Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Homemade Cranberry Clementine Sauce is the perfect accompaniment to the festive turkey. The bright shiny flavours are enhanced by a touch of spice.

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

It’s about time that I came clean here on the blog with what my deal is at the moment. A lot of my posts have been late, if they have been posted at all and my Gluten-Free Flour series went on a rather long sabbatical. If you follow my market stall then I basically opted out of late summer/early autumn then upped sticks to a completely different market.

Back in July I was ahead of the game, I had managed to carve out a good amount of time of pure recipe testing, writing and photography and had posts planned for about 6 weeks ahead. I was intending to return to posting twice a week to get through all the recipes I wanted to share and things I wanted to say before the year was out. It was all going swimmingly.

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Then I was struck down with both the most amazing news I had been wishing so hopefully for and the most debilitating morning sickness imaginable. Yes, I am expecting again and by goodness this new addition wanted my whole life to be put on hold whilst he settled into his temporary home for the next forty weeks. I could barely raise an arm out of bed, I couldn’t eat and when I did it was a huge mistake. All I was fit to do was sleep and my whole body felt wretched. Any ounce of energy I could dredge up from the depths went to ferrying Cole around to family, friends and nursery, anyone who could actually look after him whilst I went into complete hibernation and felt like the worst, most pathetic mother alive.

It took about 16 full weeks until I felt reasonably human. With the aid of my lovely husband I only managed to miss about 6 weeks of cake stalls. I had to change markets though to one much closer to home to suit my new exhausted and sickly state of being. Although this actually has turned out to be a great decision despite having to say goodbye to my lovely market at Tottenham Green. I’ve now had about a month of being okay, although of course with the next phase of pregnancy comes other challenges. However, I’m now well, eating healthily again and happy to be baking and preserving for all the festive markets on the horizon. Plus if you were reading with intent earlier in the post you’ll notice that we’re having another boy which fills me with so much excitement. Cole is simply the best little human in the world so to have two of those sounds like a dream. A dream in which the house is filled with double the amount of shouting, troublemaking, carnage, toy cars, fire engines, trains and Paw Patrol paraphernalia and where I am being constantly climbed on, grabbed, poked, pulled and run ragged. Wait, is that a dream or is it something else?

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

So all this is to excuse why my Cranberry Clementine Sauce recipe is coming the morning of Thanksgiving when anyone celebrating this holiday already has their cranberry sauce well and truly sorted. But hey, it’s lucky I live in London as we don’t need our cranberry sauce until Christmas Day so with those timings in mind I am super organised.

I had never been terribly bothered about the inclusion of cranberry sauce at Christmas until I began making my own. The syrupy sweet congealed sauce that is dolloped obligingly out of a jar is light years away from the ruby red zesty rich cranberry sauce made with fresh cranberries, a touch of citrus and a whisper of spices.

Homemade Cranberry Clementine Sauce is also one of the easiest ways to take your festive feast to another level. It adds more than just sweetness to your plate as it seems to make everything taste fresher somehow. Since I began making it myself I have become a little obsessed with the stuff and now deem it a non-negotiable accompaniment to most of my meals throughout November and December. This recipe also keeps really well and I load up the fridge with jars so I still have plenty to delve into well into next year.

Cranberry Clementine Sauce

Print Recipe
Cranberry Clementine Sauce
Homemade Cranberry Clementine Sauce is the perfect accompaniment to the festive turkey. The bright shiny flavours are enhanced by a touch of spice.
Cranberry Clementine Sauce
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
8 people
Ingredients
  • 150 ml caster sugar
  • 120 ml water
  • 300 g fresh cranberries
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • zest of 1 clementine
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
8 people
Ingredients
  • 150 ml caster sugar
  • 120 ml water
  • 300 g fresh cranberries
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • zest of 1 clementine
Cranberry Clementine Sauce
Instructions
  1. Pour the water and sugar into a saucepan and simmer for 5-10 minutes until the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Add the cranberries and simmer for 5-10 minutes, stirring well. Once the cranberries are just beginning to break down then remove from the heat and stir in the spices and clementine zest.
  3. Chill the sauce until needed.
Recipe Notes

I find this Cranberry Clementine Sauce keeps for an inordinately long time in the fridge since the sugar syrup preserves the sauce very well. You can easily make this sauce weeks in advance, although there’s no guarantee there’ll be any left for Christmas Day if you do that.

I have also had great success in canning this Cranberry Clementine Sauce via the water bath method to ensure extra longevity. After all, I still want to be eating my cranberry sauce well into June next year.

This recipe was adapted from a cookery class I attended many years ago at Divertimenti Cookery School in London. I have long since lost any details regarding the original writer of this recipe or which cookery class it was exactly I attended. It’s a pretty safe bet it was some sort of a Christmas cookery class though.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes are beautifully rich, tender and crisp. A really luxurious way to pamper your potatoes and your guests on special occasions.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

I first had these potatoes at the old Fire Engine House restaurant in Ely, Cambridgeshire where my in-laws live. It’s a lovely restaurant set in the old fire engine house (the name probably didn’t really need explaining). A small bar is situated in the front of the house in a little sitting room area with a roaring fire and gives the illusion that you are guest in somebody’s house. Somebody who is incredibly lucky with a fully stocked bar in their front room. When your table is ready you are led through the house, past the kitchen so you can have a good old nosy at the chefs and into the back dining room that leads out onto a pretty garden. The food is traditional but not the same old same old that is served boringly in gastropubs. All their produce is local, seasonal and all made in their lovely kitchen from the relishes to the jams that accompany the dishes. However where they really won my heart is when they came round just as we were finishing our mains and asked if we wanted seconds. Not only did that cater for my incredibly greedy nature but it also seconded the feeling that you were round at a friend’s house. A very well to do friend with a really fancy house. The staff could not have been more welcoming and when I said how delicious their roast potatoes were, well they told me the recipe.

I didn’t even realise good old faithful roast potatoes could be improved. I mean, I think they must be the most moreish food in existence, there is always room for another potato. This past year I eschewed all white potato in favour of sweet potato as I was living more or less a paleo lifestyle (that is if you don’t count the cake I was eating on a weekly basis) but recently I have re-introduced it to my diet and nothing is making me currently happier than my Sunday Roasts with a traditional roast white potato, crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.

This week I came across my scribbled notes that I had taken after dining at old Fire Engine House and was reminded of those flavour busting crisp yet creamy potatoes I had eaten by the truckload at the time.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

It turns out that they are even more special than I had remembered and this time of year when we are preparing our most indulgent recipes for the festive season there is no excuse for not accompanying your turkey with these rich little beasts. The potatoes are cooked twice, first baked in cream, milk and garlic until they are soft and have absorbed most of the garlicky cream, then they are tipped into smoking hot fat and roasted for half an hour so that the cream bakes around the potato like a little crisp jacket, trapping all the flavour and soft texture that was captured during its initial bake.

They do take a little longer to cook than your average roast potato as I like to keep these ones whole but really they are no more bother as they pretty much sort themselves out in the oven. The end result is so worth it that I think you’ll have trouble going back to your usual boring roasties. Make sure you choose potatoes of a similar size to ensure even cooking so each one is as creamy to the fork as the next.

Cream Baked Roast Potatoes

Print Recipe
Cream Baked Roast Potatoes
Cream Baked Roast Potatoes are beautifully rich, tender and crisp.
Cream Baked Roast Potatoes
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Servings
4 people
Ingredients
  • 1 kg potatoes
  • 400 ml double cream
  • 400 ml whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 cloves
  • 5 black peppercorns
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 garlic cloves crushed with the back of a knife
  • 1 sprig of thyme
  • 50 ml olive oil
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Servings
4 people
Ingredients
  • 1 kg potatoes
  • 400 ml double cream
  • 400 ml whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 cloves
  • 5 black peppercorns
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 garlic cloves crushed with the back of a knife
  • 1 sprig of thyme
  • 50 ml olive oil
Cream Baked Roast Potatoes
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 160°C.
  2. Peel the potatoes then place into a large casserole dish.
  3. Pour in the cream and milk and ensure the potatoes are fully submerged and then add the butter, bay leaves, cloves, black peppercorns, salt, garlic cloves and thyme.
  4. Put the lid on the casserole dish and bake in the oven for 1½ hours until the potatoes are cooked all the way through.
  5. Remove the dish from the oven then turn the heat up to 180°C.
  6. Pour the olive oil into a roasting tray and place in the oven for 3 minutes for the oil to heat.
  7. Then remove the potatoes from the cream with a slotted spoon and place gently into the hot oil of the roasting tray. Coat the potatoes with the oil and place in the oven to roast for 30 minutes, turning the potatoes halfway through.
  8. Remove from the oven and serve.

Pecan Treacle Tart

Pecan Treacle Tart

All of my recipe to-do lists at the moment seem to be filled with pies and tarts which is why you’re getting such an influx of them from me at the moment.

This recipe is a mish mash of Pecan Pie from across the way and a traditional British Treacle tart. It seemed to make complete sense to me to combine the best bits about both recipes for an ultimate sweet treat.

The actual recipes if you look at them are quite similar bar swapping the nuts and breadcrumbs around. The American recipe calls for dark molasses or corn syrup instead of our traditional golden syrup which I used here. However, I gave a nod to the intensely treacly flavour of the dark molasses by adding a smidge of black treacle which adds depth to the sweetness, giving our treacle tart a bit of backbone.

Pecan Treacle Tart

I also swapped half of our breadcrumbs for some roughly chopped pecans which gives the tart more texture and a flavour instead of boring bland breadcrumbs. Except that the breadcrumbs I’ve used are neither boring nor bland as I’ve taken a leaf out of several clever chef’s playbook and used brioche breadcrumbs. They are softer, sweeter and a hell of a lot more buttery.

Pecan Treacle Tart

Finally I’ve finished the tart filling off with a splash of lemon juice to cut through the richness and a tweak of vanilla extract just like they do in Pecan Pies.

This tart really is the ultimate, delicious warm with cream or at room temperature by itself as a mid-afternoon pick me up.

Pecan Treacle Tart

Pecan Treacle Tart

For the pastry:
270g plain flour
100g unsalted butter, fridge cold
100g caster sugar
pinch of salt
1 egg + 1 egg yolk
1 egg, lightly beaten for the egg wash

For the filling:
360g golden syrup
40g black treacle
pinch of salt
150ml double cream
1 egg
1 tbsp lemon juice
½ tsp vanilla
100g brioche breadcrumbs
75g pecans, toasted then roughly chopped plus extra for decorating on the top

  1. To begin with make your pastry. Take the butter out of the fridge and slice very finely with a sharp knife, then place in a large mixing bowl with the flour.
  2. Tear the butter up and coat thoroughly with the flour, then begin to rub gently between your fingertips until you reach very rough breadcrumbs, don’t take it too fine. It should take less than 5 minutes.
  3. Add the sugar, salt, egg and egg yolk then bring together into a dough. Tip it out onto the work surface and press together to form a ball. Wrap in baking parchment and chill in the fridge for 30 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile make the filling. Warm the syrup and black treacle with the salt, then tip into a large mixing bowl.
  5. Whisk in the double cream, then the egg.
  6. Add the breadcrumbs and the pecans, lemon juice and vanilla then set aside.
  7. Pre-heat the oven to 170°C.
  8. Remove the pastry from the fridge and roll out until it is about 3mm thick. Line the pastry into the bottom of the tin. The tin I used was 35cm x 11cm.
  9. Place some greaseproof paper on top of the pastry then pour baking beans on top.
  10. Place in the oven for 15 minutes to blind bake. Remove the baking beans, brush with the egg wash then place back in the oven for a further 5 minutes.
  11. Turn the oven down to 160°C.
  12. Stir the treacle mixture, then pour into the pastry. Place in the oven and bake for 35-40 minutes until the filling has set. Allow the tart to cool in the tin before cutting.