Boxing Day Ale Chutney

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

This Boxing Day Ale Chutney is the perfect addition to your cheeseboard. It’s also particularly delicious with leftover Christmas ham or turkey. Sweetly spiced with chunky vegetables and plenty of tang.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day is definitely my favourite day over the holiday period. It has none of the high expectations of Christmas Day. There’s no early morning hysteria or panic because you forgot to put the turkey on/buy the Brussels/wrap Adrian’s present. I spend most of Christmas Day in the kitchen, rushing back and forth between filling glasses with Bucks Fizz, trying to be with the children for the opening of every present and shooing Billy Buddy away from the mince pies. It’s exhausting.

mid shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day has none of that palaver though. You can lie in, well you can if you don’t have children. It’s not frowned upon to have chocolate for breakfast as it’s technically still Christmas and all those Lindor Lindts have to be demolished before New Year. You’re free to spend all day watching movies, drinking the Bucks Fizz you didn’t really have time for the day before whilst wearing your new Christmas jammies. Plus you can eschew cooking for cheese, biscuits and cold cuts and the trifle that you prepared on Christmas Eve. At least that’s how I roll with Boxing Day and I will not compromise it for anyone.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

As anyone knows who has prepared a Boxing Day buffet for all the Christmas Day stragglers the accompaniments for your cheese and meats are so important. It’s all very well splashing out on decent stilton and the good oatcakes but since you are dumbing down the cooking aspect of it then the effort has to show somewhere so you can still wear your perfect host/hostess crown with pride. This is when preparing your Boxing Day Ale Chutney early doors in December will pay off dividends.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

I have been making this Boxing Day Ale Chutney for a few years now when I realised I needed a more everyman’s pickle to go with the cheeseboard. I had Courgette Relish and Stem Ginger and Apple Chutney but my family were clamouring for more of a ploughmans preserve. This Boxing Day Ale Chutney fits the bill absolutely. It’s simple to make since after only 15 minutes of chopping you just throw everything into a large saucepan to get to know each other. It doesn’t have a long cooking time compared to other chutneys, just an hour or two, and can pretty much be eaten straight away. However, if you decant into sterilised jars then it will also keep for a good few months, or until you open it on Boxing Day.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day Ale Chutney is beautifully chunky with root vegetables, sweet with tomatoes, dates, spices and gluten-free pale ale. It’s also tangy with cider vinegar and mustard so holds its own against strong cheese and robust meats.

The best thing is if you decide to get ahead and make your chutney now then you’ll have plenty of jars to give away as Christmas presents. Then all your friends and relatives can reap the benefit of your Boxing Day Ale Chutney too. I guarantee they will be begging for the recipe.

mid shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

If you make this Boxing Day Ale Chutney then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious creation, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Boxing Day Ale Chutney

Boxing Day Ale Chutney is the perfect addition to your cheeseboard. It’s also particularly delicious with leftover Christmas ham or turkey. Sweetly spiced with chunky vegetables and plenty of tang.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Total Time1 hr 50 mins
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: British
Servings: 120 servings
Calories: 23kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 onions about 400g
  • 1 swede about 375g chopped
  • 2 large carrots about 300g carrots
  • 3 granny smith apples
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled and diced
  • 175 g dates pitted
  • 140 g tomato puree
  • 325 g light soft brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons black treacle
  • 300 ml cider vinegar
  • tablespoons mustard powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground mace
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 500 ml gluten-free pale ale

Instructions

  • First peel and chop the vegetables into even 1.5cm sized cubes.
  • Put all ingredients into a large preserving pot with 150ml water and 250ml of the ale.
  • Bring to a gentle simmer, stirring occasionally, and cook for an hour.
  • Take the chutney off the heat and pour in the rest of the ale.
  • Return the chutney to the heat and cook for a further 30 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat and decant into sterilised jars*.

Notes

This recipe is slightly adapted from Hearty Ale Chutney from Preserves: River Cottage Handbook No.2 by Pam Corbin The chutney will keep up to a year if stored in a cool dark place.
*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.
The chutney will keep up to a year if stored in a cool dark place.
Yield 10 190g jars.

Nutrition

Calories: 23kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Sodium: 12mg | Potassium: 49mg | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 180IU | Vitamin C: 1.4mg | Calcium: 8mg | Iron: 0.1mg

SHOP THE RECIPE

I find my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue absolutely indispensable when I’m making any type of preserve or indeed anything in the kitchen. It’s very heavy duty but I use it for absolutely everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.


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Courgette Relish

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Cranberry Clementine Sauce

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Pickled Golden Beetroot

This Pickled Golden Beetroot is crisp and vinegary with a hint of sweetness from honey. An essential addition to your autumn cheeseboard.

Pickled Golden Beetroot

This post has been re-posted from 2013 as I’ve updated the photos and the recipe to make the instructions clearer. Reading back it seems a simpler time without a toddler thrown into the mix, before I started selling my preserves and when we had a study and not a nursery. Also, I still cut my beetroot into chunks rather than slice them – ever awkward.

‘Tis the season to be pickling, jarring, canning, jamming. A wonderfully therapeutic pastime, certainly not made more challenging with a bouncing eight-week-old puppy swirling around your feet as you are carrying searing hot jars out of the scalding water of their water bath. No siree, easy peasy pudding and… holy mother of hot water. Don’t worry only the cook was harmed in the canning of this beetroot. Turns out puppies don’t make good sous chefs, this one will have to be trained by Wesley who was very helpful in preparing the beetroot.

My shelves are laden with goodies for the coming winter, for if the apocalypse should rain down upon us I am safe in the knowledge that I can feed two cats, a puppy and a husband with chutneys, jellies and marmalades for a good few months.  A rainbow of colours has been cast on my cheap thrown together bookshelves which certainly doesn’t get me in trouble every time I balance a further few kilos of canned goods amongst the books.  The study is slowly morphing into the pantry and I couldn’t be more thrilled.
I found these gleaming chaps buried under an inch of soil at the farmers market, their inner beauty only truly shining through after they had been boiled and peeled. They truly are a beautiful vegetable. I can’t wait until Christmas when they will be adorning buffet tables and being included in late night cheddar cheese sandwiches with crusty bread.

It was only afterwards that comments were made upon my decision to quarter the beetroot rather than slice it as apparently it makes for rather awkward cheese and beetroot sandwiches. Ah, screw ‘em.

Pickled Golden Beetroot

 Just a word to the wise, although I won’t hammer home the point like some of the recipes I read which made canning beetroot sound terribly frightening, the acidity in this particular vegetable is very low so vinegar quantities cannot be messed with unless you want to kill off your whole family on Boxing Day with botulism. For my water bath I use a huge preserving pan that I bought for a few pounds from Ikea many years ago and it has been of invaluable use, being sufficiently deep and wide for this purpose. I would recommend though, that if you haven’t used a water bath for canning before, then do read up on it thoroughly before you go so you have all the right information.

Pickled Golden Beetroot

Pickled Golden Beetroot

This Pickled Golden Beetroot is crisp and vinegary with a hint of sweetness from honey. An essential addition to your autumn cheeseboard.
Prep Time40 mins
Cook Time1 hr 20 mins
Total Time2 hrs
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: British
Servings: 8 190g jars
Calories: 93kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 kg golden beetroot
  • 720 ml cider vinegar
  • 50 g honey
  • teaspoons salt
  • cinnamon sticks
  • ¼ teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 270 ml water

Instructions

  • Wash the beetroot thoroughly then cook it whole submerged in boiling water for about half an hour.
  • Drain them and dunk them in a bowl of icy water, then remove and rub off their skins.
  • Cut the beetroot into large pieces.
  • Meanwhile prepare the water bath. Place a tea towel or wire trivet in the bottom of your pan so your jars do not touch the bottom of the pan and fill with water and 2 teaspoons of vinegar*. Bring to the boil, it should be at a rolling boil for a good 15 minutes before you add your jars. This is also a good time to sterilise your jars and lids.**
  • In a saucepan add the vinegar, honey, salt, cinnamon, peppercorns and water and bring to a boil. As soon as it is boiling add your beetroot then bring it back up to a boil. When it reaches a simmer then turn off.
  • Quickly divide the beetroot and liquid between your jars leaving a bit of headspace in the neck of the jar. Remove the air bubbles with a chopstick and place the lids on, adjusting so that it is just finger tight.
  • Submerge your jars into the water bath so that they are covered by an inch of water and sitting upright on the tea towel or trivet. Pop the lid on and boil full blast for 30 minutes.
  • Remove the jars with a jar lifter and leave them undisturbed in a safe place until they have cooled down completely. Test the lids to make sure they have been sealed and don’t pop up when pressed.
  • These can be stored for about a year and eaten whenever you want in between.

Notes

*The vinegar is added to ensure the jars stay lovely and clean when in the waterbath, otherwise the boiling water can give them an unattractive film.
**To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.

Nutrition

Calories: 93kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 2g | Sodium: 540mg | Potassium: 471mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 40IU | Vitamin C: 6.1mg | Calcium: 33mg | Iron: 1.3mg

Pickled Mirabelles

These Pickled Mirabelles are a deliciously sweet sour accompaniment to any cheese or charcuterie platter.

My preserving habit is out of control. Our vast array of jarred goods are now happily commandeering every single shelf in our fridge. So much so that I have banned myself from doing any further food shopping until we have started to finish off some of the contents of those jars. It’s easier said than done as every little jar has its own special purpose in our kitchen:

All these preserves are needed, constantly used and enjoyed.

Pickled Mirabelles

The worst thing is that yesterday, I added another jar to the fridge so really I might as well forego proper meals completely and just dig into the horseradish with a spoon and call it lunch. Meet these wonderfully addictive Pickled Mirabelles.

What are mirabelles?

The mirabelle is a small stone fruit from the plum family. They can most commonly be found in Lorraine in France, although the ones I used were from Essex, and have a short season in the late summer. They are yellow, tiny and particularly sweet and juicy. Mirabelles make a very lovely jam, but here we’re doing something a little bit different.

Pickling fruits

Pickling fruits is incredibly satisfying and excellent way to use up a glut of fruit that isn’t dessert based. They make a wonderful addition to any cheeseboard or charcuterie platter. When we brought a kilo of mirabelles home from the farmers’ market I knew they would be ideal for this purpose.

This is a simple recipe to follow, one of those assembly type affairs where you more or less put everything in a saucepan, bring to the boil for a few minutes then decant into jars. Really, the best kind of preserving.

Pickled Mirabelles

These Pickled Mirabelles are golden and jewel like in the jar, and when you remove them they sparkle in the October sunshine making them look utterly irresistible.They taste sweet with just a touch of sourness which makes them absolutely ideal with cheese or cold meats. They do have a small stone in the middle though so you must be careful when you pop them in your mouth that you don’t break your tooth.

What can you do with the leftover pickling syrup?

Don’t throw that leftover pickling syrup away whatever you do. It has a myriad of uses in your kitchen, not least:

  • salad dressings – whisked in with a little extra vinegar and olive oil
  • stews or casseroles – image a couple of tablespoons in one of your family favourite dishes. A pinch of sweet and sourness.
  • marinades – you can marinate chicken breasts or thighs in this syrup. Then grill or roast for a delicious dinner.

Pickled Mirabelles

If you are looking for some more stone fruit recipes then how about:

Plum Nectarine Cornbread Cobbler
Plum Brown Butter Almond Cake
Damson Orange Cinnamon Jam

If you make these Pickled Mirabelles then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Pickled Mirabelles

A deliciously sweet sour accompaniment to any cheese or charcuterie platter
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time14 mins
Resting time1 hr
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: British
Servings: 1 kg

Ingredients

  • 1 kg mirabelles
  • 600 ml cider vinegar
  • ½ cinnamon stick
  • 900 g granulated sugar
  • 4 cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg

Instructions

  • Prick each Mirabelle with a cocktail stick so the fruit doesn’t split in the pan, the place in a large saucepan with the rest of the ingredients.
  • Bring to a boil, then simmer for 4 minutes.
  • Take off the heat and remove the mirabelles with a slotted spoon, decanting into sterilised jars.
  • Place the syrupy vinegar back onto the heat then bring back to a boil and keep at a rolling boil for about 10 minutes until the syrup reduces slightly. Remove from the heat and leave to cool.
  • Once cooled, spoon the syrup into the jars with the mirabelles until filled and seal.
  • If there is any vinegar syrup left over then decant into a separate bottle and use for salad dressings.

Notes

Adapted from Diana Henry’s 'Cerises au Vinegar' in Salt Sugar Smoke