Gluten-Free Coffee and Walnut Cake

A beautifully simple gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake made with teff flour and walnut flour.

gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake on a wooden board

At the beginning of summer I start thinking of crowd pleasing bakes to donate to the various cake stalls coming our way. I usually make a few cake promises to the school fairs, village fetes and neighbourhood festivals. These cake stalls make their money by selling good homely British baking and I’m always happy to contribute.

Not counting my own market stall I was a Women’s Institute member (and President) for many years and know my way around a local cake stall. At these local festivals there is always an enthusiastic crowd circling the cake stall and there are a certain few cakes that the customers expect to see.

gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake on a wooden board

When I would help co-ordinate the volunteers and bakers for an upcoming cake stall we would accept any offering. However we also had a checklist of bakes that absolutely had to be included:

Victoria Sponge
Brownies
Lemon Drizzle Cake
Chocolate Cake
Flapjacks
Carrot Cake

And you betcha there had better be a Coffee and Walnut Cake. Riots are not usually on the agenda at the Crouch End Festival.

At the same time as the resolutely traditional bakes there has in recent years been a call for gluten-free, vegan and sugar-free cakes. These are usually the ones I donate as you can imagine. I love blending traditional recipes with modern alternative flours to serve both needs.

This Coffee and Walnut Cake is based around a classic recipe. However it has been modernised through using flavourful flours which gives so much more personality to this British stalwart. And makes it gluten-free to boot.

gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake on a wooden board

How to make a Gluten-Free Coffee and Walnut Cake

The key to a delicious gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake is:

  • Teff flour

If you don’t know anything about teff flour then visit this post which dives deep into the subject. It is an incredibly tasty flour with hints of molasses and spices. An absolute natural pairing to the coffee and nuts in this cake, adding a beautiful complexity of flavour.

process shots of making a gluten-free coffee and walnut cake

We blend the teff flour with:

  • Tapioca Flour – for helping the cake hold together so it’s not dry and crumbly
  • Walnut Flour – for the unmistakable taste of walnuts. We grind walnut halves into a ‘flour’ to give the cake a moist crumb. The flour allows the walnut flavour to permeate the whole cake.

ALTERNATIVE FLOUR: Buckwheat flour also works beautifully in this cake and gives it more of an earthy taste. Just swap the teff for equal amounts of buckwheat if you like that idea.

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process shots of making a gluten-free coffee and walnut cake

This Gluten-Free Coffee and Walnut Cake is a straightforward cake to make and uses the creaming method for a beautifully light sponge.

  1. Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
  2. Add the egg one at a time.
  3. Grind the walnuts in a food processor.
  4. Mix the walnuts with the rest of the dry ingredients.
  5. Add the dry ingredients to the wet.
  6. Divide between two 8 inch cake tins.
  7. Bake for 20-25 minutes then cool.
  8. For the icing beat the butter and icing sugar until light and creamy.
  9. Add the coffee and salt to the icing then ice the cake.

Bakers Tips:

  • When grinding your walnuts make sure you don’t take them too far. If they start to turn into walnut butter then the walnuts will have released too much oil and will make the cake greasy. The walnuts should be like crumble.
  • When making your icing you want to beat the butter and icing sugar for about 6-8 minutes so the icing is ultra light and creamy.

Slices of gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake on a wooden board

What kind of coffee do you use in Coffee and Walnut Cake?

For this cake we use barista style instant coffee as it’s so easy. You can add it straight in without mixing with water. I like the Nescafe Azera brand and use this whenever I need a fresh coffee flavour.

There is no difference in the cake sponge at all, just a lovely clean coffee taste. It’s beautiful in the icing too, flecking like tiny polka dots against the white icing.

How long will Gluten-Free Coffee and Walnut Cake keep?

This Gluten-Free Coffee Cake will keep in an airtight tin for up to three days.

Cut slice of a gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake

If you are looking for easy gluten-free bakes to take to a cake or bake sale then hop on over to the following recipes:

The Ultimate Popcorn Rocky Road
Red Velvet Cake
No-Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Crispy Bars

If you make this Gluten-Free Coffee and Walnut Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Gluten-Free Coffee and Walnut Cake

A beautifully simple gluten-free Coffee and Walnut Cake made with teff flour and walnut flour.

Prep Time25 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: British
Keyword: gluten-free coffee and walnut cake recipe
Servings: 10 people
Calories: 710kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 200 g soft light brown sugar
  • 200 g unsalted butter room temperature
  • 4 eggs medium
  • 125 g teff flour
  • 100 g walnuts plus extra to decorate
  • 50 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons instant coffee powder

Icing

  • 300 g unsalted butter room temperature
  • 300 g icing sugar
  • 1 tablespoon instant coffee powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180/ 160 fan and line and grease 2 x 20cm round cake tins.
  • Beat the sugar and butter together until light and fluffy.
  • Add the eggs one at a time until combined.
  • Place the walnuts in the food processor and grind them until they form fine crumbles.
  • Pour the ground walnuts into a large bowl then whisk to mix with the teff flour, tapioca flour, baking powder, salt and coffee powder.
  • Add the flour mix to the batter and mix until completely combined.
  • Divide the batter between the cake tins and bake for 20-25 minutes until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  • Remove from the oven and leave the cake layers to cool completely before icing.

Icing

  • Beat the butter together with the icing sugar and mix until incredibly light and fluffy.
  • Mix in the espresso powder and salt.
  • To assemble, divide the icing between the middle and the top of the cake and decorate with walnut halves.

Notes

  • WALNUTS: If your walnuts start to turn to butter in the corners of the food processor then you have taken them too far.
  • The instant coffee powder I use is Nescafe Azera.
  • This cake will keep for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

Nutrition

Calories: 710kcal | Carbohydrates: 66g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 49g | Saturated Fat: 27g | Cholesterol: 173mg | Sodium: 128mg | Potassium: 261mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 49g | Vitamin A: 26.9% | Vitamin C: 0.2% | Calcium: 11.3% | Iron: 10.5%

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This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Collage of images of a gluten-free coffee and walnut cake

Best Gluten-Free Blondies

Best Gluten-Free Blondies are a celebration of butterscotch and vanilla, studded with white chocolate and pecans.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

It’s taken me a while to get to a gluten-free blondie recipe which I truly love. Every so often I make a batch of blondies but I am usually a little disappointed by them. By their nature blondies are rich with butterscotch flavour but this can sometimes translate to a sickly sweet treat. Not so here. Thank goodness I persevered as these blondies I love. They charm with vanilla and have a delicious chewy but nutty bite.

However, without delay I want to let you into the trick to achieving the absolute best blondies so there’s no messing around and we get to the good stuff right away. The trick to these Gluten-Free Blondies is…

Coffee Powder.

The presence of a gentle hint of coffee powder seems to absorb the trappings of the sickly sweet blondie and balance it out, creating a blondie intense with butterscotch flavour without a sugar hangover.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

Stay tuned though as there are other steps, equally important, to ensure that these are the best blondies ever.

Brown That Butter!

Blondies need melted butter anyway to ensure their delightfully soft chewy texture so why not take it one step further. All you need to do is melt your butter a little longer than needed so that toasty nutty flavour develops. Your finished blondies will thank you for it.

It’s also necessary to use two different types of sugar here. It sounds a little bit of a faff but I do it in a lot of my recipes and it’s worth it. First we use light muscovado for its gentle molasses taste. We’re trying to evoke butterscotch here and light muscovado is the perfect choice. It also gives extra moisture to the bake so we’re leaning into the fudgey chew that we like so much. However, too much and we’ll have a sloppy blondie at the end of the day. The caster sugar gives a little bit more body to the blondie and a firmer texture.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

Gluten-Free Flours

Now we need to choose our gluten-free flours. If we’re looking for that butterscotch taste then there is only one contender. Oat flour. If you can’t tolerate oats then never fear, you can substitute with sorghum flour. However, if you can tolerate oats then go with them as their flavour was made for these blondies. We also need to add a bit of sweet rice flour to the mix, again the gentle flavour of sweet rice flour works well here. But we also need it for its starchy qualities, to help the blondie stick together and promote the chew factor. Finally a light touch of potato flour is included to balance out the two flours and help not make the batter too wet as it’s a hydroscopic flour.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

Add Ins

Finally we’re after some good add-ins. Blondies can be perfectly lovely plain but they are made even better with chopped white chocolate and pecans. We choose to chop our white chocolate into shards, some big some, small pieces. It’s a preferred choice rather than chocolate chips as some of the shards may melt into the batter during the bake which just tastes really good. We also keep some bigger shards for texture. A few chopped nuts in the mix work so well for taste and texture too and pecans are my preferred choice.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

If you make these Best Gluten-Free Blondies then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

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overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board
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5 from 1 vote

Best Gluten-Free Blondies

Gluten-Free Blondies are a celebration of butterscotch and vanilla, studded with white chocolate and pecans.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: American
Keyword: how to make gluten-free blondies
Servings: 12
Calories: 341kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 165 g unsalted butter
  • 125 g soft light brown muscovado sugar
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100 g sweet rice flour
  • 90 g oat flour
  • 35 g potato flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon coffee powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 100 g white chocolate chopped into small pieces
  • 75 g pecans roughly chopped

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan assisted/gas mark 4 and line and grease a 20cm square baking tin.
  • Brown the butter by melting the butter in a small saucepan over a medium heat. Once melted the butter will start hissing and cracking and forming little brown bits at the bottom of the pan. Wait until the noises start to subside and the butter smells toasty Remove from the heat straightaway and pour into a heatproof mixing bowl so it doesn’t begin to burn.
  • Stir the sugars into the butter, followed by the eggs and vanilla extract.
  • Sift the flours together, in a separate mixing bowl, with the baking powder, coffee powder and salt.
  • Beat the flour mix into the wet ingredients until completely combined.
  • Fold in the chopped white chocolate and pecans and pour the batter into the baking tin.
  • Bake for 30 minutes then leave in the tin to settle for 10 minutes.
  • Remove from the tin and leave to cool on a cooling rack before cutting into 12 bars.

Nutrition

Calories: 341kcal | Carbohydrates: 38g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 9g | Cholesterol: 58mg | Sodium: 122mg | Potassium: 176mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 23g | Vitamin A: 7.7% | Vitamin C: 0.1% | Calcium: 5.7% | Iron: 4.3%

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This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

This Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake is made with fresh caramelised pineapple and a touch of coconut for tropical flavour.

Overhead of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake with a pineapple and glass of caramel next to it.

Pineapple Upside Down Cake is the only thing Mum ever bakes and as such is the only cake I have ever baked with her, to my recollection. I have happy warm memories of it which Mum usually served as a dessert rather than a teatime treat. Often warm from the oven, the surface glistening with the golden pineapple rings and sticky from the caramel. She would serve it with lashings of custard and, despite as a child never liking pineapple, I always had a soft spot for this dessert. But like I say, it was the only one she made so I kinda had to if I wanted pudding.

To be honest, I am still on the fence about pineapple but thirty-something (very something) years into the game I actually might be coming around. Especially if there is caramel involved. Always if there is caramel involved.

Cut slice of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

This Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake is somewhat removed from my mum’s recipe and is definitely the teatime treat sort of a cake rather than a dessert. Even though you could obviously eat this cake for dessert. Any cake for dessert is good dessert. This cake still feels like the warm hug of home, although it does shy away from the Pineapple Upside Down Cake you might be more familiar with. That wasn’t my intention. I did originally want to pay homage to Mum’s delicious cake so I could make it for her birthday, which is just around the corner. However, once I started playing around with the recipe by swapping in some gluten-free flours and reading a lot of different Pineapple Upside Down Cake recipes, this final version is the one I fell in love with and wanted to add to the Pineapple Upside Down Cake canon. Jamie Oliver, I blame you for this as his Pineapple Upside Down Cake in his Comfort Food book definitely led me down my final direction.

Overhead of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake with a pineapple and glass of caramel next to it.

Coconut

The first key difference in this Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake will be the initial step you take as you make the recipe. The inclusion of coconut. It makes the cake the most delicious consistency, a little chewy but bursting with tropical flavour. Both desiccated coconut and coconut milk are included here for the perfect texture and taste. This was inspired by Jamie Oliver’s version.

Fresh Pineapple

The next difference will be the swap of tinned pineapple rings for fresh pineapple. The bright juicy flavour of the fresh pineapple was no contest. I find the tinned ones a little tasteless and too sweet. By using fresh you are amping up the pineapple vibe immeasurably.

Caramel

Rather than using just brown sugar at the base of my cake tin to encase the pineapple I actually made a very easy caramel and dipped the pineapple in the caramel. I love the plain brown sugar version but it was a little crunchy for my taste and the cake would sometimes fall apart at the edges after it had been turned upside down. The caramel holds everything together perfectly and ensures the cake is always beautifully turned out.

Side view of Pineapple Upside Down Cake

How To Arrange the Pineapple

The way that the pineapple is arranged in a concentric circle looks a little more finickity than pineapple rings but it looks more impressive than it actually is to arrange and also means you get more pineapple for your money on the surface of the cake. I used glacé cherries right in the centre and if you have homemade glacé cherries then all the better.

Gluten-Free Flours

Of course the most significant change from Mum’s original version to this Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake will be in the use of alternative flours. Here we use flours which will give something back to the flavour of the cake, rather than just being used for structure and texture. The main flour is sweet rice flour which binds the cake and gives it moisture and bounce with a delicate taste to give the coconut and pineapple a chance to shine. Next we have sorghum flour to give a tender crumb and lightness to the cake. Then finally a little potato flour to balance out the sweet rice flour so the whole cake doesn’t take on that gumminess that gluten-free cakes are infamous for.

Cut slice of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

Of course the ultimate test for this cake was when I served it up to Mum, the connoisseur of the Pineapple Upside Down Cake. Needless to say she loved it. It’s a bit different but all the better for it and she has requested it for her birthday.

If you make this Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Click here for instant access

PIN THIS POST TO READ LATER!

Overhead of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake with a pineapple and glass of caramel next to it.

Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

This Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake is made with fresh caramelised pineapple and a touch of coconut for tropical flavour.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 50 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: British
Servings: 10 people
Calories: 568kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

Coconut

  • 200 g coconut milk
  • 75 g desiccated coconut

Caramelised Pineapple

  • 1 ripe pineapple
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 50 g unsalted butter cubed
  • 8 glacé cherries

Cake

  • 225 g unsalted butter
  • 175 g caster sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 190 g sweet rice flour
  • 170 g sorghum flour
  • 50 g potato flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

Coconut

  • Pour the coconut milk and the desiccated coconut into a small saucepan and heat until just at boiling point then remove from the heat and leave to cool for 30 minutes.

Caramelised Pineapple

  • Line and grease an 8 inch x 4 inch round baking tin.
  • Trim the top and tail of the pineapple and cut away the skin. Halve the pineapple then remove the core by cutting it out in a ‘v’ shape. Slice the pineapple very thinly lengthways then set aside whilst you make the caramel.
  • Melt the sugar on a gentle heat in a large saucepan, do not stir but gentle shake the saucepan every once in a while to ensure even melting.
  • Add the butter, once it has melted, stir to combine then remove the caramel from the heat.
  • Tip the pineapple slices and the glace cherries into the caramel and stir so everything is evenly coated.
  • Line the bottom of the cake tin with the pineapple slices, overlapping slightly in concentric circles, the rounded side facing towards the sides of the tin. Leave a small gap in the centre of the tin to fill in with the glace cherries.
  • Drizzle the rest of the caramel over the fruit and set aside whilst you make the cake.

Cake

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan assisted oven/gas mark 4.
  • Cream the butter and sugar for a few minutes until light and fluffy.
  • Add the eggs one at a time, mixing until thoroughly incorporated.
  • Pour in the vanilla extract and the coconut mixture and mix in well.
  • Sift together the flours, baking powder and salt then mix into the rest of the ingredients until just combined.
  • Pour the batter into the baking tin, on top of the pineapple and cherries, smoothing the top
  • Bake in the oven for around 55-60 minutes until the sponge has browned on top and an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  • Remove from oven, rest for five minutes then carefully turn out onto a wire rack.

Nutrition

Calories: 568kcal | Carbohydrates: 62g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 33g | Saturated Fat: 22g | Cholesterol: 124mg | Sodium: 212mg | Potassium: 312mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 28g | Vitamin A: 15.6% | Vitamin C: 0.6% | Calcium: 6.4% | Iron: 10.7%

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This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake is an easy cake to assemble last minute. A lightly spiced almond sponge made incredibly festive by its secret ingredient – mincemeat. Drizzled with a quick tipsy Brandy Cream Icing.

Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

It’s not that I don’t like regular Christmas Cake. I’m happy to eat a boozy fruit cake any time of the year. However, I always feel that on top of the Christmas pudding and all the mince pies, a traditional Christmas cake can sometimes be a bit too much.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice on a plate in front

This Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake is my favourite way to keep a Christmas cake in the mix whilst making it a little more accessible and not just something your great aunt is going to enjoy. Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake still has all the right flavours going on so no one is going to feel hard done by. It’s festive with spices, brandy and plump fruits. But as it is primarily a sponge cake and not a fruit cake it’s so much lighter and a bit more modern.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

It’s also incredibly quick to assemble as we’re taking a bit of a shortcut to Christmas by using mincemeat. I will always advocate homemade mincemeat in any recipe where it is required as I think the shop bought stuff is pretty terrible. All sugar and no taste. The good news is that homemade mincemeat is really easy, hopefully you have already made yours otherwise this Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake might be a slightly longer process than you initially believed. At a push, of course you can use the shop bought stuff, the cake will still be delicious.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice taken out

To make the cake even easier to bring together I used a gluten-free plain flour blend, Freee by Doves Farm Gluten Free Plain White Flour 1kg (Pack of 5)” to be exact. You can use any blend but ideally without xanthan gum. By adding an equal amount of gluten-free plain flour and ground almonds we’re ensuring the sponge stays beautifully moist with plenty of fluffiness. The ground almonds add a lovely taste and if you grind your own almonds, which I did here, so it’s more like an almond meal, then the cake will have a pleasantly nubby texture that sits really nicely with the mincemeat. My mincemeat had chopped almonds in already so there is lots of nuttiness going on.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice on a plate in front

The Brandy Cream Icing is gorgeously sweet, creamy and subtle with brandy. However, if you would rather make an icing without the booze then just omit the brandy and add in more milk and a teaspoon of vanilla extract.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice on a plate in front

If you make this Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious creation, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake is an easy cake to assemble last minute. A lightly spiced almond sponge made incredibly festive by its secret ingredient – mincemeat. Drizzled with a quick tipsy Brandy Cream Icing.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 20 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Keyword: almond sponge cake, gluten-free Christmas cake, gluten-free Christmas cake recipe
Servings: 12 people
Calories: 561kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 275 g caster sugar
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 180 g gluten-free plain flour
  • 180 g ground almonds
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • teaspoons mixed spice
  • 280 g mincemeat

Brandy Cream Icing

  • 300 g icing sugar
  • 3-4 tablespoons double cream
  • 3-4 tablespoons brandy

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4.
  • Line and grease a 9 inch round cake tin.
  • Cream the sugar with the butter on a slow to medium speed for about 6 minutes until light and fluffy.
  • Beat the eggs in one at a time, mixing well between additions.
  • Add the vanilla extract.
  • Whisk the flour with the almonds, baking powder and salt in a separate bowl then beat into the rest of the ingredients.
  • Stir in the mincemeat.
  • Pour the batter into the cake tin, smoothing out the surface then bake for 1 hour or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  • Leave for about 5 minutes for the cake to settle then carefully remove from the tin and leave to cool on a wire rack before icing.

Brandy Cream Icing

  • Stir the icing sugar together with the double cream until smooth.
  • Stir in the brandy one tablespoon at a time until the icing has reached a thick dropping consistency.
  • Spoon over the top of the cake nudging it towards the edges so it drips down the sides.

Notes

*I used a suet based mincemeat so there was a bit more fat in the mix. If you are using a non-suet mincemeat perhaps increase the butter by 20g.

Nutrition

Calories: 561kcal | Carbohydrates: 78g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 24g | Saturated Fat: 10g | Cholesterol: 122mg | Sodium: 262mg | Potassium: 84mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 64g | Vitamin A: 11.8% | Calcium: 8.2% | Iron: 8.5%

SHOP THE RECIPE

If you’re a gluten-free baker in the UK then you will be very familiar with Freee by Doves Farm Gluten Free Plain White Flour 1kg (Pack of 5) as it’s pretty much the only gluten-free flour that’s easily accessible for the home baker. For this cake it works really well in combination with ground almonds for a lovely moist cake.

I didn’t have a decent 9 inch cake tin for this recipe so I invested in this PME Anodised Aluminium Round Cake Pan 9 x 4-Inch Deep which is from my favourite range of cake tins. They are wonderful as they have completely straight sides so your cakes will be beautifully neat, the anodised aluminium means the heat disperses evenly throughout the cake without cooking the sides too quickly, which some darker cake tins do. The cakes slip out of the tins easily and they come in all the sizes you would need, I think I may almost have the whole set now.

I love these Kitchen Craft Paul Hollywood 2-Tier Stackable Wire Cooling Rack, 40 x 26 x 35 cm (16″ x 10″ x 14″), don’t be put off that they are part of the Paul Hollywood range as they are actually really useful as they are nice and high which allow more air to get to your cakes to cool quickly. Some cooling racks are too close to the kitchen counter which traps in more moisture as the cakes are cooling down which could lead to a wetter sponge. These are great.

I love these dinky these reindeer cake toppers-  Anniversary House Reindeer Plastic Cake Toppers. Pack of 6. BX164 – so super cute!

and I bought these trees years ago for some Christmas crafts and found they have been more useful ever since decorating my Christmas cakes – Set of 3 Snowy Bristle Xmas Trees for Christmas Cake Decotation

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake {without xanthan gum}

The Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake is made without xanthan gum and is deliciously fluffy, light and moist. It is filled and covered with a dreamy vanilla swiss meringue buttercream and is the cake you will turn to time and time again when you need a simple yet stunning gluten-free cake.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

To say that I am excited about this recipe is an understatement. This is one of the cakes that I am most proud of ever since I began baking gluten-free several years ago.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

The vanilla cake is an especially important cake for any baker as not only should the cake shine in its own right but it is also the building block through which many other cakes can be made. Just change the buttercream to chocolate and you have a perfect chocolate vanilla birthday cake, add some lemon or orange zest to the sponge and buttercream and you have a citrus cake. Add chopped nuts to the batter, chocolate chips or even sprinkles for a funfetti cake. Your basic vanilla cake is where it all starts.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

There is nowhere for the ingredients to hide in a simple vanilla cake. No fancy flavours that may detract from an inferior texture and no cheeky add-ins that make ploughing through a dry cake a satisfying treat. A gluten-free vanilla cake is a strong ask. The sponge has to be light and fluffy but not dry, moist but not claggy and the taste has to sing with the simplicity of vanilla. All of the stumbling blocks of gluten-free baking are put to the test in the vanilla cake and I wanted to prove to the gluten-free cake detractors that cakes baked without wheat can have a beautiful texture, tremendous taste and pleasurable mouthfeel.

Side view of Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

Before I discuss my flour choices for the Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake, it’s important to mention a missing key ingredient that you might be familiar with if you have baked a gluten-free cake before. This gluten-free cake is without xanthan gum which is often used in gluten-free baking to mimic the effects of gluten. I have never found a need to use this omnipresent ingredient, instead relying on careful flour selection to give the desired texture instead. I will be discussing my choice to not bake with xanthan gum in my next post but for now you can breathe a sigh of relief that if you are intolerant to xanthan gum or can’t be bothered to buy yet another ingredient to clog up your shelves you can still enjoy the Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

So without xanthan gum to rely on I have to choose which alternative flours to include wisely. Firstly I was very particular that I didn’t want to make my go-to gluten-free vanilla cake with almond flour so as to avoid any nut allergy issues. I also wanted to produce a cake that used as few flours as possible. This latter point has been the main difference between this gluten-free vanilla cake and my previous go-to gluten-free vanilla cake. It has not been uncommon for me to blend up to five different gluten-free flours to get a taste and texture that I love. For this recipe though I limited myself to just three gluten-free flours for the blend, to make it as accessible as possible, keep costs down and our larder slim.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

So I used my favourite gluten-free flours, the ones I rely on the most and the three gluten-free flours I would recommend as essential ingredients for the impassioned gluten-free baker.

Sweet Rice Flour
Gluten-Free Oat Flour
Tapioca Flour

Now as a disclaimer, these three flours are not going to be suitable for everyone. Oat flour, even gluten-free oat flour, can be a contentious issue for some coeliacs or people with a hardcore gluten intolerance. Tapioca flour also can cause irritability for some and although none of my clients yet has mentioned an issue with sweet rice flour, my goodness I bet some of you readers are shaking your head sadly at its inclusion here. However, these are the flours that work well for me and my intolerance issues and the majority of the gluten-free clients I serve.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

If you would like to learn more about these individual flours and why they work so well in a gluten-free cake and allow the avoidance of xanthan gum then I have written individual posts about sweet rice flour, oat flour and tapioca flour which should hopefully shed some light on their brilliance and usefulness.

In any vanilla cake, gluten-free or not, the quality of your ingredients is absolutely key. Do use the best unsalted butter and whole milk from a local dairy if you can, the freshest eggs from the happiest chickens and the best vanilla extract (not essence) that you can afford. You can taste every ingredient in a vanilla cake. This particular Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake is even more tasty than a wheat version due to the flavourful flours but they enhance the vanilla taste and do not overpower it.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

Finally I have chosen to fill and cover the cake with my absolute favourite Vanilla Swiss Meringue Buttercream. It is light as air, dreamy as a cloud and buttery as hell. If you have never made or tasted swiss meringue buttercream then you will be transported. As soon as I started using swiss meringue buttercream in my early days as a baker my layer cakes suddenly became a superior offering. Despite the need to heat the egg whites with the sugar, using a thermometer as a guide, then whipping them into a meringue before adding your butter one cube at a time, the method sounds more intimidating than the practice. Once you have dabbled in the delights of swiss meringue buttercream then you will never look back.

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table with little boy in background

This recipe for the Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake has taken me some time to perfect, it has been simmering away in the background of my kitchen for a while but now I am so happy to share it with you. This cake is perfectly fluffy, moist and holds together beautifully, giving lovely even slices that do not crumble when it sees a knife.

slices of Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a wooden table

If you make the Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious gluten-free cake creation I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Close up of Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake on a cake stand on a wooden table

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake {without xanthan gum}

The Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake is made without xanthan gum and is deliciously fluffy, light and moist. It is filled and covered with a dreamy vanilla swiss meringue buttercream.
Prep Time1 hr 15 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time2 hrs
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Keyword: best gluten-free vanilla cake, gluten-free vanilla cake, gluten-free vanilla cake recipe
Servings: 12 people
Calories: 882kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake

  • 225 g unsalted butter
  • 400 g caster sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 150 ml whole milk
  • 3 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 160 g sweet rice flour
  • 140 g oat flour
  • 40 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Vanilla Swiss Meringue Buttercream

  • 9 egg whites 270g
  • 450 g caster sugar
  • 540 g unsalted butter at room temperature, cubed
  • a pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake

  • Pre-heat the oven to 160°C/140°C fan assisted oven/gas mark 3/320°F and line and grease 2 x round 8 inch cake tins.
  • Beat together the sugar and butter until pale, light and fluffy.
  • Add the eggs one at a time, beating on a low speed.
  • In a measuring jug whisk together the whole milk and vanilla extract and set aside for a moment.
  • Whisk together the flours, baking powder and sea salt in a large mixing bowl until completely combined.
  • Add the flour mix alternately with the milk, adding the flour in three additions and the milk in two (begin and end with the flour), scrape down the sides of the bowls as needed and mix until just combined.
  • Divide between the cake tins and bake for 45 minutes or until an inserted cocktail stick comes out clean.

Swiss Meringue Buttercream

  • Heat egg whites and caster sugar in a bain marie, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved and the temperature has reached 71°C.
  • Remove the egg whites and sugar from the heat and pour into a stand mixer with whisk attachment. Whisk until the mixture forms stiff peaks.
  • Change the attachment to a paddle attachment. On a low speed add the butter slowly cube by cube. When you have almost added all the butter the mixture will look curdled. Do not fret – this is supposed to happen and just means you are nearly done. Just continue to add all the butter. Once the butter is totally incorporated the frosting will miraculously become a smooth velvety consistency.
  • Add the salt and vanilla extract. Mix until thoroughly combined.

Nutrition

Calories: 882kcal | Carbohydrates: 93g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 54g | Saturated Fat: 33g | Cholesterol: 192mg | Sodium: 170mg | Potassium: 192mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 71g | Vitamin A: 33.9% | Calcium: 6.9% | Iron: 5%

SHOP THE RECIPE

The cake tins I always use are these PME Anodised Aluminium Round Cake Pan 8 x 4-Inch Deep which are wonderful as they have completely straight sides so your cakes will be beautifully neat, the anodised aluminium means the heat disperses evenly throughout the cake without cooking the sides too quickly, which some darker cake tins do. The cakes slip out of the tins easily and they come in all the sizes you would need, although typically I use the 8 inch tins.

I love these Kitchen Craft Paul Hollywood 2-Tier Stackable Wire Cooling Rack, 40 x 26 x 35 cm (16″ x 10″ x 14″), don’t be put off that they are part of the Paul Hollywood range as they are actually really useful as they are nice and high which allow more air to get to your cakes to cool quickly. Some cooling racks are too close to the kitchen counter which traps in more moisture as the cakes are cooling down which could lead to a wetter sponge. These are great.

You need to use a double boiler or bain marie to make the swiss meringue buttercream and this KitchenCraft Induction-Safe Stainless Steel Double Boiler Porringer/Bain-Marie Pan, 16 cm (6.5″) is perfect. Double boilers are way more useful than you think they are going to be. I use one every time I melt chocolate, make a curd, butter sauce or indeed swiss meringue.

For checking the temperature of your egg white sugar syrup when making your swiss meringue buttercream don’t be without a Classic SuperFast Thermapen 3 professional food thermometer in grey colour It gives quick and accurate temperature readings meaning you can don’t have to guess at any temperatures when making candy, caramel or fancy buttercreams. I use mine all the time.

If you want to replicate the flower and leaf design on this cake then I used the Wilton 489785 Decorating Tip-No. 125cr Large Flower Petal for the leaves.

And the Ateco Extra Large Stainless Steel closed Star 848 Pastry Piping Cream Icing Tube Nozzle for the flowers.

I find these huge disposable piping bags are the most robust ones you can buy, I do get a huge pack of them as the worst thing is to get ready to ice your cake and discover you don’t have any piping bags left. I use disposable as I bake a lot of cakes and find washing up the re-usable piping bags takes a lot of time and I can never get them totally clean. I use these piping bags for everything from cupcakes to drizzling melted chocolate to piping a straight level of buttercream evenly over a whole layer cake. This 1 Roll of Savoy Disposable Piping Bags – 100 21 Bags by Cn-Ice is an absolutely invaluable piece of kit in my baking.

It’s not easy to buy certified gluten-free sweet rice flour in the UK, for some reason Bob’s Red Mill is astronomically expensive. However I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

Oat flour can be picked up at most health food shops and if I run out that’s where I head to. However, like all alternative flours it can be expensive so I find the most economical way is to buy it online. I go through bags of the stuff as it’s the flour I use most regularly so I like to buy in bulk. My favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4) at a reasonable price. Even better if you go the subscribe and save option.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

Some of the links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy anything using the links then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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text saying Gluten-Free Flours: how to start gluten-free baking, which flours to use and how to convert wheat recipes: fromthelarder.co.uk

Salted Caramel Chocolate Espresso Cake {gluten-free}

This gluten-free Salted Caramel Chocolate Espresso Cake is one of my favourite cakes from the cake stall. A chocolate lover’s sponge sandwiched together with silky salted caramel swiss meringue buttercream and drizzled with thick luscious salted caramel.

Raspberry Matcha Cake {gluten-free}

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Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

This Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake knocks socks off its peers. It is light, fluffy and flavourful but incredibly moist and topped with a richly whipped cream cheese buttercream.

Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

I hadn’t made a Red Velvet Cake in ages and before I revisited the recipe with Cole earlier this week I wasn’t intending it to be my next blog post. But I had forgotten how much I love this classic cake and actually I think I prefer this version with alternative flours to any I have made before. And I have baked a lot of Red Velvets. The flavour here is richer, thanks to the oat flour, without any compromise on texture and moisture balance, thanks to the white flour and tapioca flour. I didn’t think it was possible but I have become super excited about Red Velvet Cake once more. It’s like 2005 all over again.

The first time I tried a Red Velvet Cake was when the Hummingbird Bakery first opened its doors in Notting Hill and the production company I was with had ordered dozens of this incredibly trendy cupcake to celebrate the end of a project we had been slogging away at. The cupcake revolution was at its humble beginnings and American baking was just starting to make headway in the UK. We ate a lot of cake in our office, well I did anyway, the hours were long, the work was challenging and the clients were frustrating. A little bit of cake to see in 4pm was my beacon of light during the day. However, this particular cupcake, the colour, the texture, the buttercream, is seared into my memory. I remember with clarity the speech given by our Head of Production, how the cakes were arranged on the table and who I giggled with about sneaking my third cupcake. It’s really akin to my baking origin story. I wasn’t so much hit with a bolt of lightning or bitten by a radioactive spider but ate my first bite of red velvet cake and my love of baking which had been lying dormant whilst I pursued a demanding career in production was reawakened.

Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

Red Velvet Cake was the first cake I completely obsessed over. I trekked across London religiously to The Hummingbird Bakery to have yet another red velvet. I scoured cookbooks for recipes and when I discovered food blogs I followed all the baking bloggers I could find, consumed by the world of cake which had suddenly opened up. As soon as the Hummingbird Bakery published its first cookbook I put in my pre-order and when it arrived I thrillingly re-created its Red Velvet Cupcakes time and time again for friends, family and work colleagues. Over time I adapted the cake to suit my evolving tastes and when I launched my first cake stall my layered Red Velvet Cake was one of my best-sellers. It sold out consistently as customers were lured in by its tantalising colour and then would then return next week for its amazing flavour.

Gradually as I offered a greater variety of cakes, focusing on new and interesting flavours, I didn’t make as many Red Velvets. By then you could buy them almost anywhere and they weren’t nearly as interesting a showpiece. Customers didn’t order them as much and then after I re-launched the cake stall as a gluten-free extravaganza, well the Red Velvet Cake just hasn’t made an appearance. This has been a huge mistake I now realise.

Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

Last Wednesday my mum and I took Cole and Beau for cake and babyccinos at a little local café after our toddler gym class. Now Cole is pretty taken with the colour red. I mean, he really likes it. The tantrums we encounter at Diddidance if there isn’t a red ribbon or hula hoop left when it gets to Cole’s turn is intense. His wellies are red, most of his clothes are now red, his sunglasses, hat, water bottle, toy dinosaurs, Nana’s new car. It’s all red red red.

So when we went entered the cafe he spotted the red velvet cake at the front of the glass display instantaneously. ‘Red cake,’ he squealed excitedly. He had never had red velvet cake before so I treated him to a slice, looking forward to having an illicit bite myself. Now I know I’m a complete cake snob, I have hugely high standards, but this cake was dire. Actually I should have known better, it didn’t look great, the colour was muted, the buttercream yellowing and the whole thing was covered in cling film, but I figured Cole isn’t terribly fussy. However it was horrible. So terribly stale, hard at the edges, with a heavy taste of oil and little else, plus I was now deeply concerned about the health of the buttercream. How long it has been languishing on display was anyone’s guess. So unfortunately for Cole the cake was whisked away (cue horrific screams) and I promised him we would make a much better red cake that afternoon.

Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

Well we did, I never break a cake promise. But as I said above I had really forgotten just how amazing a really good Red Velvet Cake can be. Even with Cole lending a hand to the proceedings the results were outstanding. It was my first time making this cake gluten-free and it lost absolutely nothing in the translation. The crumb is soft and tender from the buttermilk and vinegar combination and the cocoa flavour just peeks through with the vanilla giving you a cake which is best of both worlds, a little bit chocolatey and a little bit vanillary.

The cream cheese buttercream is my go-to recipe, it’s not too sweet and really rich and creamy. The secret is the pinch of salt and the vanilla extract which bring out all the flavour. I can often give or take buttercream but not this one, I’m all in on this cream cheese buttercream and it sets off the red velvet cake so well.

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With a Red Velvet Cake it’s all about the colour. I love a beautifully rich red, not too garish. The beauty of the cake being gluten-free is that you can’t overmix it when the flours are added so wait until the batter is completely ready before adding your colour then you can ensure the exact shade you want. If the colour isn’t rich enough for you then just add more. I have erred against giving you directions on how much colour to add below as it completely depends on the brand you use. I like using Squires Kitchen Professional Poinsettia Food Colour Pastes as they don’t add any extra moisture to the cake. The shade I used here is Poinsettia, 1-2 teaspoons.

Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

My cake stall is on hiatus at the moment but I’m really looking forward to returning and putting Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake back on the map. In the meantime you can guess which cake Cole will be requesting every single time we have baking afternoon from now on.

Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

UPDATE!! I’ve had a lot of requests from readers asking how to adapt the cake into a layer cake as below. If you are interested in the recipe then I have created a PDF with everything you need to know.

Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake

This Gluten-Free Red Velvet Cake knocks socks off its peers. It is light, fluffy and flavourful but incredibly moist and topped with a richly whipped cream cheese buttercream.
Prep Time45 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 45 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: gluten-free red velvet cake, gluten-free red velvet cake recipe
Servings: 16 slices
Calories: 591kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 500 g caster sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • red food colouring
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 50 g cocoa powder
  • 225 g white rice flour
  • 175 g oat flour
  • 100 g tapioca flour
  • 2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
  • 400 ml buttermilk
  • tablespoons white vinegar

Cream Cheese Buttercream:

  • 250 g unsalted butter
  • 300 g icing sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 180 g cream cheese

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 170°C and line and grease a 13”x 9” deep cake tin.
  • Beat the butter and caster sugar together for a few minutes until light and fluffy.
  • Add the eggs one at a time and beat well.
  • Sift together the cocoa powder, flour and bicarbonate of soda in a bowl and set aside for a moment.
  • Mix together the buttermilk and vinegar in a jug.
  • In alternate turns add the flour and the buttermilk mixtures to the rest of the batter. You should add the flour in 3 additions and the buttermilk in 2 additions, starting and ending with the flour.
  • Add the food colouring and vanilla extract and mix until the colour is as desired
  • Pour into the cake tin and bake for 60 minutes or until an inserted cocktail stick comes out clean.
  • Remove from the oven then rest the cake for 10 minutes before carefully removing to finish cooling onto a wire rack. Once completely cooled, cut a very thin slice of the sponge away and whizz up to cake crumbs in the food processor for sprinkling on the top.

Cream Cheese Buttercream:

  • Cream the butter until soft then add the icing sugar and mix for about 10 minutes until very light and fluffy.
  • Add the salt and vanilla and mix again to combine.
  • Finally beat in the cream cheese until the buttercream is smooth. Swirl onto the finished cake with a palette knife.

Notes

*how much red food colouring you use is completely dependent on the brand. Be careful using a very liquid food colouring (like Dr Oetker which is the default red food colouring you can get at most UK supermarkets) as it will affect the consistency of the batter. I love to use Squires Kitchen Professional Food Colour Pastes in my baking as they give excellent deep rich colours and don’t affect the recipe at all.
*If you don’t have any buttercream to hand then you can make your own if you whisk together 400ml whole milk with 2 tablespoon white vinegar and let stand for 10 minutes before using. To this you can then add the 1½ tablespoons of white vinegar that the recipe requires.

Nutrition

Calories: 591kcal | Carbohydrates: 77g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 30g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Cholesterol: 116mg | Sodium: 239mg | Potassium: 170mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 51g | Vitamin A: 19.1% | Calcium: 6.4% | Iron: 6.9%

SHOP THE RECIPE

For the rice flour I used Freee by Doves Farm Gluten Free Rice Flour 1kg (Pack of 5) which is very easy to get hold of and can be found in most major supermarkets in the gluten-free aisle.

Oat flour can be picked up at most health food shops and if I run out that’s where I head to. However, like all alternative flours it can be expensive so I find the most economical way is to buy it online. I go through bags of the stuff as it’s the flour I use most regularly so I like to buy in bulk. My favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4) at a reasonable price. Even better if you go the subscribe and save option.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

The cake tin I use for all my tray bakes and sheet cakes is the KitchenCraft Chicago Metallic Professional Non-Stick Baking and Roasting Tin, 33 x 23 cm (13″ x 9″) which I love because it’s robust and easy to clean.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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