Butter Mint Ice Cream

Butter Mint Ice Cream is the summer incarnation of buttery Murray Mints. Sweet, creamy and caramelly and infused with fresh mint.

Butter Mint Ice Cream

My husband is obsessed with car sweets, the kind that come in a metal tin drowned in icing sugar which you can buy from petrol stations.  We always seem to have a smorgasbord of different flavours spilling out of the glove compartment every time you go to retrieve the sat nav.  They are not so bad when they have just been bought, the sweets bounce around happily in the icing sugar, cheerily rattling against the metal.  However, if the sweets have had the misfortune to have endured a sweltering summer stuck in their hot tin, which they inevitably always do, then the icing sugar melts into a glue, clamping the sweets into a concrete ball.  If you are brave enough to tackle them at this stage you will have to prise one from the sickly grasp of its brethren, resulting in sticky fingers and sticky car.

These sweets are not worth the effort in my opinion and if you even succeed in wrestling one from the tin then they are usually so sweet anyway they make your mouth burn.  But I am not one for sweets, it’s sugar for sugar’s sake and I can get much more enjoyment from a biscuit.

Or, mints and toffees, which can hardly be classed as sweets can they?  Mints are refreshing and toffees are too delicious to pigeon hole.  So for obvious reasons when my husband is thoughtfully choosing his travel sweets I help him out by bunging a packet of  Murray Mints down on the counter, the best of both worlds.  They are much more sensible, much more yummy and they are in a packet and not a tin so you don’t get the painful clanging of the sweets bashing around each other as you fly over pot holes.  The only issue is that they are individually wrapped, great for the melting issue but not so great in making the car not look like a dustbin, as wrappers are discarded willy nilly with empty promises that they will be gathered up and thrown away at a later date.

Butter Mint Ice Cream

Fresh mint ice cream is a biggie in our house and I always take pleasure once a year of making it with the apple mint which we grow in our garden.  For some reason I can usually only make the crop of mint grow once so as soon as I’ve picked it, the herb withers away, only to rally round the next summer in time for my ice cream again.  Apple mint has a slightly furry leaf so you can tell it apart from regular garden mint but you can use either, or a mixture as I sometimes do if I don’t have enough apple mint.  This year I thought I would spruce up my mint ice cream and having had such success with David Lebovitz’s Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream in the past, I couldn’t resist adapting the recipe conjure up the perfect butteriness of a Murray Mint.

The mint nestled into this recipe perfectly, it’s at once refreshing but also comforting and incredibly moreish.  The butter caramel enriches the mint and smoothes out the zingy edges.  It’s also a very reliable recipe, I have made it a few times and it hasn’t once succumbed to icy crystals in the freezer.  It is a softer set ice cream so you don’t have to wait impatiently for the ice cream to come up to scooping temperature.  If you are suffering in this heatwave, you can dive into the freezer and in seconds be sticking a teaspoon straight into the tub with indulgence for the ideal cool down.  If only they could wrap this ice cream up for long summer journeys down the motorway and sell it at petrol stations, then I too would be obsessed with travel sweets.

Butter Mint Ice Cream

Butter Mint Ice Cream

Butter Mint Ice Cream is the summer incarnation of buttery Murray Mints. Sweet, creamy and caramelly and infused with fresh mint.
Prep Time40 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time50 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Servings: 8 servings
Calories: 439

Ingredients

  • 75 g fresh mint leaves including stalks
  • 350 ml double cream
  • 600 ml whole milk
  • 300 g sugar
  • 60 g salted butter
  • 5 egg yolks
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  • Infuse the fresh mint by pouring the milk and cream into two separate saucepans. Split the mint between the two and heat both until just below boiling point. Leave to cool for a couple of hours, then strain and discard the mint leaves from both saucepans. Measure out 250ml of double cream and 500ml whole milk as those are the quantities you will be working with. If there is any leftover you can save for another use or discard.
  • Fill your kitchen sink halfway up with water and pour in a lot of ice until freezing. Place a large mixing bowl into the water, so it comes halfway up the sides then pour half of the minted milk into the mixing bowl. Set a sieve over the top.
  • Spread the sugar in a large saucepan in an even layer. Heat it up until the edges begin to melt, fold it into the centre of the sugar carefully, stirring until it’s all dissolved. Carry on cooking until the caramel begins to smoke then remove from the heat immediately.
  • Add the butter and a pinch of salt until the butter has melted then stir in the cream. Don’t worry if the caramel seizes as it can melt again at the next stage.
  • Place back on the heat and stir until all the caramel has melted. Then stir in the second half of the milk gradually.
  • Whisk the yolks in a bowl, then whisk in some of the warm caramel so the eggs warm up, pour the eggs back into the caramel custard and heat. Stirring all the time until it begins to thicken.
  • Pour into the sieve set above the rest of the minted milk in the ice bath, add the vanilla extract and then whisk constantly until the temperature has cooled.
  • Pour the custard into a large jug, cover with cling film and place in the fridge overnight to chill.
  • The next day churn in your ice cream machine until the consistency of a thick milkshake. Decant into tubs and place in the freezer overnight before serving.

Notes

Adapted from David Lebovitz’s Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream
Yield 2 pints

Nutrition

Calories: 439kcal | Carbohydrates: 44g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 16g | Cholesterol: 206mg | Sodium: 111mg | Potassium: 197mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 41g | Vitamin A: 1515IU | Vitamin C: 3.2mg | Calcium: 152mg | Iron: 0.8mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

Many years ago Luke tried to persuade me than I didn’t need yet another space hogging kitchen gadget that I didn’t use so I bought my ice cream maker on the sly. I honestly haven’t looked back and I am always thrilled to reach down for it and put it to use. I chose the Magimix Le Glacier 1.1 Ltr Ice Cream Maker (White) on a whim but it’s been absolutely brilliant and was very reasonable so I heartily recommend it.

The links above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use either of these links to buy your ice cream maker then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. It’s just a way for me to fund my shopping list for the blog so if you do click through then many thanks!! To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices are a dream come true. Gluten-free cornflake ice cream wrapped in milk chocolate and sprinkled with the salty honeyed crunch of peanuts.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices
These ice creams have been a bit of a passion project of mine for a few weeks. Back when I was doing the Whole30 I was writing this recipe and counting down the days until I could commit to it. Then I finished my Whole30 and kind of got cold feet. It was a recipe which would take a good few days to pull together all the elements and then the last day you have to contend with warm tempered chocolate and cold ice cream without a meltdown.

I am prone to kitchen disasters as I like to constantly swim in unchartered waters. I have an excellent baker friend who is known for the most wonderful cakes. She has a few solid recipes which she brings out in rotation whenever I see her. When she presents her cakes they are reliably beautiful and delicious. Her baking abilities are never questioned; if she has any kitchen failures, she keeps them close to her chest and only brings forth her cakes after they have been thoroughly vetted in her test kitchen and she can wow us all with her brilliance.

I, on the other hand, love to try new recipes pretty much every day, I think I must thrive on the danger of disaster. If an occasion is called to bring a cake then I use it as a perfect excuse to try out the new five layer monstrosity I’ve been working on, complete with untested buttercream, flavours and batter method. It’s always a bit of a gamble as the knife goes through the multi-layered extravaganza in front of a hungry audience as to whether it’s cooked all the way through, whether I have added enough buttercream to the layers and if all the flavours work together. So why do I always live in this constant state of panic? For the pure excitement when it does go right.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices | Stroud Green Larder

Understandably, after days of prepping these choc ices; infusing the milk with cornflakes for a day, then making the ice cream the next day, then churning the ice cream the day after that, before leaving it overnight for setting in the loaf tin, I was very keen on day four that it would not all come to blows on the assembly line. I would be calm, collected, think through my presentation and make sure I have enough lollipop sticks, instead of improvising with cake pop sticks (nope, they are not good enough I have found out in the past).

So I got stage fright. The cornflake ice cream has been waiting patiently in the freezer to be organised into the choc ices for ten days now, fending off after-dinner advances from all members of the household, and generally making me feel like a half job.

Yesterday I bit the bullet and did it. And thank goodness it worked. No tears were shed, no ruined ingredients were thrown in the bin in a childish tantrum and more importantly, I could eat my delicious choc ice that I had invented in the garden after a sweaty day in the kitchen. Pure pleasure. That is what I love about recipe writing, testing and endless research, it’s so satisfying when you get it right. Thanks to the internet I discovered the best way for covering my choc ices in chocolate – filling a good sized jar with the melted chocolate and dipping the ice cream sticks in directly from the freezer. As soon as the chocolate touches the ice cream it forms a barrier against melting and the cold ice cream cools the chocolate immediately, also preventing it from melting the ice cream. Sprinkle those bad boys with the crunchy honey peanuts immediately and then lay to rest on baking parchment and place back into the freezer before they can even think about collapsing. This recipe is a little more fussy than most but it is so worth it.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices | Stroud Green Larder

However, the most important element of this whole recipe is how damn delicious these choc ices are. Cornflake ice cream is a constant presence in our freezer and it is paired deliciously, as I had hoped, with the thick wrapping of milk chocolate and the salty honeyed crunch of peanuts. They are tasty, tasty, very very tasty. They’re very tasty.

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices

Crunchy Nut Cornflake Choc Ices are a dream come true. Gluten-free cornflake ice cream wrapped in milk chocolate and sprinkled with the salty honeyed crunch of peanuts.
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time15 mins
Resting time2 d
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Servings: 10 choc ices
Calories: 767

Ingredients

  • 1.2 lt whole milk
  • 150 g gluten-free cornflakes
  • 600 ml double cream
  • 12 egg yolks
  • 180 g golden caster sugar
  • 250 g natural unsalted peanuts
  • 75 g honey
  • 25 g light brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 300 g milk chocolate
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil

Instructions

  • Tip the cornflakes into a large bowl and pour over the milk. Cover with cling film and leave to soak in the fridge overnight.
  • Strain the milk and discard the soggy cornflakes. You should have achieved about 600ml of cornflake infused milk.
  • Pour the milk and the cream into a large saucepan and bring to an even boil.
  • Meanwhile whisk together the egg yolks and caster sugar in a large mixing bowl until they are pale, thick and frothy.
  • Once the milk and cream have boiled, turn off the heat and very carefully pour into the egg yolks and sugar in a very thin stream whisking it in all the while.
  • Pour it all into a bain marie set over a pan of simmering water. Bring the cornflake custard up to 70°C, whisking all the while to avoid lumps and curdling.
  • Remove the bain marie from the heat and plunge the bowl into a sink full of iced water to immediately drop the temperature. Stir the custard until the temperature begins to cool. Remove from the ice bath, cover the surface of the custard with clingfilm to ward off any skin forming then leave to chill in the fridge overnight.
  • Once the custard is thoroughly chilled then churn in an ice cream machine until it forms a thick dropping consistency.
  • Pour the soft set ice cream into a 9 inch loaf tin, cover tightly with cling film and place in the freezer to set overnight.
  • To make the crunchy honey nuts first spread the peanuts on a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10 minutes at 180°C.
  • Remove the peanuts from the oven and chop roughly.
  • Meanwhile boil the honey and sugar with a pinch of salt in a medium saucepan until it reaches a rolling boil, turn down slightly and cook for about 2 minutes until the honey caramel darkens slightly.
  • Turn off the heat then tip the peanuts into the saucepan. Mix quickly until the peanuts are evenly coated then pour onto baking parchment and leave to harden for 30 minutes. Once hardened, chop roughly.
  • Remove the ice cream from the freezer and turn it out of the loaf tin. If this is proving difficult, either run a blow torch around the outside of the tin or carefully run the bottom of the tin under hot water.
  • Once the ice cream has been removed cut into slices, neatening the edges evenly. Quickly insert the lollipop sticks into the base of the ice cream slices and place on baking parchment lined baking trays then return to the freezer until needed.
  • Melt the chocolate with the coconut oil in a bain marie or a metal bowl set over simmering water, then once melted pour into a glass.
  • Remove your ice cream from the freezer and dip in and out of the melted chocolate quickly. Place back onto the parchment lined baking tray and sprinkle with the crunchy honey nuts.
  • Place the ice creams back into the freezer to set for about 10 minutes before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 767kcal | Carbohydrates: 64g | Protein: 14g | Fat: 55g | Saturated Fat: 27g | Cholesterol: 317mg | Sodium: 187mg | Potassium: 372mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 42g | Vitamin A: 1240IU | Vitamin C: 0.3mg | Calcium: 103mg | Iron: 2.6mg

Bitter Chocolate and Orange Ricotta Ice Cream

Bitter Chocolate and Orange Ricotta Ice Cream is a light and zesty orange ice cream, tangy with ricotta and studded with dark chocolate shards.


I find ice cream one of the most relaxing and joyful things to make.  One of the key notes about Diane Keaton’s character in It’s Complicated- oh we quote the highbrow art here – is that if she can’t sleep she makes ice cream.  Typically for a Diane Keaton role she is uptight and neurotic so her freezer is bursting with ice cream.  However, that comforting and gentle experience of making ice cream is something I can completely relate to.

When I stopped working full time last year I went on a bit of an ice cream bender.  I made all the flavours I had been setting aside for the many years I had worked in an intense and long-houred career.  I was now free to produce tubs of salted butter ice cream, apple pie ice cream, cornflake ice cream, and malted milk ice cream.  I bought gallons of double cream and whole milk, experimented, I infused and I churned like a milk maid gone wild.  There were no losers in this scenario.  It took my mind off the terrifying prospect that I had just voluntarily given up the career I had proudly worked all my adult life to achieve and it helped me reflect on exactly what I planned to do next.   Plus my husband loves ice cream so he was as happy as a pig in Mississippi mud pie ice cream.  Which was also delicious.

It’s surprising then that I haven’t talked much about ice cream in the few months I have been writing here.  I suppose I took a bit of a hiatus, after all our freezer isn’t the giant American style megalith that Diane Keaton had and it could only take so much.  The good news is that my ice cream supply is now dwindling and I have been slowly picking up the pace these past couple of weeks to build it back up again.  Unfortunately it has coincided with the time of year that the freezer needs defrosting, but that just means we’ll have to eat it as quickly as I make it.  Again, there are no losers in this scenario.

Bitter Chocolate and Orange Ricotta Ice Cream

A light and zesty orange ice cream, tangy with ricotta and studded with dark chocolate shards.
Prep Time40 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Resting time13 hrs
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Servings: 6 people
Calories: 400

Ingredients

  • 250 ml double cream
  • 100 ml whole milk
  • 1 orange zest only
  • 240 g ricotta
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 90 g caster sugar
  • 50 g dark chocolate

Instructions

  • Mix together the double cream, milk and orange zest in a medium saucepan and warm through. Set aside for 1 hour to infuse.
  • Mix the ricotta in with the cream mixture and heat in a medium saucepan until just under a boil.
  • In a large bowl whisk together the egg yolks and caster sugar until smooth.
  • Pour the ricotta mixture into the egg mixture in very slow and steady stream whisking constantly.
  • When everything is combined pour back into the saucepan and heat until just under a boil and the mixture has thickened.
  • Strain to remove the zest, then chill for at least 4 hours.
  • Churn in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes until thickened. Sprinkle in the chocolate chips and continue churning for a minute to evenly disperse.
  • Decant into ice cream tubs and freeze for at least 8 hours before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 400kcal | Carbohydrates: 25g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 30g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Cholesterol: 275mg | Sodium: 67mg | Potassium: 214mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 20g | Vitamin A: 1125IU | Vitamin C: 11.9mg | Calcium: 167mg | Iron: 1.6mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

Many years ago Luke tried to persuade me than I didn’t need yet another space hogging kitchen gadget that I didn’t use so I bought my ice cream maker on the sly. I honestly haven’t looked back and I am always thrilled to reach down for it and put it to use. I chose the Magimix Le Glacier 1.1 Ltr Ice Cream Maker (White) on a whim but it’s been absolutely brilliant and was very reasonable so I heartily recommend it.

This post is not sponsored but some of the links within the post are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.