Homemade Crystallised Ginger

Homemade Crystallised Stem Ginger (or Candied Ginger) is a spicy treat. Excellent as a little nibble with some coffee, an adornment to baked goods or given away as a beautiful sparkly gift.

close up shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger

Did you have a go at Homemade Stem Ginger in syrup already? If you have then you’ll be streaks ahead in this recipe as Homemade Crystallised Stem Ginger is pretty much the same method but with a couple of extra steps.

But first things first.

What is the difference between Stem Ginger and Crystallised Ginger?

In UK supermarkets the most commonly found ginger products in the baking aisles are Stem Ginger and Crystallised Ginger. The ingredient known as Stem Ginger is balls of ginger preserved in a gingery syrup which I tackled in my previous recipe for Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup. Crystallised Ginger is the same preserved ginger but it is dried and rolled instead in a coating of sugar.

Since Stem Ginger is kept in its syrup it’s a much softer ingredient and excellent baked into cakes, cookies or in savoury dishes where it adds a hot sweetness You can use Crystallised Ginger in exactly the same way but it has a firmer grittier texture and probably not recommended for savoury dishes due to its sugar coating. Crystallised Ginger is also the better candidate for the decoration of baked goods and really comes into its own as a standalone treat with a cup of tea.

overhead shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger

Crystallised Ginger really is quite easy to make. You should follow all the simple steps to make the Stem Ginger in Syrup which includes an initial simmer in water to tenderise the ginger followed by a couple of hours cooking in sugar syrup. However, whereas at this point you would decant the ginger with its syrup into jars for the previous recipe, here you remove the ginger from the syrup, dry it on a wire rack then roll in sugar.

Ways to use leftover ginger syrup

With this recipe you will be left with the most deliciously fiery ginger syrup which will really come into its own in your kitchen. Keep it in a jar in the fridge alongside your ginger for a dozen uses:

  • Topped up with prosecco for Gingerbread Bellinis
  • Used instead of honey in your marinades
  • Drizzled over ice cream, cakes, porridge
  • In salad dressings
  • Poured into coffee for the best Gingerbread Lattes
  • Or as the basis for this amazing 4 ingredient Salted Ginger Fudge

Crystallised Ginger makes a stunning homemade gift, all golden and sparkly in its jar. Alternatively it could be displayed resplendent on a cheeseboard or served with your after dinner coffee.

mid shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger

If you make this Crystallised Ginger recipe then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this lovely ingredient as the VIP in your own baking or cooking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Homemade Crystallised Ginger
Homemade Crystallised Stem Ginger (or Candied Ginger) is a spicy treat. Excellent as a little nibble with some coffee, an adornment to baked goods or given away as a beautiful sparkly gift.
mid shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger
Course preserve
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Passive Time 2 days
Servings
1x 500g jar
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar + 100g extra sugar to roll
  • 600 ml water
Course preserve
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Passive Time 2 days
Servings
1x 500g jar
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar + 100g extra sugar to roll
  • 600 ml water
mid shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger
Instructions
Day 1
  1. Freeze ginger overnight to tenderise.
Day 2
  1. Remove the ginger from the freezer and wait for about 5-10 minutes for the ginger to warm slightly then peel and slice into pieces. There should be about 450g ginger after peeling and chopping
  2. Cook the ginger in a large saucepan with the lid on for 2½ hours in 1.4 litres water until the ginger is tender.
  3. Drain the ginger but reserve water.
  4. Then weigh the water, you will need about 600ml so add more water if it’s slightly less or pour some away if it’s more.
  5. Pour the water back into the saucepan and add the granulated sugar.
  6. Bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  7. Add the ginger back in and bring back to a boil then simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Remove from the heat and leave to cool. Then cover the saucepan and leave overnight.
Day 3
  1. Place the pan back on the heat. Bring the ginger in syrup back to the boil and turn down to simmer with the lid on for 1-2 hours until the syrup is thick and the ginger is translucent and very tender.
  2. Remove the ginger with a fork onto a wire rack to cool and dry overnight.
  3. Roll the dry ginger in sugar and store in a sterilised glass jar.*
Recipe Notes

*I store my Crystallised Ginger in the fridge where it lasts for about 3 months.

But what do you do with all that leftover ginger syrup? Try this 4 ingredient Salted Ginger Fudge. You don’t have to make this fudge the same day that you made the Crystallised Ginger. Take a break, wait a day or so. Your syrup will sit happily covered at room temperature whilst you find more time.

If you are wondering what to do with all the leftover syrup once you have finished your Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup then why not try this easy Salted Ginger Fudge recipe. It only has four ingredients and is absolutely delicious. You can download the recipe at the link below.

A plate of salted ginger fudge next to a piece of ginger

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

An open jar of Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

Homemade Mixed Peel

Homemade Mixed Peel
Homemade Glacé Cherries

A cupcake on a cake stand next to some glacé cherries

Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup is sweet, spicy and much brighter than the shop bought stuff. It’s so easy to make and is a wonderful ingredient for all types of recipes.

An open jar of Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

This week I’m giving my posts over to ginger. Fresh ginger is a bit of a special ingredient isn’t it? It can be used in everything from sweet to savoury and is used all over the world from traditional British cooking to traditional Asian cooking. It is spicy and fiery and at the same time feels so good for you. In fact it is so good for you. Ginger helps nausea, relieve muscle soreness, it is also an anti-inflammatory, lowers blood sugars, helps with indigestion, menstruation cramps and can help lower cholesterol. It’s no wonder we love ginger and use it so prolifically.

A plate of stem ginger

One of my favourite ways to incorporate ginger into my baking and cooking is the jars of stem ginger in syrup which you can find in the baking department of the supermarket. It is an ingredient I turn to time and time again as it works in so many different places, adding a subtle ginger kick to recipes such as Green Tomato and Stem Ginger Streusel Cake, Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin, Strawberry and Stem Ginger Sangria or Apple and Stem Ginger Chutney.

Chopped stem ginger

My use of stem ginger doesn’t just stop at the little balls of ginger either, I love to use the syrup in recipes. The sweet syrup infused with plenty of ginger kick can be used to liven up cocktails, be poured over ice cream or to sweeten up fruit salads.

In fact I use stem ginger in syrup so much that I wondered if there was a way I could take my love of it to the next level. Of course there was. I could make my own.

A jar of Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

Now my investigation into how to make Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup led me to the very interesting realisation that not only is it super quick and easy to make your own with so much more flavour intensity but the recipe is only a few steps away to making Crystallised Stem Ginger. If you like Stem Ginger in Syrup then you know you’re going to love Crystallised Stem Ginger, a beautiful sweet treat that’s delicious on its own or as cake decoration or as an accompaniment to a plain sponge or ice cream. So I couldn’t help myself. I am sharing both of these recipes.

Today I’m giving you the lowdown on how to make your own Stem Ginger in Syrup, followed by my next post on how to take that recipe one step further to create Crystallised Stem Ginger. If you’re still with me after that then you can choose to be treated to a very special recipe on how to use all your leftover syrup. We’re going to make the most delicious Salted Ginger Fudge

A jar of Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

All of these recipes are great for your own personal use but they are also ideal if you are looking for a special homemade gift this season. The Stem Ginger in syrup is oh so useful and a lovely pressie for the home baker. The Crystallised Ginger will be appreciated by everyone, it is such a treat and so beautiful in a jar. There will be some very happy people on Christmas morning.

So let’s not dilly dally any more, let me light the way towards the recipe for Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup.

Jars of Homemade Stem Ginger in syrup

If you make this Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup recipe then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this lovely ingredient as the VIP in your own baking or cooking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup is sweet, spicy and much brighter than the shop bought stuff. It's so easy to make and is a wonderful ingredient for all types of recipes.
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Servings
2 380g jars
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar
  • 600 ml water
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Servings
2 380g jars
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar
  • 600 ml water
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup
Instructions
Day 1
  1. Freeze ginger overnight to tenderise.
Day 2
  1. Remove the ginger from the freezer and wait for about 5-10 minutes for the ginger to warm slightly then peel and slice into pieces. There should be about 450g ginger after peeling and chopping
  2. Cook the ginger in a large saucepan with the lid on for 2½ hours in 1.4 litres water until the ginger is tender.
  3. Drain the ginger but reserve water.
  4. Then weigh the water, you will need about 600ml so add more water if it’s slightly less or pour some away if it’s more.
  5. Pour the water back into the saucepan and add the granulated sugar.
  6. Bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  7. Add the ginger back in and bring back to a boil then simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Turn off the heat and behold your stem ginger in syrup.
  9. To store your ginger, scoop out the ginger and pack into sterilised jars*, topping the jars up with the syrup to completely cover the ginger.
Recipe Notes

*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.

Do you want to go a step further for Homemade [recipe]Crystallised Ginger? Then stay tuned for my next post…

If you are wondering what to do with all the leftover syrup once you have finished your Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup then why not try this easy Salted Ginger Fudge recipe. It only has four ingredients and is absolutely delicious. You can download the recipe at the link below.

A plate of salted ginger fudge next to a piece of ginger

SHOP THE RECIPE

I absolutely love this Kuhn Rikon Piranha Y Peeler, Green and it’s excellent at peeling the fresh ginger for this recipe. It’s specifically designed for peeling smooth/fuzzy skins such as tomatoes, peppers, peaches, kiwi fruits but I use it for so much more. It has razor-sharp serrated stainless steel blade and grips securely so won’t slip and produces paper-thin strips so you don’t lose any of your precious ginger.

I find my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue absolutely indispensable when I’m making any type of preserve or indeed anything in the kitchen. It’s very heavy duty but I use it for absolutely everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Homemade Mixed Peel

Homemade Mixed Peel
Homemade Glacé Cherries

A cupcake on a cake stand next to some glacé cherries
Green Tomato and Stem Ginger Streusel Cake

overhead shot of Green Tomato and Stem Ginger Cake with Streusel Topping {gluten-free} on a plate with green tomatoes next to it

Gingerbread Ice Cream

Gingerbread Ice Cream is a warmly spiced ice cream, intense with dark sugar and black treacle and thickened with double cream for rich creaminess.

Gingerbread Ice Cream

This Gingerbread Ice Cream has been sorting out all of my Christmassy food needs. Just like my previous pregnancy I have been craving ice cream all the time. When specific food cravings hit I am so happy I live in London where I can access the best ice cream parlours. My favourite is definitely Udderlicious on Upper Street in Islington. They have so many delicious flavours which are impossible to choose from and are open until 11pm so if Luke and I are ever organised enough to book a babysitter and have dinner out then we usually go somewhere in Islington and nip over to Udderlicious for ice cream afterwards.

Gingerbread Ice Cream

I don’t actually have to travel as far as Udderlicious though in most cases as our local ice cream café in Crouch End, Rileys, offers some pretty amazing gelato with different flavours every time we go. Which is a lot. Cole is an ice cream ninja too and I treat us almost every Wednesday afternoon to a trip to Rileys. It’s incredibly cute as he’s convinced the girl who works there is Elsa from Frozen. It’s true that she is very pretty with ice blonde hair which she usually wears in in a plait over her shoulder so he isn’t too far off. When we watch Frozen and I ask Cole where Elsa works he happily replies that she works in the ice cream shop making tea. Sounds about right.

Cole invariably chooses mango sorbet at Rileys or if they don’t have that then chocolate ice cream is a pretty decent second choice. I usually go with my cravings so it could be anything from a fruity sorbet to stracciatella to peanut butter. A couple of weeks ago though they had the most divine ginger and black treacle ice cream which epitomised my most favourite Christmas flavours. Darkly spiced but rich and creamy. So my inspiration here has derived from that amazing ice cream.

Gingerbread Ice Cream

Looking back over the past month or so it becomes apparent that ginger has also become a bit of a thing for me as well. See Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin and Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle. There is something about the fiery heat of fresh ginger, intensified by the even temper of the ground ginger that means you can happily eat ice cream even on the snowiest and coldest of days. The dark muscovado sugar and black treacle have an almost warming effect despite arriving at your bowl direct from the freezer.

These flavours pair beautifully with this incredibly versatile ice cream base which is made from a custard. Here I infused the custard with ginger and spice, but the whole base is made even richer and creamier by whipping up some double cream to fold in thickly before churning.

Gingerbread Ice Cream

Gingerbread Ice Cream is perfect for offering as a Christmas dessert. I’d even go so far as to say that you’d be very wise to offer it alongside the Christmas Pudding for the ultimate indulgence. I’m not sorry to admit that I heated up one of my mince pies made with Victorian Mincemeat a few nights ago and scooped a load of Gingerbread Ice Cream onto the top. It was simply divine. A real Christmas treat.

Gingerbread Ice Cream is also very forgiving as like most of my favourite ice cream recipes it doesn’t set too firm or have the tendency to turn into ice crystals if you don’t cool it fast enough. Even the laziest ice cream maker (yes, that’s me) can get this perfect first time.

Gingerbread Ice Cream

Print Recipe
Gingerbread Ice Cream
Gingerbread Ice Cream is a warmly spiced ice cream, intense with dark sugar and treacle and thickened with double cream for rich creaminess.
Gingerbread Ice Cream
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 300 ml single cream
  • 8 g peeled fresh ginger grated
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon cornflour
  • 100 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon black treacle
  • 300 g double cream
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 300 ml single cream
  • 8 g peeled fresh ginger grated
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon cornflour
  • 100 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon black treacle
  • 300 g double cream
Gingerbread Ice Cream
Instructions
  1. Pour the single cream into a saucepan and whisk in the fresh ginger, ground ginger, cinnamon and cloves.
  2. Turn the heat on and bring to just below a boil.
  3. Turn off the heat and leave for a couple of hours to infuse then sieve the cream.
  4. Next you’ll make a custard by beating the egg yolks, cornflour, sugar and treacle until smooth then heat the single cream again until just under a boil.
  5. Pour the hot cream into the egg mixture, whisking continuously until all the cream has been added and the mixture has totally combined.
  6. Pour the custard back into the saucepan and heat gently, whisk until thickened but not so the custard is boiling.
  7. Remove from the heat, pour the custard into a bowl then cover and put in the fridge overnight to completely chill.
  8. The following day whip the double cream until it reaches soft peaks then fold gently into the gingerbread custard until everything has completely combined.
  9. Pour this extra thick custard into an ice cream machine and churn per the machine’s instructions*.
  10. You can eat the ice cream straight away from the ice cream machine but it’s very soft serve or you can pour into a container and place in the freezer until needed where it will solidify to a firmer ice cream texture.
Recipe Notes

*If you are using the Magimix Le Glacier or a machine similar then I have found that churning the mixture for about 20 minutes is plenty.

SHOP THE RECIPE

Many years ago Luke tried to persuade me than I didn’t need yet another space hogging kitchen gadget that I didn’t use so I bought my ice cream maker on the sly. I honestly haven’t looked back and I am always thrilled to reach down for it and put it to use. I chose the Magimix Le Glacier 1.1 Ltr Ice Cream Maker (White) on a whim but it’s been absolutely brilliant and was very reasonable so I heartily recommend it.

The links above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use either of these links to buy your ice cream maker then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. It’s just a way for me to fund my shopping list for the blog so if you do click through then many thanks!!

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle is a fiery offering to your afternoon tea. Punchy with stem ginger, fresh ginger and ground ginger and infused with a spicy Scotch whisky this is a lovely warming cake.

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}

We haven’t really had proper snow in London for a few years now so had yet to experience a proper snow day together as a family. This morning we had our usual morning wake up call of 5am from Cole who is really throwing himself into the Christmas spirit and joined us in bed with his manic renditions of Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer and Jingle Bells. After a brief glance out of the bedroom window to catch a glimpse of the snow predicted I was disappointed to see a dark morning with only sheets of rain illuminated by the streetlamps. So we went back to bed, trying to convince Cole that it was still sleepytime. He agreed that he was very tired but continued to enthral us with his Christmas playlist for the next forty minutes.

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}

During tea and toast in the kitchen the first snowflake started to fall and by the time we had pulled on boots, jumpers, hats and gloves the snow was thickly carpeting the urban landscape. Cole couldn’t get outside fast enough and immediately started rolling up snowballs to throw around the garden and decreed that snow was in fact his new snack of choice. The speed with which the snow arrived and settled was unbelievable. Just an hour before our street was a normal dank London morning, suddenly it looked like a scene from Frozen.

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}

Unfortunately our frolics in the snow didn’t last long as I had a market to do. My in-laws were now stuck up in Ely with the snow so we didn’t have a Cole-sitter. Trying to set up a cake stall and warding off a choco-crazy toddler from said cakes is a very special challenge I urge all parents to enjoy. At least the market was moved inside the school so set up was quick and then Luke whisked Cole away for snow angel antics in the playground.

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}

By the time I had finished at the market, the snow had turned to that slimy grey sludge which makes you remember why snow isn’t actually as cool as it promises as you slip and curse trying to carry glass cake stands, wooden signage and tables back to the car.

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}

Thank goodness then that we could come back to the house, light the fire and enjoy a slice of this Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle that I had saved for us to share. This cake could not be coming to you at a better time. The three types of ginger used spark a sweet warmth, perfect for cold snowy days, not to mention the soul soothing blanket of scotch whisky nestled within. This cake is one of Luke’s top three of all the cakes on my cake stall. It is ultra moist and the zingy lime icing freshens up the cake and gives the dark depths of the sponge a lovely contrast.

Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}

I do love a good snow day and it was thrilling to be able to enjoy this one with Cole, may every wintry December day be punctuated at the end with this delightfully warming cake.

Snow Day

Print Recipe
Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}
Gluten-Free Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle is a fiery offering with three types of ginger and infused with a spicy Scotch whisky.
Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
12 people
Ingredients
  • 100 g sweet rice flour
  • 100 g teff flour
  • 75 g oat flour
  • 25 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • teaspoons ground mixed spice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 150 g unsalted butter
  • 150 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 150 g black treacle
  • 150 g golden syrup
  • 300 ml whole milk
  • 35 ml scotch whisky
  • 80 g stem ginger chopped finely 4 balls
  • 1 inch piece fresh ginger peeled and finely grated
  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
Lime Drizzle
  • 150 g icing sugar
  • 2 limes zested
  • juice of 1-2 limes
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
12 people
Ingredients
  • 100 g sweet rice flour
  • 100 g teff flour
  • 75 g oat flour
  • 25 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • teaspoons ground mixed spice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 150 g unsalted butter
  • 150 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 150 g black treacle
  • 150 g golden syrup
  • 300 ml whole milk
  • 35 ml scotch whisky
  • 80 g stem ginger chopped finely 4 balls
  • 1 inch piece fresh ginger peeled and finely grated
  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
Lime Drizzle
  • 150 g icing sugar
  • 2 limes zested
  • juice of 1-2 limes
Sticky Ginger and Whisky Cake with Lime Drizzle {gluten-free}
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 160°C and line and grease a deep 8 inch round cake tin.
  2. Sift together the flours, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder and spices in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add the butter and rub into the flour mixture until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  4. Put the sugar, treacle, syrup and milk into a medium saucepan and heat, gently stirring until the sugar has dissolved but turn off the heat when the mixture reaches just below boiling point.
  5. Add stem ginger and fresh ginger to flour mixture and whisk in until evenly dispersed, then pour in the treacle mix, then the whisky and combine. Finally beat in the eggs.
  6. Pour into the cake tin and bake for 45-50 minutes.
Lime Drizzle
  1. Make the icing by beating together the zest and enough lime juice with the icing sugar until the icing is just pourable.

Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin {gluten-free, vegan}

Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin is the most moreish treat in your cake tin, sticky, chewy and laced with spices. Plus this version is also gluten-free, vegan and naturally pretty darn yummy.

side view of Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin on a wire rack

Parkin is a traditional recipe from Northern England eaten on Bonfire Night which is when this recipe was supposed to be posted but life has been getting away with me a little bit, hence the delay. Really though, parkin is pretty delicious all year round, why limit yourself to the 5th November.

If you are a traditional Yorkshire lad or lass then look away now as you’ll probably shudder in terror that not only have I removed all the butter from your parkin but I have also drizzled it in a tangy blanket of lemon icing. I promise though, once you forgive my blatant flagrancy of the word ‘parkin’ you will learn to love these little changes. These Lemon Iced Sticky Stem Ginger Parkins are lighter than their namesake thanks to the coconut oil and almond milk used in the bake and the zesty lemon gives a lovely textural and tasty balance. Don’t worry though, I haven’t messed around with the thick oozy golden syrup which is what gives parkin its personality.

Overhead shot of Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin on a wire rack with a knife

I have been making a variation of this parkin for years and originally started making it from a Sarah Randell recipe ripped out of Sainsbury’s Magazine, I think. It’s always been my go-to bake for WI and school cake sales as it’s difficult to find anyone who can resist the charms of parkin. It’s a bit like gingerbread but stuffed with a lot of oats so is a little chewier. The golden syrup or treacle used in the recipe make the treat gloriously sticky. So it’s chewy, sticky, packed with spice and definitely homely. I’ve recently started including the Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin on my own cake stall and customers have been loving it. It’s Mum’s favourite and if she is staying the weekend to help out with Cole then it’s a given that she’ll expect me to tuck a little piece away for her train journey home.

Overhead shot of Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin on a wire rack

Parkin is also great as it seems to last and last, as my Mum can attest to the time when she forgot about the parkin in her handbag and only got around to eating it 5 days later. It definitely improves after a couple of days of resting in the cake tin as it gets more sticky. If you don’t want to eat the parkin straightaway then I would recommend leaving it whole and only cutting into pieces when you want some. Although you will find it difficult to restrain yourself.

side view of Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin on a wire rack

Print Recipe
Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin {gluten-free, vegan}
Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin is the most moreish treat in your cake tin, sticky, chewy and laced with spices. This version is also gluten-free and vegan.
side view of Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin on a wire rack
Cuisine British
Keyword cake, gluten-free
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Servings
12 squares
Ingredients
Stem Ginger Parkin
  • 300 g golden caster sugar
  • 125 g sweet rice flour
  • 100 g oat flour
  • 35 g tapioca flour
  • 185 g gluten-free oats
  • teaspoons ground ginger
  • teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 300 ml almond milk
  • 3 tablespoons golden syrup
  • 165 ml coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 3 balls preserved stem ginger finely chopped
Lemon Icing
  • 225 g icing sugar
  • zest and juice of 1 lemon
Cuisine British
Keyword cake, gluten-free
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Servings
12 squares
Ingredients
Stem Ginger Parkin
  • 300 g golden caster sugar
  • 125 g sweet rice flour
  • 100 g oat flour
  • 35 g tapioca flour
  • 185 g gluten-free oats
  • teaspoons ground ginger
  • teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 300 ml almond milk
  • 3 tablespoons golden syrup
  • 165 ml coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 3 balls preserved stem ginger finely chopped
Lemon Icing
  • 225 g icing sugar
  • zest and juice of 1 lemon
side view of Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin on a wire rack
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 150°C and line and grease a 20cm square baking tin.
  2. In a large mixing bowl whisk together the sugar, flours, oats, ginger, bicarbonate of soda and salt and set aside for a minute.
  3. Take a medium sized saucepan and pour in the almond milk, golden syrup, coconut oil and cider vinegar. Turn onto a gentle heat and stir the ingredients together until everything has melted together.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, along with the stem ginger and beat well with a wooden spoon.
  5. Pour the mixture into the baking tin and bake for 40-45 minutes.
  6. Remove from the oven, leave the parkin to settle for ten minutes then carefully turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. Make the icing by beating together the lemon juice and zest with the icing sugar until the icing is pourable.
  8. Pour the icing over the cooled parkin, leave to set and then cut the parkin into 12 squares.
Recipe Notes

* A lot of gluten-free oats are of the rolled or jumbo variety but that doesn’t work as well for this recipe. I have found that Nairn’s gluten-free oats which are a finer oatmeal give the best texture as the oats are able to become a part of the cake without being too granular.

Lemon Poached Chicken with Gingery Rice

Lemon Poached Chicken with Gingery Rice

Since the New Year I have been laid low by a horrible bug.  Sickness is no fun when you enjoy guzzling yourself silly three or more times a day, especially when you are used to food being the comforter and not the antagonist.

lemon chicken with ginger rice3A recipe was called for to nurse myself back to health and there was no other ingredient to turn to than ginger.  Although scientific research is on the fence over the actually proven combative results of ginger, I am a sworn believer that a few matchsticks of fresh ginger can settle the stomach and promote general well being in the face of any adversity, especially poorliness.

The refreshing zing required a soothing background of tender lemon chicken and rice.  The vegetables needed to be cut small so they practically melted into the rice and the patient doesn’t pick out their nutrients.

Poached chicken
The chicken breast poached in stock and a dash of lemon juice adds a light protein to the dish, perfect for rebuilding energy.  I have specified below that using bouillon in this instance is fine but typically I didn’t have any so I poached my chicken with some ends of veg and herbs to impart a bit of flavour.  A stock on the go if you will.

lemon chicken with ginger rice2Lemon Poached Chicken with Gingery Rice

Serves 2

1 chicken breast
Stock for poaching, bouillon is fine to use
Juice of ½ lemon
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs of thyme
1 tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, finely diced
½ courgette, finely diced
1 carrot, finely diced
30g root ginger
½ chilli, seeds removed, finely diced
1 garlic clove, finely diced
300g cooked basmati rice
1 tsp sesame salt

  1. Place the chicken breast with the lemon juice, bay leaf and sprig of thyme in a small saucepan and enough hot stock to cover. Bring to a simmer then put the lid on. The chicken should take about 10 mins depending on the size of the chicken breast.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil with the onions for 5 mins until soft.
  3. Add the courgette and carrot and stir-fry on a medium-high heat.
  4. Peel then grate in almost all the ginger, leaving some to cut into small matchsticks for later.
  5. Add the chilli and garlic and stir for 3-4 mins until the veg is starting to brown.
  6. Add the rice and sesame salt and stir until the rice is piping hot. You might need to add a dash more olive oil if the rice is sticking.
  7. Take off the heat and serve with the poached chicken, lemon slices and the ginger matchsticks.
Puppy and Tiger

Even though puppy and my little tiger make excellent companions sleeping on my sick bed none of them have yet learnt how to whip up a chicken soup.