Steamed Chocolate Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard is the ultimate in pudding decadence. Warm and sticky gluten-free chocolate pudding steamed on the stove top then served with lashings of rich chocolate custard.

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

This Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard takes me right back to childhood. I have been craving it for weeks but my irritating lack of time lately has meant the recipe has just sat taunting me on my laptop every time I switch it on. It was a pudding which was on constant rotation during school dinners at my primary school and I have been longing to recreate it in my own kitchen. I went to a small country primary school of only a hundred children. The school itself was just one small building with no separate dining room. We would all be seated on large tables of about 10 children, laid out in the assembly room through to the three classrooms, which were all more or less open plan. The dinner ladies called up each table one by one to line up for our hot lunch served by two cooks who always looked harassed. One tall and stern and the other short and jolly. We stood patiently at the front of the assembly room as they stood behind their trolleys dolloping out food from metals trays and huge mason cash mixing bowls.

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

First we would line up for our main course and I’m sorry to say I can’t remember a single main meal that we had. Probably shepherds pie but after that I’m a bit stumped. I think it’s very clear where my allegiances lay even in those early days as the puddings I have no problems recalling. After our main meal had been cleared away each table would be called up again to line up for our pudding. Always hot and always served with custard so thick you could stand a spoon up in it.

There was spotted dick or vicarage pudding (which was pretty much the same as spotted dick) or treacle sponge with vanilla custard, jam roly poly with strawberry custard or the pudding every child revered, chocolate pudding with chocolate custard.

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

Chocolate custard isn’t something which you come across much these days. Pubs might serve a crumble with a bit of weak vanilla sauce if you’re lucky, the likes of which would be laughed out the door at Chilton Foliat Primary School. Proper nursery custard that has body and a life of its own outside its sponge or crumble accompaniment is little seen. Let alone the rarity of a strawberry or chocolate custard. And forget Bird’s custard (which I don’t have an issue with as such) but homemade custard with double cream, eggs and sugar is a five minute job and in another world of its own. Add a bit of cocoa powder to proceedings and chocolate custard will suddenly become the most important food discovery to emerge from your kitchen since toast.

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

This Chocolate Sponge Pudding is old school as well. Steamed in a pudding basin, the old fashioned way. Steamed puddings are few and far between these days but this Chocolate Pudding will encourage you to rediscover them. It is so quick to pull together, perhaps a little bit faffy to sort out the lid of the pudding basin and make sure you have a big stockpot large enough to fit it in, but really only five more minutes of prep time. It does steam for 1½ hours so a little longer than a sponge you might bang in the oven but really there is no bother and technically no baking involved so a great pudding if your oven is on the blink.

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

That’s not even to mention the sheer indulgence of the Chocolate Pudding itself. Sticky on the top from the rich ganache you cleverly nestled into the bottom of the basin which then soaked alluringly into the sponge during steaming. The pudding is moist and almost gooey in the centre and is the part you really want to get your spoon stuck into as you are serving it up. It’s an ideal pudding in my chocaholic frame of mind and utterly lives up to all of my cravings. Steamed Chocolate Pudding with Chocolate Custard is exactly what weekend puds are all about.

Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}

Print Recipe
Steamed Chocolate Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}
Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard is the ultimate in pudding decadence. Warm and sticky gluten-free chocolate pudding steamed on the stove top then served with lashings of rich chocolate custard.
Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1.5 hours
Servings
8 people
Ingredients
Chocolate Sponge Pudding
  • 100 g 70% dark chocolate
  • 100 g double cream
  • 2 teaspoons golden syrup
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 200 g soft light brown sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 80 g almond flour
  • 70 g sweet rice flour
  • 50 g oat flour
  • 60 g cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Chocolate Custard
  • 300 ml double cream
  • 100 ml whole milk
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 75 g soft light brown sugar
  • 20 g cocoa powder
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1.5 hours
Servings
8 people
Ingredients
Chocolate Sponge Pudding
  • 100 g 70% dark chocolate
  • 100 g double cream
  • 2 teaspoons golden syrup
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 200 g soft light brown sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 80 g almond flour
  • 70 g sweet rice flour
  • 50 g oat flour
  • 60 g cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Chocolate Custard
  • 300 ml double cream
  • 100 ml whole milk
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 75 g soft light brown sugar
  • 20 g cocoa powder
Steamed Chocolate Sponge Pudding with Chocolate Custard {gluten-free}
Instructions
Chocolate Sponge Pudding
  1. Prepare a 1.1lt pudding basin by placing a small circle of greaseproof paper into the bottom of the basin and greasing well.
  2. Melt the chocolate in a bain marie or a bowl over a simmering saucepan of water.
  3. Once melted stir in the double cream and golden syrup and pour into the bottom of the pudding basin. Set aside whilst you prepare the sponge.
  4. Cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
  5. Add the eggs one at a time and then the vanilla extract.
  6. Sift together the flours, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt then beat into the rest of the sponge mixture.
  7. Pour the sponge mixture into the pudding basin on top of the chocolate cream and smooth the top.
  8. Cut a large circle of greaseproof paper and tin foil to fit over the top of the basin with a very generous overlap. Lay the tin foil on top of the greaseproof paper then make a pleat in the centre of the two.
  9. Place the greaseproof paper/foil lid over the top of the basin, greaseproof paper down, and use string to secure the lid, tying the string just underneath the lip of the basin. Cut away the excess paper just underneath the string.
  10. Place a metal trivet or a folded up tea towel in the bottom of a large stockpot or saucepan and then place the pudding basin on top so that it doesn’t touch the bottom of the pot.
  11. Fill the pot halfway up the sides of the pudding basin with boiling water then place the lid on the pot. Bring the water up to boil then turn down to simmer for 1½ hours. Check the water level every so often to make sure it doesn’t boil dry.
  12. Once ready, remove the pudding basin carefully from the stockpot, remove the paper/foil lid and turn upside down onto a serving plate. Serve warm with plenty of custard.
Chocolate Custard
  1. To make the custard, first whisk together the egg yolks, sugar, cocoa powder and a drop of the cream to make a thick paste.
  2. Heat the cream up in a medium sized saucepan until just below boiling point then pour a small amount into the cocoa paste and whisk it in. Pour a little more hot cream in and then a little more, whisking all the while until all the cream has been added and the custard is smooth.
  3. Pour back into the saucepan and heat up until just boiling, whisking all the time.
  4. Remove from the heat and serve liberally over the chocolate pudding. I served mine with a little extra double cream poured over as well just to be audacious.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I love my Cornishware Blue and White Stripe Pudding Basin 1.1L 40oz which I use for all my steamed puddings, it’s so beautiful and sturdy and is about to really come into its own as I make my Christmas Pudding in the next couple of weeks.

The link above is an affiliate links which means if you decide you want to click through to buy then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. It’s just a way for me to fund the blog so if you do click through then many thanks!!

Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding {gluten-free}

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further in deliciousness by using teff flour instead of wheat flour.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the reason I am visiting old recipes and giving them the old gluten-free treatment. This pudding is positively invigorated by its re-invention. The teff flour used instead of plain wheat flour gives the sponge so much more complexity of flavour and compliments the spices wholeheartedly. There is no loss of texture either as the tapioca flour helps with the binding and ‘bounciness’ of the sponge.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

This is by far the best Sticky Toffee Pudding I have ever tasted. I have started making a version of it for the cake stall and it is a customer favourite.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

I originally posted this recipe using wheat flour on St Patrick’s Day three years ago. I think today’s Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is a far superior version so I’ve replaced it with this one and for posterity’s sake the words below are all from my original post in March 2014. Reading it made me a little wistful for the times where we did, as I mention below, nip to the local pub of an evening during the week for a glass of wine and supper to share our day’s news. A sleeping child upstairs scuppers this sort of carefree existence. A takeaway and an episode of Elementary is as good as it gets these days. Woe is us.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

“At your local pub you can rely on a few solid menu staples. Whether it’s sausage and mash, a chunky burger or steak and chips you know the kind of company you’ll be keeping with your pint. We are very lucky where we live in North London that we have two or three very good pubs which we can go to for a quick Saturday lunch, a slap up Sunday Roast or a mid-week life saver when we are both weary and want to sit down with a glass of wine and a quick supper to share our day’s news.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The sticky toffee pudding is one of the most prevalent stalwarts of the local English pub and can reliably be found propping up the odd Eton mess or lemon cheesecake on the dessert menu. Last week I steamed a traditional suet pudding, bringing a centuries old recipe to the table, but today I wanted to pay homage to a more current British classic. You would be forgiven, due to its ubiquity, for thinking that the sticky toffee pudding has been around since the Roman invasion. In fact it was only created in the 1970s by Francis Coulson to serve at The Sharrow Bay Country House Hotel in the Lake District. There is not much about this pudding I can tell you that you won’t already know; plump dates are added to a slightly spiced cake batter and drenched with a rich toffee sauce. I think you would be hard pressed to find any Englishman worth his salt who hasn’t partaken of the sticky toffee at the end of a hearty pub meal.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The only problem with our obsession with sticky toffee pudding is that it can be leaned on too much, with little room given to any other dessert options. Until recently I hadn’t bothered ordering a sticky toffee pudding for a few years, to say this particular pudding had been worn into the ground I had considered an understatement, especially since so many pubs serve a version which can only be described as subpar. I didn’t think there was much more this dessert could offer me and I was longing for a shake up of this national institution.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

However, last week I had a sticky toffee pudding at the Victoria Stakes at the bottom of Muswell Hill and it reminded me how comforting and homely it can be and immediately made me want to try my hand at home. This is always the sign that I have had a good meal.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

It’s St Patrick’s Day today so I wanted to Irish it up a bit. The Baileys is welcomed into this pudding like a long lost relative, giving even more creamy stickiness to the dates and as it peps up the toffee sauce it also removes some of the inherent sickliness. There is only one accompaniment to this pudding in my eyes and that is the best vanilla ice cream you can get hold of.”

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.
Print Recipe
Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding {gluten-free}
This British pub dessert is reinvigorated by Baileys which is baked into the sponge and also poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons.
The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
8-10 people
Ingredients
  • 225 g medjool dates stoned weight
  • 250 ml Baileys
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 175 g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 100 g teff flour
  • 50 g potato starch
  • 50 g white rice flour
  • 25 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • large pinch freshly grated nutmeg
For the Toffee Sauce:
  • 115 g unsalted butter
  • 75 g golden syrup
  • 40 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 140 ml double cream
  • 60 ml Baileys
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
8-10 people
Ingredients
  • 225 g medjool dates stoned weight
  • 250 ml Baileys
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 175 g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 100 g teff flour
  • 50 g potato starch
  • 50 g white rice flour
  • 25 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • large pinch freshly grated nutmeg
For the Toffee Sauce:
  • 115 g unsalted butter
  • 75 g golden syrup
  • 40 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 140 ml double cream
  • 60 ml Baileys
The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.
Instructions
  1. Place the dates, Baileys and vanilla extract in a blender and whizz up until it has formed a delicious paste.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C and grease and line a 20x20cm square cake tin.
  3. Beat the butter and sugar together until pale and creamy.
  4. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.
  5. Fold in the date mixture.
  6. Sift together the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and spices then fold into the rest of the ingredients.
  7. Pour the batter into the cake tin and bake for 35-40 minutes until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  8. To make the toffee sauce put the butter, golden syrup and muscovado sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a gentle boil, stirring occasionally. Simmer for about 3-4 minutes
  9. Turn the heat right down and pour in the cream and the Baileys. Stir through, then heat through for just a minute to take the sharp edge off the Baileys.
  10. Pour over the warm sticky toffee pudding and serve with the best vanilla ice cream.
Recipe Notes
  • Toffee Sauce adapted from Felicity Cloake’s How to Make the Perfect Sticky Toffee Pudding

Mango Lime Pudding

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

This post is another update of an old post. This was the very last recipe I posted in my last weeks of pregnancy before having Cole and since my life had just turned upside down it was the one featured at the top of my home page for about four months before I felt able to get back to the blog. The old photos hold a particularly gruesome part of my heart as they were the worst ones I think I ever took so I have been keen to revisit this recipe for the past two years and give it the treatment it actually deserved. Below are the original words from back in May 2015 but the photos are resolutely new!

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

This is the easiest pudding in the world and that suits me perfectly. If I can whip this up in 10 minutes at eight and a half months pregnant without needing to have a nap half way through then this is a cinch for anyone.

I have been eating mangos by the crate load lately, I can’t get enough of their rich sweet intensity. However, this current craving has led me to realise how lazy I am with fruit. I’ve always thought that I just wasn’t a big fan unless my apples were baked into a pie or my plums were encased by clafoutis but I have realised that actually fruit by itself is quite nice by itself, only before a meal though, never in lieu of dessert, but this is only the case if someone else prepares it for me.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

I will joyfully make all my pastry from scratch, eschew a bottled pesto for a quick five minutes chucking things in the blender, churn my own ice cream and preserve the season’s offerings in vinegars, chutneys and jams but when it comes to fruit for solitary consumption I have absolutely no patience for preparation. Mangoes may only take a couple of minutes to slice out the stone, hedgehog the flesh before cutting it out into neat cubes but it’s a job I will always give to Luke if he’s anywhere in the vicinity. The same goes for melon, it’s the seeds I just can’t be doing with. To my shame I have thrown out untouched melons bought with the best of intentions that have been abandoned for weeks through sheer laziness.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

My aversion to peeling, de-seeding and chopping has culminated in my recent habit of buying pre-prepared fruit from the supermarket to snack on. It’s something I’m desperately ashamed of since it’s abominably expensive, lazy beyond belief and probably contains an array of preservatives that I don’t want to know about.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

The good thing to know then that the cutting up of the mango for this dessert is the most taxing it gets. So you just have to get past that first initial step and as long as you have a blender your trusty friend will do the rest of the work for you. Which is good when all you feel up to doing lately is having a good nap.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
Print Recipe
Mango Lime Pudding
An ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 3 mangos
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 150 g condensed milk
  • 250 ml extra thick double cream
  • 5 gelatin leaves
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 3 mangos
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 150 g condensed milk
  • 250 ml extra thick double cream
  • 5 gelatin leaves
Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
Instructions
  1. First soak the gelatin by placing in a small bowl and just covering with cold water.
  2. Whilst the gelatin is soaking peel and de-stone the mango. You should have about 500g of mango flesh.
  3. Cube the mango and place in a blender with the lime juice, condensed milk and double cream. Blend until smooth.
  4. Set aside whilst you heat up the gelatin by squeezing it to remove the excess water and placing the leaves in a small saucepan. Heat on low until the gelatin has completed melted and then stir quickly and evenly into the mango pudding.
  5. Divide the pudding into six glasses then place in the fridge to set for at least a couple of hours or overnight.
  6. Serve the mango puddings with a dollop of extra thick double cream on top and a grating of lime zest.