Pie was because I wanted some colour. Our house has a tendency to be a bit brown. There is original stripped wood everywhere; floors, doors, skirting, shutters, my bakers rack and our dining table. And that is just our living area. It definitely has a cosy relaxed feel (and by relaxed I mean messy) but it does crave colour. I love this time of year when the bright red and plush burgundy tones really ramp up the warm snug vibe we’ve got going on. And sometimes I need that colour to not just be present in the cushions, candles or Christmas decorations but in our glorious Christmas feast.

side view of a slice of Cranberry Cream Pie

It helps that Cranberry Cream Pie is not only the most stunning deep magenta but is also utterly delicious. This pie has it all, the looks and the personality. Zingy, creamy and crunchy.

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie

Cranberry Cream Pie has a thick biscuit crust, made from my favourite gluten-free oat biscuits and plenty of melted butter. The filling is so easy to pull together. just fruity fresh cranberries pureed and mixed with condensed milk, a spritz of lemon juice and egg yolks. It’s really just a wobbly cranberry custard. I used whipping cream to adorn this lovely pie as it’s a bit lighter than double cream and dissolves beautifully in your mouth. Of course use double cream or heavy cream if that’s all you can find. Whipping cream doesn’t see as prevalent as it once was.

I really like the idea of serving Cranberry Cream Pie on Christmas Eve this year alongside our Christmas Glazed Ham. The beautiful colours of the Christmas table lit by candlelight, with a vibrant taste to match, sounds incredibly appealing.

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie with slice taken out

If you make this Cranberry Cream Pie then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own kitchen creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

side view of a slice of Cranberry Cream Pie

Cranberry Cream Pie

Cranberry Cream Pie is tart and fruity with a buttery gluten-free biscuit crust, topped with whipped cream clouds.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time40 mins
Total Time55 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: cranberry cream pie, cranberry cream pie recipe
Servings: 10 servings
Calories: 726kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 450 g cranberries + 3 tablespoons water
  • 500 g gluten-free oat biscuits*
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • Juice ½ lemon
  • 8 egg yolks
  • 1 tin condensed milk 397g
  • 400 ml whipping cream

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 170°C/ 150°C fan/gas mark 3.
  • Place the cranberries in a medium sized saucepan with the water and cook on a low heat for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally until the cranberries have broken down.
  • Blend the cranberries until they are smooth then set aside in the fridge to cool completely.
  • Melt the butter in a small saucepan and leave to cool for a few minutes just so the butter is warm rather than hot which helps your biscuit base from becoming too greasy.
  • Whizz up the biscuits in a food processor then with the mixer still on pour in the melted butter until it combines with the biscuit to become a thick sandy texture.
  • Press the biscuit crust into a 23cm pie dish using the back of a spoon and push the base up the sides of the dish.
  • Bake the crust for 18 minutes then remove from the oven. Gently re-press and shape the biscuit crust which might have puffed up a bit and then leave to cool in the fridge to set whilst you make the filling.
  • Turn the oven down to 160°C/140°C fan/gas mark 1.
  • Mix the cranberries, lemon juice, egg yolks and condensed milk in a large mixing bowl.
  • Pour the cranberry filling into pie shell, smoothing out the top.
  • Bake the pie for 25 minutes, the cranberry filling should still be a little wobbly.
  • Leave to cool and set in the fridge overnight.
  • Whip the cream until thick and it can hold its shape then pipe over the top of the pie.
  • Serve chilled.

Notes

*my favourite oat biscuits to use at the moment are Nairn's Oats & Syrup Biscuit Breaks. They are too yummy!

Nutrition

Calories: 726kcal | Carbohydrates: 60g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 50g | Saturated Fat: 26g | Cholesterol: 277mg | Sodium: 337mg | Potassium: 286mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 31g | Vitamin A: 29.4% | Vitamin C: 8.8% | Calcium: 18.3% | Iron: 10.8%

SHOP THE RECIPE

I would be nowhere without my Magimix 4200XL Food Processor – Satin for making the crust for this recipe. I have easily had it over ten years and I use it nearly every day for whipping up dips, pestos, nut butters, nut and oat flour and making my breadcrumbs. The Magixmix is an impressive piece of kit which even survived being dropped when we moved into our house (although it did have to have the motor replaced but that wasn’t too expensive). I put all the attachments in the dishwasher and they come out brilliantly clean but it also gives just great results. I love my Magimix and along with my Kitchenaid is the piece of equipment I use most often in my kitchen.

I bought this immersion blender when I began weaning Beau a few months ago and haven’t looked back. My big blender isn’t always appropriate when blending a small amount of food. Also these cranberries blend to quite a thick paste and I could imagine most of the fruit getting lost beneath the blades. This immersion blender is perfect. You stick it directly in the saucepan and your cranberries are blended in moments. I also liked the fact that there was still a little bit of texture – the blend is not 100% smooth. I like this Russell Hobbs Food Collection Hand Blender 22241, 200 W – White as it’s extremely affordable and straightforward to use.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Gluten-Free Gravy

This Gluten-Free Gravy is deliciously smooth, rich and full of flavour. Here are all the tips and tricks to get it just right.

Gluten-Free Gravy

My mother and father both made good gravy. It was an absolutely essential recipe in our household growing up because of the importance of our Sunday Lunch. Thick juicy rich brown gravy flavoured with fresh garden herbs would cook for hours on the hob over the course of the day. It was always the last element to be placed steaming hot onto the dinner table. Two magnificent gravy boats stood proudly at either end to be poured liberally over our roast beef and Yorkshire puddings.

Ours was not a household for thin wispy gravy made delicately from drizzled juices. Our gravy was the crowning glory of the meal and did double duty as it provided the ultimate treat when our meat and veggies were done. My father would return to the kitchen to grab a loaf of thick farmhouse bread and cut huge slices for each of us to place on our dinner plates. We would then soak the bread in any leftover gravy, with perhaps an extra slug of mint sauce, wait until the bread was deliciously soppy before devouring greedily. It was a ritual and it didn’t matter how stuffed you were after lunch, the bread and gravy was a must and the bit we most looked forward to and tried to save room for.

The importance of our Sunday lunch has not wavered into my adulthood and since I became gluten-free it has been of utmost importance to me to achieve a triumphant gravy that would pacify the whole family. I don’t do the bread and gravy thing with my family, which is a huge loss really. However, I can’t help but sneak back into the kitchen on the odd occasion, when all the plates have been cleared, and help myself to just one more Yorkshire pudding dragged through the gravy pan for that last little treat when no one else is watching.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How to make gravy with drippings

If you want to make proper actual traditional gravy then your only choice is to use the pan drippings from your roasted meat. There are two ways of doing this. You can either make a quick gravy at the end of your meal whilst your meat is resting or if you don’t want your gravy to be a last minute rush and you want to get really good flavour then you could plan ahead. We make a Sunday Lunch every week and on the odd occasion that I don’t make a traditional gravy I will save my drippings and keep them in little pots in the freezer, alongside my homemade stock. I have a whole compartment dedicated to fat and stock. So when I need to make a gravy I always have drippings to hand, plus it means I can make my gravy ahead. This is especially useful at Christmas as I can make my gravy a couple of days before. Also making gravy ahead of time really allows the flavours to develop and gives a better sauce.

TIP: To make sure you achieve a good quantity of drippings (enough to help you out with your Yorkshire puddings and gravy) I pour a generous amount of olive oil over my joint or bird before roasting. The more olive oil means the more meat flavoured fat at the end of the roast.

How do I make gravy without meat drippings?

It’s easy. Maybe your meat didn’t produce very much or maybe you are making a veggie gravy. If you don’t have drippings or not enough then sub in some unsalted butter or ghee instead. For vegans, use vegan butter.

What can I use to thicken gluten-free gravy?

When I first became gluten-free and tried making gravy using a generic gluten-free flour I was disappointed, thinking that I would never again be able to enjoy gravy the same way. This gravy was thin and granular and lacked lustre. After a lot of experimentation I found the best flour to use is sweet rice flour. Sweet rice flour is absolutely essential to make a beautifully smooth velvety gluten-free roux and produce a sauce with a silky mouthfeel. It absorbs moisture very well so doesn’t clump and so is even easier to use than wheat flour. The flavour is pretty neutral with an ever so slightly sweet vibe which lends itself to the gravy perfectly.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How do you make gravy browner and richer?

In order to achieve a lustrous rich dark brown colour to gravy traditionally you would cook your flour and butter low and slow before adding the liquid so that the roux darkens to give flavour and colour to your gravy. However, sweet rice flour needs handling a little differently and I wouldn’t recommend this direction. Instead you can either use coconut aminos to lend its colour to the proceedings which works excellently, but you need a fair bit so you might need to check your seasonings. Or you can use the onion method as below.

Cook the onion in the drippings or butter for about 20 minutes until they are just starting to brown, but not at all burnt. Then when you add your sweet rice flour followed by the stock they take on this rich brown colour from the onions. It also gives your gravy further depth of flavour. You strain off your gravy at the end so you won’t get bits of onion in your gravy.

How do you make gravy without homemade stock?

So there are occasions when you just don’t have homemade chicken or vegetable stock to hand. At this point you have two options, you can either use fresh stock from the butcher or the supermarket but I find these tend to be a little bland or oversalted so go carefully with them. The other direction is to use whole milk. Yes, this does create a completely different beast but one that is worth experimenting with if you are caught out at short notice. This gravy is obviously creamier and richer but absolutely delicious. If I’m going down this latter route then I might also add a few garlic granules to help with the flavour. If you are dairy-free or vegan then you can also substitute with almond milk which I have done on many an occasion and it works just as well.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How do you add flavour to gravy?

If you are using the drippings from the meat and homemade stock then most of your gravy flavour begins right there. However, to help it along, or if you are subbing ingredients, do add a couple of bay leaves, some fresh thyme or even some rosemary to liven up the flavours. The gravy will also need a little sweetness to balance things out. You could use a glug of white wine or masala which makes for a very sophisticated gravy. However I like to use a bit of fruit jelly. Any good jelly works well here. Redcurrant jelly is easy to find at the supermarket and can usually be found with the condiments (not with the jams and preserves) or cranberry jelly which is lovely at Thanksgiving or Christmas.

How do you re-heat gravy?

Gravy thickens the longer it stands so if you are re-heating then it’s best to do on the hob in a saucepan and whisk in a little extra liquid (stock or just water would be fine).

It turns out that making good gluten-free gravy is easy peasy, especially if you have sweet rice flour in your arsenal. Many of the other ingredients can be subbed or played with depending on what you have to hand or the different dietary needs of your guests. The lovely thing about gravy is that it always tastes slightly different every time but always delicious. Go on, sneak back into the kitchen for that extra Yorkshire pud and gravy treat.

Gluten-Free Gravy

Gluten-Free Gravy

This Gluten-Free Gravy is deliciously smooth, rich and full of flavour. Here are all the tips and tricks to get it just right.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time50 mins
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: British
Keyword: gluten-free gravy, gluten-free gravy recipe, gluten-free meat gravy
Servings: 6 people
Calories: 143kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 50 g unsalted butter or drippings from roasted meat
  • 1 onion chopped very finely
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 800 ml chicken stock preferably homemade
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon redcurrant jelly or apple jelly or cranberry jelly

Instructions

  • Melt the butter or dripping, then add the diced onion and heat on medium for about 20 minutes until they are starting to turn brown (but definitely not burnt).
  • Add all the flour and mix with a wooden spoon until the fat has absorbed all the flour.
  • Pour in about a quarter of the stock, then switch to using a whisk, stirring all the time to smooth out the lumps. Once the gravy is beginning to thicken then pour the rest of the stock in slowly, whisking all the while.
  • Add the bay leaf, thyme and stir in the redcurrant jelly, bringing the gravy up to a gentle boil. If the gravy is too thick for you, add some more stock or just water to get to your desired consistency.
  • Simmer for 15 minutes then remove from the heat and strain. Keep warm until ready to serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 143kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 21mg | Sodium: 192mg | Potassium: 166mg | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 4.8% | Vitamin C: 3.3% | Calcium: 1.3% | Iron: 2.4%

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overhead shot of Gluten-Free Cauliflower Cheese in a serving dish with a spoon on a wooden board with plates

Gluten-Free Gravy

Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing

This Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing is so flavourful. Crisp on top with a beautifully soft yet robust texture you won’t even notice it is vegetarian, let alone gluten-free.

Sage Chestnut Stuffing

This is the stuffing recipe that I bring to our festive table every year. My mother-in-law is vegetarian so when Luke and I first started hosting Christmas at our house I put aside my trusted sausagemeat recipe and set about creating a new family favourite that everyone could enjoy.

Sage Chestnut Stuffing

I actually prefer this Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing to my sausage version as there is always so much meat on the festive table from the turkey to the ham to the pigs in blankets. The addition of a herby hearty stuffing is exactly the right accompaniment to the rest of the meal.

Sage Chestnut Stuffing

I use whole peeled vacuum packed chestnuts to make the stuffing which are so easy to use and are widely available at this time of year. They are also delicious directly from the packet and have a wonderful earthy flavour with a crumbly creamy texture. The chestnuts pair exceedingly well with the rustic notes of the fresh sage and the sweet onions.

Sage Chestnut Stuffing

The only bit of faff in this recipe is caramelising the onions at the beginning of the recipe which is necessary to add the soft sweetness to the stuffing. Then all you need to do is mix the onions with the crumbled chestnuts, fresh breadcrumbs and fresh sage. A bit of seasoning, an egg to bind and a splash of double cream for moisture and there you have it. I usually prepare the stuffing a day or two in advance and pack it into an ovenproof dish to keep in the fridge ready for the oven. I don’t cook my stuffing in the bird cavity. Does anyone still do this anymore? But it’s lovely baked in a separate dish to create a crisp topping with the soft stuffing beneath.

Sage Chestnut Stuffing

On the big day, after the turkey has been taken out of the oven, the stuffing goes in. It only needs to bake for 20 minutes so doesn’t clog up precious oven space for any length of time. I have also in the past formed stuffing balls with this recipe which also work really well as the surface of the balls get quite crunchy, a perfect contrast to the squishy insides.

Sage Chestnut Stuffing

This Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing is like a very low key nut roast and it is certainly meaty enough in texture to be a pretty decent offering for your vegetarian guests at Thanksgiving or Christmas. Served alongside some powerhouse vegetable sides like the cauliflower cheese, which I also make every year, you can ensure everyone is going to be pretty well served at your festivities.

I urge you to give this Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing a try, it is so easy and delicious. If you do make this Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious creation, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing

This Gluten-Free Sage Chestnut Stuffing is so flavourful. Crisp on top with a beautifully soft yet robust texture you won’t even notice it is vegetarian.
Prep Time40 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time1 hr
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: British
Keyword: gluten-free sage chestnut stuffing, gluten-free stuffing, gluten-free stuffing recipe
Servings: 8 servings
Calories: 158kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 2 large onions peeled and diced
  • 30 g unsalted butter + 1 teaspoon
  • 180 g whole peeled vacuum packed chestnuts
  • 15 g fresh sage leaves removed
  • 150 g gluten-free sourdough or the best gluten-free bread you can find
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons double cream
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  • Place the onions in a saucepan along 30g butter and cook very gently for 30-40 minutes until the onions have caramelized.
  • Tip the onions in a large mixing bowl then set aside whilst you prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  • Place the saucepan back on the heat and add the extra teaspoon of butter to melt. Drop the fresh sage into the saucepan and fry gently until starting to colour then remove and finely chop. Add to the onions.
  • Break up the gluten-free sourdough and place in a food processor along with the chestnuts. Pulse briefly until they are roughly chopped. Then tip into the onions along with the beaten egg, double cream and seasoning.
  • Press the stuffing into an ovenware dish and leave in the fridge overnight to set.
  • Bake in an oven pre-heated to 180°C/170°C fan/gas mark 4 for 20-25 minutes until the top is golden and crisp.

Nutrition

Calories: 158kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 33mg | Sodium: 252mg | Potassium: 180mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 3.6% | Vitamin C: 13.4% | Calcium: 2.9% | Iron: 6.3%

SHOP THE RECIPE

These Merchant Gourmet Whole Chestnuts 180 g (Pack of 6) are gorgeous chestnuts, so yummy as a snack and so easy to use for this recipe.

I would be nowhere without my Magimix 4200XL Food Processor – Satin which I bought when I was so jealous of everyone making their own houmous and pestos. That was easily over ten years ago and I use it nearly every day for all manner of kitchen jobs like whipping up dips, nut butters and flours and making breadcrumbs like for this recipe. The Magixmix is an impressive piece of kit which even survived being dropped when we moved into our house (although it did have to have the motor replaced but that wasn’t too expensive). I put all the attachments in the dishwasher and they come out brilliantly clean but it also gives just great results. I love my Magimix and along with my Kitchenaid is the piece of equipment I use most often in my kitchen.

The links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy anything using the links given then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

Sage Chestnut Stuffing

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Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

 

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Homemade Cranberry Clementine Sauce is the perfect accompaniment to the festive turkey. The bright shiny flavours are enhanced by a touch of spice.

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

It’s about time that I came clean here on the blog with what my deal is at the moment. A lot of my posts have been late, if they have been posted at all and my Gluten-Free Flour series went on a rather long sabbatical. If you follow my market stall then I basically opted out of late summer/early autumn then upped sticks to a completely different market.

Back in July I was ahead of the game, I had managed to carve out a good amount of time of pure recipe testing, writing and photography and had posts planned for about 6 weeks ahead. I was intending to return to posting twice a week to get through all the recipes I wanted to share and things I wanted to say before the year was out. It was all going swimmingly.

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Then I was struck down with both the most amazing news I had been wishing so hopefully for and the most debilitating morning sickness imaginable. Yes, I am expecting again and by goodness this new addition wanted my whole life to be put on hold whilst he settled into his temporary home for the next forty weeks. I could barely raise an arm out of bed, I couldn’t eat and when I did it was a huge mistake. All I was fit to do was sleep and my whole body felt wretched. Any ounce of energy I could dredge up from the depths went to ferrying Cole around to family, friends and nursery, anyone who could actually look after him whilst I went into complete hibernation and felt like the worst, most pathetic mother alive.

It took about 16 full weeks until I felt reasonably human. With the aid of my lovely husband I only managed to miss about 6 weeks of cake stalls. I had to change markets though to one much closer to home to suit my new exhausted and sickly state of being. Although this actually has turned out to be a great decision despite having to say goodbye to my lovely market at Tottenham Green. I’ve now had about a month of being okay, although of course with the next phase of pregnancy comes other challenges. However, I’m now well, eating healthily again and happy to be baking and preserving for all the festive markets on the horizon. Plus if you were reading with intent earlier in the post you’ll notice that we’re having another boy which fills me with so much excitement. Cole is simply the best little human in the world so to have two of those sounds like a dream. A dream in which the house is filled with double the amount of shouting, troublemaking, carnage, toy cars, fire engines, trains and Paw Patrol paraphernalia and where I am being constantly climbed on, grabbed, poked, pulled and run ragged. Wait, is that a dream or is it something else?

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

So all this is to excuse why my Cranberry Clementine Sauce recipe is coming the morning of Thanksgiving when anyone celebrating this holiday already has their cranberry sauce well and truly sorted. But hey, it’s lucky I live in London as we don’t need our cranberry sauce until Christmas Day so with those timings in mind I am super organised.

I had never been terribly bothered about the inclusion of cranberry sauce at Christmas until I began making my own. The syrupy sweet congealed sauce that is dolloped obligingly out of a jar is light years away from the ruby red zesty rich cranberry sauce made with fresh cranberries, a touch of citrus and a whisper of spices.

Homemade Cranberry Clementine Sauce is also one of the easiest ways to take your festive feast to another level. It adds more than just sweetness to your plate as it seems to make everything taste fresher somehow. Since I began making it myself I have become a little obsessed with the stuff and now deem it a non-negotiable accompaniment to most of my meals throughout November and December. This recipe also keeps really well and I load up the fridge with jars so I still have plenty to delve into well into next year.

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Homemade Cranberry Clementine Sauce is the perfect accompaniment to the festive turkey. The bright shiny flavours are enhanced by a touch of spice.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time25 mins
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: British
Keyword: cranberry clementine sauce, cranberry clementine sauce recipe
Servings: 8 people
Calories: 90kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 150 ml caster sugar
  • 120 ml water
  • 300 g fresh cranberries
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • zest of 1 clementine

Instructions

  • Pour the water and sugar into a saucepan and simmer for 5-10 minutes until the sugar has dissolved.
  • Add the cranberries and simmer for 5-10 minutes, stirring well. Once the cranberries are just beginning to break down then remove from the heat and stir in the spices and clementine zest.
  • Chill the sauce until needed.

Notes

I find this Cranberry Clementine Sauce keeps for an inordinately long time in the fridge since the sugar syrup preserves the sauce very well. You can easily make this sauce weeks in advance, although there’s no guarantee there’ll be any left for Christmas Day if you do that.
I have also had great success in canning this Cranberry Clementine Sauce via the water bath method to ensure extra longevity. After all, I still want to be eating my cranberry sauce well into June next year.
This recipe was adapted from a cookery class I attended many years ago at Divertimenti Cookery School in London. I have long since lost any details regarding the original writer of this recipe or which cookery class it was exactly I attended. It’s a pretty safe bet it was some sort of a Christmas cookery class though.

Nutrition

Calories: 90kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 31mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 20g | Vitamin A: 0.5% | Vitamin C: 6% | Calcium: 0.3% | Iron: 0.5%

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Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad

Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad combines sweetly caramelised roasted butternut squash, cream and cooling goats cheese with fruity muscat grapes with a garlicky blackberry vinaigrette. A fully satisfying salad as a main meal or a delicious accompaniment as part of a larger meal.

Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad

So the full title of this salad is Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad with Radicchio, Sorrel, Muscat Grapes and Garlicky Blackberry Vinaigrette which would definitely have been the longest recipe title on the blog. Every ingredient is so important in this salad. Oh, and pumpkin seeds. Sorry pumpkin seeds – you know this salad wouldn’t be the same without your good time crunch. Oh, and the rocket – but he’s used to his time in the sun so I don’t feel too guilty about that.

So this is the salad that I have been chowing down on for weeks. I am in the zone. It all started when I chanced upon this year’s bounteous crop of radicchio and sorrel at the farmer’s market. I am an absolute sucker for the bitterness of radicchio and the lemon twang of sorrel, they both make salads so interesting. It’s such a shame that the supermarkets don’t stock more salad leaves individually so unless we are able to get to a good farmer’s market or grocers we are subject to a boring mix of floppy bland leaves whose fate will only ever be to wither and die in a corner of our fridges.

Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad

I think the reason this salad has worked so well for me these past few weeks is that it is so quick to put together, an absolute must since I rarely have more than ten minutes to make lunch and shovel it in whilst my eight-month old is amusing himself for a few moments smushing up his own lunch in his little fist and smearing it all over his face.

Since weaning Cole I have made it a thing to have several tubs of pre-roasted vegetables in my fridge so I can feed him quickly and efficiently but this has also proved invaluable for getting me back on track to a relatively balanced diet. As he’s eating breakfast or having a rare moment of independent play I will happily peel, de-seed, chop and roast a butternut squash or slam some quartered aubergines or courgettes in the oven. Preparing butternut squashes is one of my kitchen peeves but it doesn’t seem so bad if you are not doing it at the beginning of the long road to dinner.

I don’t know why I never thought to run my kitchen in such an organised fashion before, it has made tossing a lunch or dinner together so easy. I initially roast the veg without any salt (we’re in baby country now) or flavouring and then if I’m preparing my own dinner I can give them a 10 minute blast in the oven with all the spices and seasoning in the world and bob’s your bingo they are ready to go. I swear I think I have revolutionised meal prep in my kitchen forever more.

Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad

So all the leaves are torn, the goats cheese crumbled, the squash roasted with some shawarma spices, the heady sweet muscat grapes chopped and the pumpkin seeds are scattered so all that is left to do is the dressing.

Now, here’s where you’re going to feel a bit swizzed with this recipe since the key ingredient of my dressing is homemade blackberry vinegar – a really easy ingredient to source if you spend your late summers bottling vinegars, keeping them under the bed for the rest of the year. However, if you don’t do this then you really should. No, what I meant to say is that if you don’t do this then you might need to do a bit of a search in some specialist online food shops or beg a bottle off your local preserver. If there’s a WI near you, someone will be bottling their own fruit vinegars – guaranteed – and you needn’t be too fussy as any fruity vinegar will do in a pinch. The joy of them is that they imbue such a sweetly rounded flavour to the finished dressing so that all you really need to do is whisk in a bit of Dijon, some seasoning, garlic and then your olive oil.

Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad

The salad is absolutely lovely on its own and serves a good lunch for two, however if you wanted to use it as a side for a bit of grilled lamb or a roast chicken then you will be seriously pleased you did.

Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad

Spiced Roast Squash and Goats Cheese Salad combines sweetly caramelised roasted butternut squash, cream and cooling goats cheese with fruity muscat grapes with a garlicky blackberry vinaigrette
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time55 mins
Course: Salad
Cuisine: British
Keyword: roast squash and goat cheese salad, roast squash and goat cheese salad recipe
Servings: 2 people
Calories: 440kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • ½ small butternut squash peeled and cubed
  • ½ teaspoon shawarma spice blend
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 100 g goats cheese crumbled
  • large handful of radicchio roughly torn
  • small handful of sorrel roughly chopped
  • large handful of rocket
  • small handful muscat grapes halved
  • small handful of pumpkin seeds

For the dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons blackberry vinegar or any other fruity vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • ½ garlic clove crushed
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

  • Toss the butternut squash pieces with the spices, olive oil and a bit of seasoning and roast in an oven pre-heated to 170°C for about 20-25 minutes. When ready remove from the oven and leave to cool to room temperature whilst you prepare the rest of the salad.
  • In a large salad bowl throw together the goats cheese, radicchio, sorrel, rocket and grapes and set aside whilst you prepare the dressing.
  • Whisk the blackberry vinegar with the mustard and plenty of salt and pepper until smooth then add the garlic clove.
  • Keep whisking the dressing then drizzle in the olive oil slowly until the dressing has completely emulsified.
  • Add the butternut squash to the rest of the salad and then pour the dressing over using a judicious hand.
  • Finally serve, scattering the pumpkin seeds over as you do.

Nutrition

Calories: 440kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 11g | Fat: 39g | Saturated Fat: 11g | Cholesterol: 23mg | Sodium: 247mg | Potassium: 399mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 251.4% | Vitamin C: 28.9% | Calcium: 12.4% | Iron: 10.9%

SHOP THE RECIPE

For the shawarma seasoning blend I use Shawarma Seasoning. Middle East Spices. Their blends are fresh and flavourful and the shawarma spices work extremely well in this recipe.

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Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes are beautifully rich, tender and crisp. A really luxurious way to pamper your potatoes and your guests on special occasions.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

I first had these potatoes at the old Fire Engine House restaurant in Ely, Cambridgeshire where my in-laws live. It’s a lovely restaurant set in the old fire engine house (the name probably didn’t really need explaining). A small bar is situated in the front of the house in a little sitting room area with a roaring fire and gives the illusion that you are guest in somebody’s house. Somebody who is incredibly lucky with a fully stocked bar in their front room. When your table is ready you are led through the house, past the kitchen so you can have a good old nosy at the chefs and into the back dining room that leads out onto a pretty garden. The food is traditional but not the same old same old that is served boringly in gastropubs. All their produce is local, seasonal and all made in their lovely kitchen from the relishes to the jams that accompany the dishes. However where they really won my heart is when they came round just as we were finishing our mains and asked if we wanted seconds. Not only did that cater for my incredibly greedy nature but it also seconded the feeling that you were round at a friend’s house. A very well to do friend with a really fancy house. The staff could not have been more welcoming and when I said how delicious their roast potatoes were, well they told me the recipe.

I didn’t even realise good old faithful roast potatoes could be improved. I mean, I think they must be the most moreish food in existence, there is always room for another potato. This past year I eschewed all white potato in favour of sweet potato as I was living more or less a paleo lifestyle (that is if you don’t count the cake I was eating on a weekly basis) but recently I have re-introduced it to my diet and nothing is making me currently happier than my Sunday Roasts with a traditional roast white potato, crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.

This week I came across my scribbled notes that I had taken after dining at old Fire Engine House and was reminded of those flavour busting crisp yet creamy potatoes I had eaten by the truckload at the time.

 

It turns out that they are even more special than I had remembered and this time of year when we are preparing our most indulgent recipes for the festive season there is no excuse for not accompanying your turkey with these rich little beasts. The potatoes are cooked twice, first baked in cream, milk and garlic until they are soft and have absorbed most of the garlicky cream, then they are tipped into smoking hot fat and roasted for half an hour so that the cream bakes around the potato like a little crisp jacket, trapping all the flavour and soft texture that was captured during its initial bake.

They do take a little longer to cook than your average roast potato as I like to keep these ones whole but really they are no more bother as they pretty much sort themselves out in the oven. The end result is so worth it that I think you’ll have trouble going back to your usual boring roasties. Make sure you choose potatoes of a similar size to ensure even cooking so each one is as creamy to the fork as the next.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes are beautifully rich, tender and crisp.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time2 hrs
Total Time2 hrs 20 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: British
Keyword: cream baked roast potato recipe, cream baked roast potatoes
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 691kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 1 kg potatoes
  • 400 ml double cream
  • 400 ml whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 cloves
  • 5 black peppercorns
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 garlic cloves crushed with the back of a knife
  • 1 sprig of thyme
  • 50 ml olive oil

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 160°C.
  • Peel the potatoes then place into a large casserole dish.
  • Pour in the cream and milk and ensure the potatoes are fully submerged and then add the butter, bay leaves, cloves, black peppercorns, salt, garlic cloves and thyme.
  • Put the lid on the casserole dish and bake in the oven for 1½ hours until the potatoes are cooked all the way through.
  • Remove the dish from the oven then turn the heat up to 180°C.
  • Pour the olive oil into a roasting tray and place in the oven for 3 minutes for the oil to heat.
  • Then remove the potatoes from the cream with a slotted spoon and place gently into the hot oil of the roasting tray. Coat the potatoes with the oil and place in the oven to roast for 30 minutes, turning the potatoes halfway through.
  • Remove from the oven and serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 691kcal | Carbohydrates: 40g | Protein: 12g | Fat: 56g | Saturated Fat: 28g | Cholesterol: 155mg | Sodium: 423mg | Potassium: 1249mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 34.4% | Vitamin C: 36.6% | Calcium: 25.7% | Iron: 45.4%