Raspberry Coconut Jam

This Raspberry Coconut Jam is the best thing that’s going to come out of your kitchen this summer.

Raspberry and Coconut Jam

Of all the jams surely raspberry jam is the most superior? Well it’s certainly the jam that the Women’s Institute deem the only appropriate jam for an approved WI Victoria Sandwich cake so that certainly tells us something. Here I’ve amped up a very easy raspberry jam by marrying it with coconut, a love story for our times and it’s no exaggeration to say that this Raspberry and Coconut Jam is taking over my life at the moment.

Last month we travelled up to Scotland for a wedding and made a mini-holiday of it. It’s a bit on an effort to go anywhere with a baby so we got quite cosy in Fife, staying at the gorgeous Cairnie Fruit Farm which not only has a maize maze (!!!) but they also bottle their own jam with fruit freshly plucked from the vine. On our arrival they left us a delicious pot of their raspberry jam with fresh scones. It was like I suddenly discovered raspberry jam again, I had forgotten just how utterly vibrant and exciting this most superior of jams is.

Raspberry and Coconut Jam

The secret to an easy raspberry jam is to use equal parts fruit and jam sugar. To be honest once you have that little bit of info in your back pocket you can pretty much make any jam. Raspberries don’t have much natural pectin, the special stuff present in most fruit which helps a jam achieve its setting point. You could pair the raspberries with another fruit like apples which are high in pectin, also a good method of making your raspberry jam go further, but if you are after a clean raspberry taste then jam sugar is your best friend as it has pectin built in. I also included the juice of a lemon not only for more pectin to ensure an easy set but also to encourage the piquancy of our raspberry flavour.

Raspberry and Coconut Jam

Now this wouldn’t be much of a love story without a leading man and for that part I have cast the superstar coconut. He is everything a raspberry could wish for, this jam is truly a romance for the ages. The two flavours are just meant to be together and that’s that.

My favourite way to incorporate a certain flavour into anything is to include two different dimensions of the same ingredient, so here I don’t just use coconut cream or desiccated coconut but a combination of both. The desiccated coconut is steeped in the heated coconut cream to soften it up and then this coconut flavourbomb is added at the beginning of the jam process. It couldn’t be easier.

If you don’t like coconut then you can simply use the method outlined below for the raspberry jam and omit the coconut but why would you??? It’s true love!

Raspberry and Coconut Jam

This jam is most excellent as the cake filling of a Victoria Sandwich (just don’t tell the WI there’s coconut in it) so to celebrate this epic Raspberry Coconut Jam I’ll be posting my best recipe for the best Victoria Sandwich in an upcoming post (hint: raspberry and coconut jam might be involved).

Print Recipe
Raspberry Coconut Jam
A classic raspberry jam, made all the better with lashings of coconut.
Raspberry and Coconut Jam
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 2 hours
Servings
6x 200ml jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg raspberries
  • 1 kg jam sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 200 ml coconut cream
  • 50 g desiccated coconut
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 2 hours
Servings
6x 200ml jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg raspberries
  • 1 kg jam sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 200 ml coconut cream
  • 50 g desiccated coconut
Raspberry and Coconut Jam
Instructions
  1. Place your raspberries, jam sugar and lemon juice in a large bowl and stir well. Leave to macerate together for at least a couple of hours.
  2. Pour the coconut cream into a saucepan and stir in the desiccated coconut. Bring to the boil then turn off the heat and let stand for a couple of hours.
  3. Stir the raspberries, sugar, lemon juice and coconut mixture together in a large preserving pan then bring to a rolling boil.
  4. Boil the mixture hard for about 5 minutes or until the jam has reached setting point (about 104.5°C).
  5. Decant the jam into sterilised jars and leave to cool. The jam can be stored in a cool dark place for about 12 months.
Recipe Notes
  • If you can’t find coconut cream you can extract the cream from a tin of coconut milk. Place a 400g tin of coconut milk in the fridge for a day or so, whereupon the coconut cream will harden and separate itself from the coconut water. When you open the tin you should be able to just scoop out the cream leaving the water behind. There should be about 200g of cream in a 400g tin.
  • I often do steps 1 and 2 last thing in the evening and place both the macerating raspberries and the steeping coconut in the fridge (in separate containers) and then begin my jam first thing the next day.

Pineapple, White Chocolate and Coconut Cookies

Pineapple White Chocolate and Coconut Cookies

This recipe is not yet gluten-free

If there is one plaintive cry that is often heard in this house, it’s ‘Why do you never make cookies?’

It’s true that cookies are usually superseded by a sudden whim to make a cake or a brownie so they usually fall down the pecking order. Plus cookies are remarkably easy to eat aren’t they? What is it about them that makes you believe it’s okay to have two or three when you would normally only have once slice of cake. It’s probably because you have to eat one straight from the oven when the chocolate is oozing from within and they are still pretty dough like. Later on it would be churlish not to partake in a cooler cookie with your tea, letting your cup catch the crumbs so you can slurp them up later.

Pineapple White Chocolate and Coconut Cookies

My husband is also a bit of a dried fruit fanatic, there are usually odds and ends of trail mix or some exotic papaya strips that never seem remotely appealing to me. However, these candied pineapple chunks have been winking at me for weeks begging to be used in a recipe. I am not normally a pineapple junkie but I have found myself craving their sweet juicy acidity so whilst a few months ago I would have shuddered at including them in a bake, this time round they were the first ingredient on my list when preparing to make my cookies.

I think it’s rude not to include chocolate in a cookie don’t you? That’s not to say I haven’t enjoyed the odd oat and raisin number in my time but I usually think a bit of a chocolate addition would liven up the proceedings immensely. This time round I poured in a few handfuls of white chocolate chips, which are the type of chocolate oft neglected from my bakes, but here they seemed so right.

The desiccated coconut was added just because I cannot bear to bake or cook anything without coconut at the moment. I thought I would be bored by now after my endless forays of coconut oil, coconut flour, coconut flakes and coconut milk but it’s just so damn versatile in all its different formats and there is usually a place for it in whatever I am cooking.

Pineapple White Chocolate and Coconut Cookies

Now these cookies are huge, so make sure you space them apart a good distance in your baking tray. They are chewy but also a little crisp on the corners for the variety of texture which is so important in your daily cookie. The true test was whether they would pass the husband test and they did with flying colours. The only problem is that now he sees no excuse why there can’t be cookies every day.

Pineapple, White Chocolate and Coconut Cookies
Makes 12 large cookies

175g unsalted butter
175g soft light brown sugar
125g caster sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 eggs
200g plain flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
¼ teaspoon salt
150g jumbo rolled oats
75g desiccated coconut
125g white chocolate chips
125g dried pineapple chunks

  1. Pre-heat oven to 170°C.
  2. Cream the butter and sugars together until very light and fluffy.
  3. Add the eggs one at a time then the vanilla until completely combined.
  4. In a large mixing bowl whisk together the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, salt, oats and coconut.
  5. Add the flour mixture to the rest of the batter and mix until combined.
  6. Finally mix in the chocolate chips and pineapple chunks until evenly dispersed.
  7. Portion out the cookies by weighing out each one out to 100g then rolling into a ball.
  8. Place each ball on large baking trays about 2 inches apart from each other and flatten each ball slightly with the palm of your hand.
  9. Bake in the oven for 12-15 minutes until just turning golden brown.
  10. Remove from the oven and leave to cool on the baking tray for 5 minutes until transferring to a cooling rack to finish cooling. Or, eat straightaway so the cookie is warm and the chocolate is still melting.

Grain-Free Coconut and Chia Porridge

This healthy and satisfying Grain-Free Coconut and Chia Porridge is a slightly different take on soaked chia puddings since all the ingredients are cooked together just before eating and eaten warm like regular porridge.

overhead shot of Grain-Free Coconut Chia Porridge in a bowl

I never know what to have for breakfast, it’s always been a complete stumbling block for me since there are a bunch of breakfast foods I don’t get on with, I’m looking at you eggs! Then with this pregnancy I’m feeling especially fussy. I like my breakfast simple, quick and healthy and now it’s January and I’m looking ahead to the incredibly life changing year that’s in store for me I want to treasure my body and start each day with good intentions, even if I have succumbed to my Christmas chocolate stash by 4pm.

side shot of Grain-Free Coconut Chia Porridge in a bowl

I’ve been making this Grain-Free Coconut and Chia Porridge for the past few mornings and it has fit my fussy bill completely. It’s not too sweet, it’s dairy free, has lots of protein from the chia seeds, nuts and coconut and sets you in good stead for the day.

ingredients for Grain-Free Coconut Chia Porridge

Grain-Free Coconut Chia Porridge being stirred in a saucepan

You can buy chia seeds from any health food shop and they are good to go on anything but they are especially good when paired with liquid. When cooked into the coconut milk they swell up to form little creamy bubbles which pop in the mouth. The texture is what this porridge has in spades. Often I think I care more about the texture of a food than the taste and this one has it all; the creaminess of the coconut, the slight crunch of the almonds, the chew of the figs and the pearly goodness of the chia. It’s a terribly satisfying breakfast.

Chia Seeds

Since this only takes about 10 minutes to prepare I have been rustling it up with no effort in the mornings and it’s a nice change from the regular Coconut Chia Puddings which require overnight soaking which I can’t always be relied upon to do.

overhead shot of Grain-Free Coconut Chia Porridge in a bowl

I serve mine with either toasted coconut shavings or sliced banana, perhaps even an extra drizzle of maple syrup if I dare.

Print Recipe
Grain-Free Coconut and Chia Porridge
This healthy and satisfying Grain-Free Coconut and Chia Porridge is a slightly different take on soaked chia puddings since all the ingredients are cooked together just before eating and eaten warm like regular porridge.
overhead shot of Grain-Free Coconut Chia Porridge in a bowl
Course breakfast
Cuisine British
Keyword chia
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 8 minutes
Passive Time 10 minutes
Servings
1
Ingredients
  • 200 ml coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
  • 25 g desiccated coconut
  • 30 g whole almonds toasted then roughly chopped
  • 40 g dried figs roughly chopped, about 2
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
Course breakfast
Cuisine British
Keyword chia
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 8 minutes
Passive Time 10 minutes
Servings
1
Ingredients
  • 200 ml coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
  • 25 g desiccated coconut
  • 30 g whole almonds toasted then roughly chopped
  • 40 g dried figs roughly chopped, about 2
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
overhead shot of Grain-Free Coconut Chia Porridge in a bowl
Instructions
  1. Place all the ingredients in a medium sized saucepan.
  2. Bring everything to a gentle boil as you stir it all together.
  3. Turn off the heat and let stand for 10 minutes so all the coconut milk is absorbed.
  4. Serve with a topping of your choice.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Easy Overnight Coconut Chia Pudding

Easy Overnight Coconut Chia Puddings are a refrigerator staple. It takes 10 minutes to prepare and a night to ready itself to become a week-long lifesaver.

Everything But The… Bircher Museli

Everything But The... Bircher Museli

Sweet Potato and Bacon Rosti

overhead shot of Sweet Potato and Bacon Rosti on a metal tray with tahini sauce

Calypso Chicken

Calypso Chicken
Years ago when my mum was going through a bit of a clear out of a forgotten part of the attic, she came across my father’s old collection of food magazines from the 1980s. With no interest in them herself she offered them to me which I thrillingly accepted and I have been lugging them around with me ever since from house to house, bookshelf to bookshelf, much to my husband’s consternation.

Taste Magazines

They are an absolutely fascinating read and I pick them up every so often when I need a little bit of inspiration that pinterest and my many food blogs sometimes can’t give me with their wonderfully retro recipes and advertisements for Ambrosia custard. Last week I was thinking about the current food revolution in the UK but these magazines go to show that most of us have always cared about the provenance of food and great recipes.

These Taste magazines feel very different to today’s Olive, Delicious or Observer Food Monthly, there are a huge amount of lengthy articles, illustrated recipes and not much in the way of news and only a little on restaurants. Plus, for the most part, the photos, when they are not amusing in their rigid construction with the cooks hovering over the dining tables with magnificent perms and billowing blouses, are frankly a little off putting. I can while away hours flicking through these magazines, some of the articles are still relevant and there is just the same breadth of culturally diverse recipes as modern magazines cover today. Our generation didn’t invent the foodie, they have always existed but now they are just a bit louder, more demanding and they write food blogs.

Rum and Coconut Chicken | Stroud Green Larder

Rum and Coconut Chicken | Stroud Green Larder

Rum and Coconut Chicken | Stroud Green Larder

Rum and Coconut Chicken | Stroud Green Larder

I got a little bit lost in some of the magazines again this morning when I revisited them. Topics covered within the pages range from sections tasting the best supermarket canned sardines. There are articles extolling the virtues of cream, a lovely account of a visit to Beatrix Potter’s country garden and a very detailed piece on drying herbs. Another piece written about modern technology champions the microwave and there is also a hard hitting investigation on whether a couple can live on one 3 kg chicken for a week. Spoiler, they could but they wouldn’t want to. Nail biting stuff.

The recipes themselves range from an exploration of food on sticks to a complicated dish of jellied seafood followed by chicken mousse, which they claim is perfect for a romantic lunch to celebrate the royal wedding. Having spent the week making endless use of the blackberries which I have been foraging there is a lovely looking blackberry and caramel soft scoop ice cream recipe which I wish I had seen a few days ago. Although I did turn my nose up rather snobbishly at a hot potato and frankfurter salad and a low fat recipe for hollandaise which recommends replacing the butter with margarine, eww.

Taste Magazine

However, this recipe for Calypso Chicken which was nestled in a piece about Floella Benjamin’s Caribbean food heritage leapt out at me as soon as I read it. I didn’t think I had ever braised chicken in rum before but suddenly as I began to imagine the possibilities the whole world made total sense. It used creamed coconut, an ingredient which is more than often replaced in modern recipes with coconut milk. Plus angostura bitters is one of my favourite things to use in the kitchen, I usually add it to my fruit pie fillings but I can be more liberal now I know how much it lends to savoury dishes too. Alcohol plus cooking only signals good and tasty things.

I have been messing around with the recipe a little bit, changing the chicken breast to chicken legs to garner more flavour, and upping the quantities of some of the ingredients for more impact. The rum, ahem. It is a brilliant chicken recipe, so easy to put together with a perfect balance of spice in the rich coconut rum sauce. I have been serving mine with crisply fried plantain and fresh chillies sprinkled on top which sparks it off deliciously and have made it several times in the past couple of weeks.

Rum and Coconut Chicken | Stroud Green Larder

Expect to see more 80s recipes soon, now I have started I am going to find it difficult to stop. And I haven’t even begun discussing the crazily elaborate desserts, suffice to say they involve a lot of moulds, jellies and unnecessary garnishes.

Calypso Chicken
Adapted from Taste magazine, March 1987
Serves 4

4 chicken legs, boned
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp garlic powder
½ tsp chilli powder
½ tsp salt
black pepper
2 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, sliced
1 green pepper, de-seeded and sliced
500ml chicken stock
50g creamed coconut
3 tbsp dark rum
good dash of angostura bitters
pinch of saffron
Chopped fresh chilli and parsley to serve

  1. Mix the cumin, garlic powder, chilli powder and salt and pepper together then rub generously over the chicken legs.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large casserole dish on the hob and as soon as it’s hot add the chicken, skin side down.
  3. Fry the chicken for 10-12 minutes until the skin is crisp and golden. Then with a pair of tongs remove the chicken, set aside and add the onion and green pepper to the casserole dish.
  4. Heat the stock in a small saucepan until boiling, then remove from the heat and add the creamed coconut, rum, angostura bitters and saffron until they are well mixed together.
  5. As soon as the onion and green pepper has softened and are staring to colour in the casserole add the stock mixture, stirring in well with the onions and peppers. Bring up to a gentle boil, then turn the heat down to a simmer. Add the chicken on top of the stock, flesh side down and simmer for 40 minutes until the sauce has reduced to thick and creamy.
  6. Sprinkle with chopped fresh chilli and parsley, then serve with crisp plantain.

Coconut Crisp Chicken: Day 14 of Whole30

Coconut Crisp Chicken
No, the lack of sugar hasn’t caused me to hurl myself off a cliff, if you’re wondering why I haven’t been documenting the last few days of my Whole30 journey. As it happens, I am doing quite well on Whole30 thanks for asking.   Well, in as much as I haven’t fallen off the wagon but the mere mention of a gin and tonic or a Cadbury’s Boost will send me apoplectic, so please don’t. To revive myself for the second half of the Whole30 challenge I have had a mini break from the kitchen these past few days and have been eating other people’s food. A veritable storm of working in Central London, fitting in some running, making all my meals and sorting out the three monsters, four if you include my husband, culminated in me throwing in the tea towel and hot footing it to the nearest paleo accommodating restaurants over the weekend.

Coconut Crisp Chicken  |  Stroud Green Larder

I ate Vietnamese salads and stir fries at the Song Que Café on Kingsland Road and lots of vegetable tapas and grilled octopus at La Vina in Harringay. I even managed to find something at the farmers’ market and enjoyed Moroccan tagine with salad instead of couscous in Ally Pally this Sunday. Perfectly doable but I have to say ordering soda water instead of a chilled glass of Chablis has been a little tough. Still, I’m almost halfway through so at least things are looking up.

Coconut Crisp Chicken  |  Stroud Green Larder

Another key ingredient of making this diet bearable, besides letting someone else do the hard work for a couple of days, is when I can indulge in a bit of a paleo treat and this coconut crisp chicken really is that. This is something I have been making for a while anyway, way before my Whole30 kicked off. The recipe evolved when I started reading about southern fried buttermilk chicken and the buttermilk brine that is used to soak the chicken in overnight before the fry. This method of brining chicken is genius and makes it so tender and perfectly seasoned, especially with the addition of spicy chipotle powder and paprika. I have been working on adapting the buttermilk solution for coconut milk to fit in with a paleo lifestyle and have enjoyed it every time I have been slowly tweaking and perfecting the recipe over the past few months. I think with this final version I have cracked it and it may be my favourite recipe of Whole30 yet. It is utterly delicious accompanied by a zesty lime slaw made of chinese cabbage and sprinkled with coconut flakes to up the coconut ante.

Coconut Crisp Chicken  |  Stroud Green Larder

When you think fried chicken it just carries such an air of unhealthiness to it that it puts people off. However, this recipe is using coconut oil and also, not as much as you think, just a couple of tablespoons melted into a wide bottomed pan are enough to aid the cooking and crisp up your coating. The ingredients here cover the gamut of coconut products lurking in my kitchen, as well as the coconut milk and coconut oil, we have coconut flour to dredge and desiccated coconut to bread the chicken. It’s fragrant and wonderful but do bear in mind that the coconut crisp is a bit more delicate than if you made it with plain old flour and breadcrumbs so be gentle when removing it from the pan.

Coconut Crisp Chicken  |  Stroud Green Larder

Oh, and Puppy joined Doggy Day Care this week and so I couldn’t resist including this photo of the little tyke having the time of his life in the open fields of Hertfordshire.

Billy Buddy

Coconut Crisp Chicken
Serves 2

2 chicken breasts
½ tin coconut milk (200ml)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp hot paprika
½ tsp smoked garlic powder
30g coconut oil
50g Coconut flour
1 egg, lightly beaten
50g desiccated coconut

In a large bowl whisk together the coconut milk, salt, paprika and garlic powder until combined.
Take your chicken breasts and with a meat mallet pummel them until they have flattened down to a 1.5cm even thickness.
Dunk the chicken into the coconut milk mixture and mix in to coat thoroughly. Place cling film on the top of the bowl and leave to marinate for at least 1 hour but overnight if possible.
Place the flour, egg and desiccated coconut in 3 separate bowls.
Bring the chicken out of the marinade, shaking off the excess. Dip the chicken first in the flour, coating on all sides, then the egg, and then the dessicated coconut, making sure it’s evenly coated.
In a large frying pan heat the coconut oil, then when hot add the chicken. Cook for 3-4 minutes on each side. Remove from the pan and serve immediately.

Escape (The Pinã Colada Cake)

(Escape) The Pina Colada Cake

This recipe is not yet gluten-free

One of the film websites I read recently had a feature where all the contributors had written about the worst tropes which are fallen back on time and time again on film and TV. One particular entry on this list decried the timeworn use of characters dancing in the kitchen. The writer said it was clichéd, unrealistic and twee. ‘C’mon, who does that?’ they lamented. Well, I do as it happens. I do it a lot to boot and I don’t mind who knows it. Obviously.

The two examples of this common trope which immediately spring to mind are at the end of Mermaids which I re-watched last week where they wiggle along to ‘If You Wanna Be Happy’ whilst setting the table. This scene not only led me to become obsessed with that song when I was young, but also made me desperate to be part of their wackadoo family. As a sidenote, I was extra surprised and saddened to hear of Bob Hoskins’ passing a few days ago as it felt like I had only just seen him on top form, I had forgotten he was in Mermaids and on my re-watch his was the performance I enjoyed the most. Such a wonderful actor.

The second example is in the classic episode of Dawson’s Creek when the gang all band together to save the Potter B&B by dancing around the kitchen at breakfast time. Of course their dancing seduces the grouchy critic Mr Fricke into thinking that the Potter B&B is the best place he’s ever stayed in the world and they get a stellar write up. Works every time; Four in a Bed take note. I refuse to believe that these moments are embarrassment ridden or cheesy but they certainly serve as encouragement for me to dance more, for better or for worse.

Pina Colada Cake  |  Stroud Green Larder

In our house we love to dance badly everywhere, the poorer the dancing is the better. We throw ourselves around to the radio first thing in the morning, in the sitting room to perk us up on a Saturday afternoon and most importantly and significantly for this post, in the kitchen. Whilst waiting for butter and sugar to cream, whilst thumbing through cookbooks and most common of all when we are doing the washing up. It is the only thing that makes the dreary chore remotely bearable.

From his very first afternoon in our house whilst we were making the Sunday lunch Puppy has found our love of crazy dancing the best thing in the world. All I have to do is start to shimmy a little bit in time with Katy Perry and he has jumped up ecstatically, paws reaching for my hands so we can prance round the kitchen absurdly like a couple of escaped lunatics. The cats aren’t as impressed.

There are a few songs which absolutely guarantee a good old bop, our current favourite is Pharrell Williams’ Happy which is just invokes such joy but also sends me into fits as it goes hand in hand with those gosh darn hilarious minions. A particular favourite though, and you’ll be happy to know I am now coming to the crux of the matter, is Escape (The Pinã Colada Song) by Rupert Holmes. We always put it on when feeling gloomy to cheer ourselves up. As soon as its opening drum beat kicks in Puppy immediately assumes the Tom Cruise from Cocktail swagger, well if Tom Cruise were tiny, furry, four-legged and drunk; still he has the charm in spades.

Pina Colada Cake  |  Stroud Green Larder

I was obviously listening to this song when I dreamt up this cake and the thought of it makes me smile, not just because it’s delicious but it also incorporates all the happy-go-lucky flavours of sunshine and paradise. It reminds me of dancing round my kitchen with my family and most importantly, it has glace cherries.

I have made this cake several times now and usually when I make something repeatedly I like to tweak things here and there, perhaps modify the icing, take a layer out, change the decoration. This incarnation though was perfect the first time I baked it and I have made it the same way ever since, even down to the number of cocktail umbrellas on the top.

This cake was made this week for a double celebration, it was a request from my husband whose birthday it was a few days ago and I also wanted to include it here to mark my official 99th post. Now, many people may choose to celebrate going into triple figures but hey I like 99. Plus it’s the bank holiday so I wanted to make sure this recipe was on offer to you should you want to make it and dream you are escaping to a tropical island.

Pina Colada Cake  |  Stroud Green Larder

Escape (The Pinã Colada Cake)

Coconut and Malibu Cake
Adapted from Dan Lepard’s recipe in Short and Sweet

150ml coconut milk
50g unsweetened desiccated coconut
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
60ml Malibu
300g caster sugar
250g unsalted butter, softened
3 eggs
275g plain flour
2½ teaspoons baking powder

  1. Heat the coconut milk until boiling then remove from the heat and stir in the desiccated coconut, vanilla and Malibu. Leave to soak for 30 minutes so the coconut softens.
  2. Meanwhile heat the oven to 180°C then line and grease 3 x 20cm round sandwich tins.
  3. Beat the butter and sugar in a stand mixer on high for about 5 minutes until the mixture is light and fluffy.
  4. Add the eggs one at a time until evenly combined.
  5. Sift the flour with the baking powder. Fold into the butter, sugar and eggs alternately with the coconut mixture until just incorporated.
  6. Divide between the tins and bake for 20-25 minutes.

Pineapple Curd

1 227g tin pineapple chunks, whizzed up with juice in blender
3 egg yolks
2½ tablespoons cornflour
75g caster sugar

  1. In a small bowl blend the cornflour with a bit of the whizzed up pineapple until it’s formed a smooth paste.
  2. Put all the ingredients in a saucepan and stir constantly on a medium heat until it begins to boil. Turn down heat and keep stirring as it thickens. Remove from heat and leave to cool.

Pineapple Frosting

8 egg whites (or 240g egg whites)
400g caster sugar
540g unsalted butter, room temperature and cut into cubes
¼ teaspoon salt
250g pineapple curd

  1. Heat egg whites and caster sugar in a bain-marie, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved and the temperature has reached 160°F.
  2. Remove the egg whites and sugar from the heat and pour into a stand mixer with whisk attachment. Whisk until the mixture forms stiff peaks.
  3. Change the attachment to a paddle attachment. On a low speed add the butter slowly cube by cube. When you have almost added all the butter the mixture will curdle curiously. Do not fret – this is supposed to happen. Just continue to add all the butter. Once the butter is totally incorporated the frosting will miraculously become a smooth velvety consistency.
  4. Add the salt and the pineapple curd. Mix in quickly and lightly.

Decorate the cake with toasted desiccated coconut, sun-dried pineapple, glace cherries and cocktail umbrellas.