Easy Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins {gluten-free}

These Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins are incredibly moist and flavourful. Made with gluten-free rolled oats, almond flour and plenty of spice for the ultimate Autumn treat.

close up of Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins

My favourite recipes at the moment are the easiest. Maximum flavour and results for minimal time spent in the kitchen. Life is hectic and if you have a midweek craving for something home baked then these Easy Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins can be whipped up in no time.

Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins with maple icing on a wooden board

Why is this recipe so brilliant?

  • No complicated gluten-free flours, just rolled oats and almond flour for structure.

  • The muffins are so moist thanks to delicious full-bodied pumpkin puree.
  • No mixer required – just 2 bowls and a wooden spoon.
  • It’s naturally dairy-free.
  • The maple icing is literally the icing on the cake and takes 2 minutes to make – max!!

If you like the idea of no hard-to-find flours in your gluten-free bakes then have a look at these other uncomplicated recipes in these 11 Best Flourless Bakes.

Can I use tinned pumpkin puree?

Absolutely! I would advise nothing less. However, if you did want to go that extra step and make your own pumpkin puree then I love this easy to follow guide.

If you can’t get enough pumpkin this season then have a look at these recipes:

Toasted Marshmallow Spiced Pumpkin Cake
Pumpkin Pancakes with Almond Maple Syrup
Pumpkin Bread
Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies
Pumpkin Jam

How do you make these Easy Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins?

  1. Mix the dry ingredients together – oats, almond flour, spices, baking powder and saltMixing bowl with ingredients for Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins
  2. Mix the wet ingredients together – pumpkin puree, olive oil, sugar and eggs.Mixing bowl with ingredients for Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins
  3. Combine the dry ingredients with the wet ingredients. Beat well until completely combined.Mixing bowl with ingredients for Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins being mixed together
  4. Divide the muffin batter between 10 muffin cases and bake for 25 minutes.batter for pumpkin oatmeal muffins in muffin tin ready for the oven
  5. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.close up of Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins
  6. Make the icing by mixing the icing sugar, maple syrup and milk. Drizzle over the cooled muffins.

close up of Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins

Baker’s Tips

  • Check the date on your spices. They shouldn’t really be kept for longer than 6 months for the freshest taste. So if you’re using last year’s then it’s time to re-stock.
  • Also check your muffin cases. If you bought them a while ago and haven’t kept them in their original container they can open out too much. This can mean that they separate from the muffins once baked.
  • As soon as your muffins have baked then remove them from the muffin tin. If they are left to sit the muffins sit in their own moisture and can get a little wet.
  • If you overdo the liquid in the icing so it’s a little more runny than you would like, do not worry. Just let the icing sit for 10 minutes and give another stir. The icing will have thickened slightly – hopefully more to the consistency you desire.

overview of Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins on a wooden board

That Maple Icing!

You don’t need to ice your muffins. They are perfectly delicious without. However, you won’t look back once you do. It’s super easy, flavourful and just three ingredients:

  • Icing sugar
  • Maple syrup
  • Splash of milk (non-dairy if you prefer)

Plus I love the slight crack of it when you bite down on your muffin once the icing has set.

Flavour Variations

  • Switch up the pumpkin puree for butternut squash or even pureed sweet potato. How delicious!!
  • Chocolate Chips – I mean, no explanation is necessary.
  • Diced Stem Ginger – If you like a little more spice then adding this into the mix would be insanely good. See here for my Homemade Stem Ginger recipe.

close up of Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins

Can you freeze these Easy Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins?

Yes, iced or un-iced – it’s up to you.

How long can you keep Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins?

They taste their best up to 3 days after baking. Store in an air-tight tin to keep their freshness.

If you make these Easy Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Easy Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins {gluten-free}

These Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins are incredibly moist and flavourful. Made with gluten-free rolled oats, almond flour and plenty of spice for the ultimate Autumn treat.These Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins are incredibly moist and flavourful. Made with gluten-free rolled oats, almond flour and plenty of spice for the ultimate Autumn treat.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: British
Servings: 10 muffins
Calories: 345kcal

Ingredients

  • 250 g pumpkin puree
  • 200 g light brown muscovado sugar
  • 100 ml light olive oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 160 g rolled gluten-free oats
  • 80 g almond flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Maple Icing

  • 100 g icing sugar
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon milk of your choice

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas mark 4.
  • Pour the pumpkin puree, sugar, olive oil and eggs in a large mixing bowl and beat together until smooth.
  • Whisk the oats, almond flour, baking powder, spices and salt together in a separate large mixing bowl until thoroughly combined.
  • Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until well combined.
  • Divide the batter into 10 muffin cases and bake in the oven for 22-25 minutes.
  • Remove the muffins from the oven and immediately transfer to a cooling rack.
  • Make the icing by whisking together the icing sugar, maple syrup and milk.
  • Drizzle 1 teaspoon of icing over each of the cooled muffins.

Notes

  • By all means use tinned pumpkin puree, I do.
  • Check the date on your spices. For the freshest taste they should be replaced every 6 months.
  • Check your muffin cases. If they are a bit ancient they tend to open out a bit which means they can come away from your muffins once baked.
  • As soon as your muffins have baked then remove from the tin to avoid excess moisture in your muffins.
  • Let your icing sit for 10 minutes if it's a little more runny than you'd like, it will thicken a little as it rests.
  • You can freeze these muffins iced or un-iced.
  • Store the muffins up to 3 days in an air tight container. 

Nutrition

Calories: 345kcal | Carbohydrates: 48g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 16g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 33mg | Sodium: 139mg | Potassium: 278mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 33g | Vitamin A: 3938IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 113mg | Iron: 2mg

Pumpkin Jam

Pumpkin Jam makes the most out of squash season, lusciously smooth, rich with savoury pumpkin notes and scented lightly with vanilla and nutmeg for a comforting Autumn preserve.

overhead shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins

This year, due to being on maternity leave, I have completely taken a break from producing any preserves for the market stall. I return to the market stall next weekend and know I am going to seriously regret this decision as my stall won’t look as plump or lively without the mountains of jars interspersed between all the cake. Plus I really love selling the preserves.

overhead shot of pumpkins

The best part about making the jams, chutneys, ketchups and sauces for the stall is coming up with really fun and unexpected flavours which are always so delicious and fun to talk about with my customers. Plus it’s the one area of my business that Luke gets really involved in so it is something we can do together. He is just as passionate as me about the ingredients and loves to help me source them. As a family we adore foraging and a lot of my jams are either made from produce foraged locally in North London or from local producers, usually from our friends at the market. Luke gave me the inspiration to develop this recipe for Pumpkin Jam last year when my jam stock was dwindling. I make my jams in very small batches so once it’s gone, it’s gone until the next year and with new seasons comes new flavours.

The farmers market at this time of year always has an abundance of pumpkin and mixed squash and as soon as he had given me the idea to look outside the confines of fruit I couldn’t wait to try out Autumn’s bounty. Obviously the Pumpkin Jam was hugely successful or I wouldn’t be sharing the recipe with you today. It’s one of the few preserves that I have made for personal use this year as I just couldn’t let squash season pass us by without a few jars of Pumpkin Jam to keep us going.

side on shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins

Like all jam, its uses shouldn’t just stop at toast and crumpets. I use jam mostly for filling a Victoria Sponge or as an accompaniment to cheese. Believe me, this pumpkin jam goes particularly well with a mature cheddar. Try jam smeared onto your pork chops or chicken breasts before grilling or as a sweetener in sauces.

Although I have to confess that I didn’t just stop at pumpkin in this jam. Instead I used a variety of mixed squash which imbues the jam with many levels of flavour. I decided against adding cinnamon to this Pumpkin Jam. Sacrilege I know. I literally had to hold my hand back from automatically picking up the cinnamon jar. But I’m glad I did as the cinnamon would have interfered too much with the deep notes of the pumpkin. To compliment the squash I added just a hint of vanilla and nutmeg which turned out to be exactly the right thing to do.

overhead shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins

Time will tell whether I’ll be able to bring the preserves back next year but in the meantime I probably won’t be able to resist making my gorgeous mincemeats and cranberry sauce for Christmas. However, until I decide exactly what I’m going to do about the preserves on the stall moving forward, at least I’ll have my own personal Pumpkin Jam for company.

Pumpkin Jam

Pumpkin Jam is lusciously smooth, rich with savoury pumpkin notes and scented lightly with vanilla and nutmeg for a comforting Autumn preserve.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time50 mins
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: British
Servings: 48 servings
Calories: 34kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 kg fresh pumpkin puree*
  • 1 kg jam sugar
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 vanilla bean seeds scraped out
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg

Instructions

  • Pour the pumpkin puree into a large preserving pan. Turn onto a gentle heat and begin to warm the puree, stirring to avoid burning on the bottom of the pan.
  • Once the puree has heated up then pour in the jam sugar, orange juice, lemon juice, salt, vanilla bean seeds and nutmeg.
  • Stir everything together and turn up the heat to dissolve the sugar.
  • Bring to a rolling boil, making sure to stir the bottom of the pan frequently so the jam doesn’t stick. It should take 5-10 minutes from then to reach setting point.
  • Once the jam reaches 104°C or passes the saucer wrinkle test* then decant into sterilised jars*.

Notes

*You can use just pumpkin puree or a variety of mixed squash to reach 1kg
*The saucer wrinkle test basically requires you to put about 5 saucers in your freezer when you begin making your jam. Once you think the jam might be ready then you can double check by removing a saucer from the freezer, dropping a teaspoon of jam on it then placing the saucer in the fridge. After about 30 seconds remove the saucer and push the jam with your finger. If it wrinkles up it’s ready, if it just pools back into the space your finger has left then it needs more bubbling time. Boil it a bit longer, then test again with another saucer.
*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.
Yield 8 180ml jars

Nutrition

Calories: 34kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 57mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 3240IU | Vitamin C: 0.9mg | Calcium: 7mg | Iron: 0.4mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

You don’t need much equipment for jam making but there are a few bits and pieces I rely upon.

My favourite way to make my small batch jams is in my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue. It’s very heavy duty but I use it for absolutely everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.

A jam funnel is essential and I use this cheap and cheerful KitchenCraft Home Made Stainless Steel Jam Funnel

You will soon wonder how you got by without using jam jar tongs which means you can pick up piping hot jars confidently. I love these Kilner Jam Jar Sterilising Tongs, Steel, Silver/Red, 6 x 10 x 24 cm

This post is not sponsored but the links above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to click through to buy then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Seedless Wild Blackberry Lime Jam

A jar of Wild Blackberry Lime Jam with a spoon in it and the ingredients surrounding

Baked Apple Butter

Baked Apple Butter is the perfect hybrid between a jam and a chutney. The apples are stewed in cider, brandy, honey and spices then smoothed and baked slowly in a low oven for the most intensely thick and rich apple sauce that is the ultimate Autumn preserve.

Pear and Cobnut Jam

Pear and Cobnut Jam

Toasted Marshmallow Spiced Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake. Layered gluten-free spiced pumpkin cake filled with a brown butter pumpkin buttercream and covered in marshmallow clouds.

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

The season starts here. This week I feel officially heralds the beginning of Christmas and for me it starts with two lovely celebrations, my birthday and my wedding anniversary. Before Cole we would usually go away for this week to some fancypants hotel and this year we tossed around the idea for about five minutes. Then I remembered I was pregnant, exhausted and couldn’t face organising my way to Sainsburys let alone anything more elaborate.

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

So, instead I’ll celebrate the best way I know how, with cake. And what better cake than the one I have been enjoying making and eating the most during these chillier months. This Toasted Marshmallow Spiced Pumpkin Cake is an absolute triumph. The pumpkin cake is so moist and delicious with so many layers of flavour thanks to all the spices and array of gluten-free flours.

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

It is teamed with a simple fluffy marshmallowy meringue which is the perfect texture and its smooth flavour is the perfect foil for the busy pumpkin sponge. Although one of the best parts about this cake is surely the brown butter pumpkin buttercream which is rich, caramelly and creamy with plenty of full pumpkin flavour.

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Toasted Marshmallow Spiced Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Toasted Marshmallow Pumpkin Cake. Layered gluten-free spiced pumpkin cake sandwiched with a brown butter pumpkin buttercream filling and covered with toasted marshmallow clouds.
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time40 mins
Total Time1 hr 40 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: British
Servings: 12 people
Calories: 697kcal

Ingredients

Spiced Pumpkin Cake

  • 500 g light brown sugar
  • 280 g unsalted butter melted then cooled
  • 5 eggs
  • 425 g pumpkin puree
  • teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 110 g sweet rice flour
  • 80 g oat flour
  • 65 g millet flour
  • 35 g potato flour
  • 30 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • teaspoons cinnamon
  • teaspoons ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice

Toasted Marshmallow

  • 7 egg whites 210g
  • 350 g caster sugar
  • A pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Brown Butter Pumpkin Buttercream

  • 175 g unsalted butter
  • 150 g of the marshmallow frosting
  • 5 tablespoons pumpkin puree
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of salt

Instructions

Spiced Pumpkin Cake

  • Pre-heat the oven to 160°C and line and grease two 8x4 inch round cake tins.
  • Blend together the sugar and butter until thick and well combined.
  • Add the eggs one at a time, then the vanilla extract.
  • Pour in the pumpkin puree and mix well.
  • Sift together the rest of the dry ingredients, then add to the pumpkin mixture until just combined.
  • Divide the batter between the two cake tins and bake for 35–40 minutes until an inserted cocktail stick comes out clean.

Toasted Marshmallow

  • Heat egg whites and caster sugar in a bain marie, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved and the temperature has reached 71°C.
  • Remove the egg whites and sugar from the heat and pour into a stand mixer with whisk attachment. Whisk until the mixture forms stiff peaks.
  • Set aside 325g to create the toasted marshmallow and leave the rest in the mixer to make the brown butter pumpkin buttercream.

Brown Butter Pumpkin Buttercream

  • To make the brown butter, start work a good few hours before you intend to make the buttercream. Place the butter in a saucepan and heat over a medium flame. The butter will melt. Listen carefully and the butter will start hissing and cracking and forming little brown bits at the bottom of the pan. You want to wait until the noises start to subside, the butter smells toasty and is turning a darker colour. Remove from the heat as soon as it’s ready so it doesn’t begin to burn. Pour the butter into a heatproof container and chill in the fridge for a few hours until it solidifies to the consistency of room temperature butter.
  • Cut the butter into cubes, then when you are ready to make the buttercream, add the browned butter one cube at a time into the food mixer which has the rest of the beaten egg white and sugar mixture leftover from making the marshmallow and beat the butter into the egg whites with the paddle attachment until a smooth velvety buttercream has formed.
  • Add the pumpkin puree, vanilla extract and salt and beat until completely combined.

Assembly

  • Place one of the sponge layers on a cake board and spread the brown butter pumpkin buttercream filling on top of the cake, smoothing evenly with a palette knife.
  • Place the second sponge layer on top and cover the top and the sides of the cake with the marshmallow.
  • Toast the marshmallow with a blowtorch.

Nutrition

Calories: 697kcal | Carbohydrates: 94g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 33g | Saturated Fat: 20g | Cholesterol: 149mg | Sodium: 430mg | Potassium: 339mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 71g | Vitamin A: 7530IU | Vitamin C: 1.9mg | Calcium: 101mg | Iron: 1.9mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

The cake tins I always use are these PME Anodised Aluminium Round Cake Pan 8 x 4-Inch Deep which are wonderful as they have completely straight sides so your cakes will be beautifully neat, the anodised aluminium means the heat disperses evenly throughout the cake without cooking the sides too quickly, which some darker cake tins do. The cakes slip out of the tins easily and they come in all the sizes you would need, although typically I use the 8 inch tins.

I love these Kitchen Craft Paul Hollywood 2-Tier Stackable Wire Cooling Rack, 40 x 26 x 35 cm (16″ x 10″ x 14″), don’t be put off that they are part of the Paul Hollywood range as they are actually really useful as they are nice and high which allow more air to get to your cakes to cool quickly. Some cooling racks are too close to the kitchen counter which traps in more moisture as the cakes are cooling down which could lead to a wetter sponge. These are great.

You need to use a double boiler or bain marie to make the marshmallow and this KitchenCraft Induction-Safe Stainless Steel Double Boiler Porringer/Bain-Marie Pan, 16 cm (6.5″) is perfect. Double boilers are way more useful than you think they are going to be. I use one every time I melt chocolate, make a curd, butter sauce or indeed swiss meringue.

For checking the temperature of your egg white sugar syrup when making your marshmallow don’t be without a Classic SuperFast Thermapen 3 professional food thermometer in grey colour It gives quick and accurate temperature readings meaning you can don’t have to guess at any temperatures when making candy, caramel, tempering chocolate or fancy buttercreams. I use mine all the time.

I put off buying a chef’s blowtorch for so long as it seemed another kitchen gadget that would take up unnecessary space in my kitchen but once I took the plunge I didn’t look back. Absolutely essential for toasted marshmallow and meringue toppings and creme brulee. Plus really good fun to use. I love this MasterClass Deluxe Gas Kitchen Blow Torch in my kitchen, it does the job really well.

It’s not easy to buy certified gluten-free sweet rice flour in the UK, for some reason Bob’s Red Mill is astronomically expensive. However I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

Oat flour can be picked up at most health food shops and if I run out that’s where I head to. However, like all alternative flours it can be expensive so I find the most economical way is to buy it online. I go through bags of the stuff as it’s the flour I use most regularly so I like to buy in bulk. My favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4) at a reasonable price. Even better if you go the subscribe and save option.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

Some of the links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy anything using the links then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

Salted Caramel Chocolate Espresso Cake {gluten-free}

This gluten-free Salted Caramel Chocolate Espresso Cake is one of my favourite cakes from the cake stall. A chocolate lover’s sponge sandwiched together with silky salted caramel swiss meringue buttercream and drizzled with thick luscious salted caramel.

Pumpkin Pancakes with Almond Maple Syrup

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread

A deliciously moist Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread, made with brown butter and alternative flours for an earthy nutty flavour and unbeatable chew.

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

These gluten-free Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies are soft and slightly chewy with oats, sweetened only with maple syrup and bejewelled with dates.

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

I had no idea what these cookies would turn out like. I made them with Cole and no recipe so I presumed disaster would ensue. I stood him on his kitchen stool at the worktop in his little apron which he’s so proud to wear and took a bunch of ingredients out of the cupboards and fridge that needed using up. It was luck that I usually have half a tin of pumpkin puree lurking in the fridge these days since I’m making a lot of pumpkin cakes for the stall and for café orders. Pumpkin cookies, flavoured with lovely warming spices and paired with oats seemed like a standout choice for our baking adventure. I’m also being vigilant about keeping a stash of medjool dates to hand in my larder as they come in useful for so many bakes, Easy Overnight Coconut Chia Puddings, beautiful tagines and the odd snack here and there. I couldn’t resist putting a few of these chopped little nuggets into the mix.

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

Since I was making these cookies with Cole I decided not to use refined sugar. It’s debatable whether maple syrup is technically any healthier since sugar really is just sugar but I felt more of a responsible mother giving my toddler maple sweetened cookies. Plus who am I kidding, I was the one who ate the lion’s share of these cookies and a little bit less refined sugar in my diet is only going to be better for me.

Cole’s main job when we’re baking together is to stir and taste. I haven’t officially given him the role of taster, it’s one he’s bestowed upon himself. After every ingredient is added into the bowl he insists on making sure it is the right call, no matter if it’s the raw eggs or vanilla extract. It might have gone a bit far when he was shovelling wooden spoonfuls of flour, oats and spices into his mouth. At least he knew better to scrape them from his tongue than to try and swallow this time. An improvement from the cocoa powder incident a couple of months ago which led to me frantically pour streams of water down his throat to ease his choking. Special times.

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

Cookies are great for baking with a toddler since they are really just an assembly and mixing job with a bowl and wooden spoon, ideal for a child who loves to stir. They are so quick to bake and after ten minutes or so of cooling they are ready to eat. Instant gratification.

When it came time for the final taste test I was completely bowled over at how delicious the cookies actually were. Not at all the calamity I had anticipated. It’s always the way that your best efforts are when you’re not really trying, either that or Cole is an absolute baking prodigy and he’ll be taking over the market stall from me by the time he’s four.

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

I’ve made these cookies a few times since, tweaking the recipe here and there but every time I have come to the conclusion that the cookies that Cole and I made together that first time were the most delicious. They were probably not the most photogenic since I gave Cole free rein with the cookie scoop to drop them onto the baking sheet but the taste was all there from the beginning.

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies have become a little bit of a staple in our house over the past two weeks, I have been nibbling on them for breakfast, mid-morning and mid-afternoon snacks. They are pretty good whenever to be honest. It’s also pretty handy knowing what to do with that half eaten tin of pumpkin puree.

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies {gluten-free}

Spiced Pumpkin Date Cookies are soft and slightly chewy with oats, sweetened only with maple syrup and bejewelled with dates.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Snack
Cuisine: British
Servings: 15 cookies
Calories: 169kcal

Ingredients

  • 125 g gluten-free oats
  • 75 g sweet rice flour
  • 50 g ground almonds
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 170 g pumpkin puree
  • 75 g dates stoned and chopped finely
  • 125 g butter melted
  • 100 g maple syrup
  • zest 1 orange + 2 tablespoons of its juice
  • 1 egg lightly beaten

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 170°C and line a large baking sheet with greaseproof paper.
  • In a large bowl sift together the oats, sweet rice flour, almond flour, bicarbonate of soda and spices.
  • In another bowl mix the pumpkin puree, dates, melted butter, maple syrup, orange zest and juice and the egg.
  • Pour the flour mixture into the pumpkin mixture and stir well until completely combined.
  • Using an ice cream scoop with a trigger action, scoop up balls of cookie dough and release the dough onto the baking sheet an inch or so apart.
  • Flatten the cookies slightly with the back of a fork before putting them in the oven to bake for 13-15 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven, let rest on the baking tray for 5 minutes then transfer to a cooling rack to finish cooling.

Nutrition

Calories: 169kcal | Carbohydrates: 19g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 28mg | Sodium: 138mg | Potassium: 109mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 1990IU | Vitamin C: 0.5mg | Calcium: 28mg | Iron: 0.8mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

There are two items in my kitchen which are invaluable when baking cookies. A good cookie dough scoop (or ice cream scoop) is one of them. So handy for scooping up a perfect ball of cookie dough for the perfectly sized cookie. Also so useful when baking cupcakes and ensures a perfectly even cupcake bake every time. I use the OXO Good Grips Trigger Ice Cream Scoop which is really durable and an ideal size.The other brilliant piece of equipment which I’ve never regretted buying is a really decent hard-wearing baking tray which I use for all my cookies and scones. I use this KitchenCraft MasterClass Large Non-Stick Baking Tray, Grey, 39 x 27 cm which considering how often I use it is still in excellent condition, fits in the oven nicely and is large enough to hold a whole batch of scones or cookies.Some of the links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy anything using the links then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Peanut Butter Oaty Chocolate Cookies {gluten-free, dairy-free}

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread

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Pumpkin Pancakes with Almond Maple Syrup

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Pumpkin Pancakes with Almond Maple Syrup {gluten-free}

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup for a really special bank holiday brunch.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Pumpkin Pancakes, I am all in. Let’s go, just you and me. We can run away right now. I’ll pack the Almond Maple Syrup as that is really all we need and we can forget the world. Forget physio appointments, nursery pick-ups, laundry, taking the dog to the vet. Leave it all behind. Come on, what are we waiting for?

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple SyrupI’m pretty excited by this recipe as it includes all my current favourite ingredients, tinned pumpkin, coconut milk, almond butter and maple syrup. At the moment I am trying to squeeze all the above into every recipe I create. Muffins, check. Layer cake, check. Chocolate truffles!! Check, check and check some more. I am aware that pumpkin is perhaps more of an autumn predilection than the beginning of Spring but I am in love goddammit and love cannot wait for the right season.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Luke and I have been talking recently about making more of the holidays. We are often caught up in our own bubble, he works like crazy during the week as I look after Cole who is delightfully engaged with toddlerdom and all the mischief (read: tantrums) that entails. Then I work at the markets at the weekend which doesn’t leave us much time together as a family, just enjoying each other’s company.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

When the calendar suddenly informs us that it is Mother’s Day, May Bank Holiday, Easter, we are often caught by surprise and scrabble around to try and make something of the day. We decided we need to be a bit more organised in carving out time for our family on these dates. Back in the days when laziness seemed the aim of the game at weekends and holidays we used to scoff at those that took these calendar dates so seriously. Bah to Valentines Day, we love each other all year round. As time has become more sacred though it’s hard to remember how to take care of each other in the every day and I don’t think it hurts to allow the calendar to nudge us in the direction of family every now and then.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

This weekend Tottenham Green Market is taking a last minute Easter Break due to London disappearing over the bank holiday so I’ve been left with an incredibly welcome weekend off. Now I’ve got Easter Sunday ahead of me I wish I had been more organised, taken the day off anyway and planned a big family lunch, the kind we used to have when we were children, with roast lamb and Easter eggs galore. Still, it’s not too late for us to make last minutes Easter plans with family this weekend and resolve to be a little better with our planning for the next holiday.

Of course all this talk about family is completely by the by as I’ve already said I’m absconding with my Pumpkin Pancakes the second this post is published.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

These are particularly special pancakes and I have already made them several times for breakfast which is a little unusual for me as my sweet tooth normally doesn’t kick in until after lunch. Although to reserve these pancakes just for brunch seems unfair when really your day would be much improved to substitute them in for every single meal.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

This was my first time baking with gram flour (chickpea flour) and I had heard warnings that the flavour can tend to overtake the rest of the ingredients but it works incredibly well here. The flavour definitely comes through but it marries so happily with everything else that I am completely won over by using it judiciously in my gluten-free baking from now on. Plus I’ve paired it with oat flour and the combo really works.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

These Pumpkin Pancakes are so fluffy and rich with flavour, there is not an ingredient in there which is just filler. They take mere minutes to prepare in blender, 10 minutes until all the pancakes are cooked and then once you drizzle over the (two-ingredient!) Almond Maple Syrup, well you can just retire on that prospect right there. The pancakes are great, so good in fact but with the syrup, they are wondrous. Pumpkin Pancakes with Almond Maple Syrup, I love you.

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup

Pumpkin Pancakes with Almond Maple Syrup {gluten-free}

Gluten-free Pumpkin Pancakes, so thick and fluffy and smothered with Almond Maple Syrup.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: British
Servings: 4 large pancakes
Calories: 410kcal

Ingredients

  • 60 g gram flour
  • 60 g oat flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 120 g tinned pumpkin puree
  • 120 ml coconut milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1-2 tablespoons coconut oil

for the almond maple syrup:

  • 5 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons almond butter

Instructions

  • In a large bowl sift together the flours, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, cinnamon and salt and set aside for a moment.
  • Place the pumpkin puree, coconut milk, eggs, maple syrup and vanilla extract into a blender and whizz until smooth.
  • Pour in all the dry ingredients and blend again until smooth.
  • Heat up 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil in a skillet and pour in a quarter of the pancake batter (about 100g). Heat for 3-4 minutes until the underside is golden brown. Turn the pancake over and cook on the other side for a couple more minutes until golden brown. Remove the pancake from the skillet, pat dry with kitchen towel to remove the excess oil.
  • Repeat the process with the 3 other pancakes, adding more coconut oil to the skillet if needed.
  • For the almond maple syrup, warm the maple syrup and almond butter together in a small saucepan until smooth and runny. Add a small splash of water if you would like to make the syrup a little more runny. Serve over the warm pancakes.

Nutrition

Calories: 410kcal | Carbohydrates: 46g | Protein: 12g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 10g | Cholesterol: 82mg | Sodium: 337mg | Potassium: 700mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 21g | Vitamin A: 4790IU | Vitamin C: 1.6mg | Calcium: 202mg | Iron: 3.7mg

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread

This Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread made with alternative flours and without xanthan gum is the most moist and delicious pumpkin bread you will eat this Autumn. Nutty with brown butter and encrusted with cinnamon sweetened pumpkin seeds for crunch, the alternative flours used not only make it gluten-free but deepen the flavour and give it a slight chew which is incredibly addictive. It’s also easy to make using a couple of mixing bowls and a wooden spoon for company.

A deliciously moist Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread, made with brown butter and alternative flours for an earthy nutty flavour and unbeatable chew.

You may begin to notice a bit of a difference in this blog and also my cake stall if you are planning on visiting me in the near future. Lately I have been completely converted to gluten-free baking. I feel it’s too early days to say whether the switch will be permanent but I’m finding working with alternative flours so exciting at the moment that I’m forging ahead with gusto.

A deliciously moist Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread, made with brown butter and alternative flours for an earthy nutty flavour and unbeatable chew.

I have spoken on my blog ad naseum about my relationship with gluten-free eating but I’ll just mention again, ignoring the groans, how it really helped my well-being, tiredness, bloating and daily nausea back when I changed my eating habits. However, this has been a contradiction to how I have always baked. I love to bake, I have great feedback from my cakes and indeed earn money from them. Even though about a quarter of my cake stall has always been gluten-free, I have been reluctant to convert to a 100% gluten-free business, knowing I would be leaving behind beloved recipes and perhaps alienating my customer base.

A deliciously moist Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread, made with brown butter and alternative flours for an earthy nutty flavour and unbeatable chew.

However, my baking indulgences have been veering more and more towards the use of alternative flours. I don’t mean the gluten-free all-purpose blends you can buy, which I certainly don’t sniff at as they are in constant use in my kitchen and used in several of my cakes. However, I think to rely on just that blend is reductive to the possibilities of gluten-free baking. I have been reading about, playing with and doing a great amount of tasting recently and have been astounded by the sheer variety of flours out there which all behave and taste utterly different.

A comment which really resonated with me came in the introduction to Alanna Taylor-Tobin’s Alternative Baker where she talks about a conversation she had with her husband over a wheat flour cupcake. It wasn’t the gluten they had the issue with but the blandness of it. It’s true, baking with these Flavor Flours as Alice Medrich terms them in her book of the same name adds further interest to the bake and by choosing complimentary flours in your recipe you can really add resonance to the flavour.

A deliciously moist Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread, made with brown butter and alternative flours for an earthy nutty flavour and unbeatable chew.

Now, not all of these flours are not readily available in your local supermarket, although times are a-changing, but they are easy to get hold of if you have no problem with ordering off Amazon, or you have an Asian supermarket or a particularly on the button health food shop nearby. The flours individually are not too much more expensive that regular old plain flour but since you will be buying more than one and you will probably have to add delivery on top of that cost then this way of baking doesn’t come cheap. However, cake is a treat so do think of it like that if you are balking at the investment, plus since you will only be dipping into each bag these flours will be good for several cakes. And the results are so worth it, it almost goes without saying.

The ones I have chosen to help me out with my gluten-free pumpkin bread are:

Sweet Rice Flour
Also called glutinous rice flour, it doesn’t contain gluten and is not the same as ordinary white rice flour. It helps to bind the other flours together, adding moisture and a slight chew to the bake.

Sorghum Flour
This flour is bursting with an earthy nutty flavour. It has a great wholegrain texture which sits perfectly with the pumpkin and spices.

Millet Flour
I have used the millet flour here for bulking out the flour mix. It doesn’t have a strong taste so doesn’t overwhelm the finished bake.

Potato Starch
This adds lightness to the bake so the finished result doesn’t end up stodgy.

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You may not have a gluten-free diet, but dismissing these flours as a fad would be a shame since they can add so much to a baking repertoire. Plus, now I’ve discovered them, you might be seeing a lot more of them on this blog. If you can, I urge you to give this recipe a try, I really hope you notice the difference in this pumpkin bread which is so much more than you could ever think possible rather than just another pumpkin bread recipe.

A deliciously moist Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread, made with brown butter and alternative flours for an earthy nutty flavour and unbeatable chew.

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread

This Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread made with alternative flours and without xanthan gum is the most moist and delicious pumpkin bread you will eat this Autumn.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 20 mins
Course: Bread
Cuisine: British
Servings: 10 people
Calories: 421kcal

Ingredients

  • 400 g pumpkin puree I used tinned
  • 270 g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs medium
  • 160 g unsalted butter
  • 125 g sweet white rice flour
  • 110 g sorghum flour
  • 100 g millet flour
  • 65 g potato starch
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 30 g pumpkin seeds
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • pinch of cinnamon

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 170°C and line and grease a 9 inch loaf tin.
  • First you want to turn your butter into melted brown butter. Place the butter in a saucepan and heat over a medium flame. The butter will melt. Listen carefully and the butter will start hissing and cracking and forming little brown bits at the bottom of the pan. You want to wait until the noises start to subside, the butter smells toasty and is turning a darker colour. Remove from the heat as soon as it’s ready so it doesn’t begin to burn.
  • Pour the butter into a food mixer or large mixing bowl along with the pumpkin puree, sugar and eggs and beat until smooth.
  • In a separate bowl sift together the flours, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, spices and salt then add to the rest of the mix. Beat until well mixed.
  • Pour the batter into the baking tin and scatter the pumpkin seeds evenly over the top.
  • Bake for 55-60 minutes or until an inserted cocktail stick comes out clean.
  • Leave the pumpkin bread for 5 minutes to settle in the cake tin, then turn out onto a cooling rack and leave for a moment whilst you prepare the cinnamon syrup.
  • Pour the caster sugar, water and cinnamon into a small saucepan and turn the heat onto low. When the sugar has melted then turn the heat off and brush the syrup over the top of the pumpkin bread. Leave to cool completely before you slice and serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 421kcal | Carbohydrates: 64g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 17g | Saturated Fat: 9g | Cholesterol: 84mg | Sodium: 254mg | Potassium: 381mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 30g | Vitamin A: 6695IU | Vitamin C: 1.9mg | Calcium: 85mg | Iron: 2mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

Reading Alice Medrich’s Flavor Flours was an essential part of my gluten-free baking journey and is full of inspiring recipes using alternative and naturally gluten-free flours. It’s pretty much a gluten-free baking bible.

Similarly Alanna Taylor Tobin’s Alternative Baker is the book I often have open on my kitchen counter. Like me, the book eschews xanthan gum and focuses on beautiful recipes which are naturally gluten-free and the book is full of the most stunning food photography. An absolutely inspiring read.

It’s not easy to buy certified gluten-free sweet rice flour in the UK, for some reason Bob’s Red Mill is astronomically expensive. However I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

Some of the links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy anything using the links then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may also like:

Gluten-Free Flours: An Introduction

Sweet Rice Flour

Toasted Marshmallow Spiced Pumpkin Cake {gluten-free}

Easiest Gluten-Free Banana Bread