Gluten-Free Shepherd’s Pie

Gluten-Free Shepherd’s Pie is a deeply flavourful homely recipe with a rich gravy, plenty of vegetables and a crisp buttery potato topping.

A baking dish of Gluten-Free Shepherd's Pie with a portion removed. A bowl of Shepherd's Pie and a bowl of mint sauce to the side

Welcome to the first in a new series featuring classic dinner recipes which have been de-glutened. A lot of traditional British recipes, especially the ones we grew up eating as a family rely at least somewhat on the presence of flour. Whether it’s the gravy on your Sunday roast, the béchamel sauce of your lasagne or even my Auntie Lil’s chicken curry, regular plain flour is always present in some way. Since becoming gluten-free many years ago I have learnt through trial and error the best way to continue making these recipes so there is no difference between the gluten-free versions and the ones from my childhood. First up on the agenda is one of our all-time classic family faves. Shepherd’s Pie.

A baking dish of Gluten-Free Shepherd’s Pie

What’s the difference between Shepherd’s Pie and Cottage Pie?

Both dishes refer to a red meat dish, often minced meat, cooked in a gravy with onions and often carrots and celery, topped with a mashed potato layer and baked in the oven. The term Cottage Pie was first mentioned in 1791 but Shepherd’s Pie did not really appear until 1854. Initially the two terms were interchangeable for the same dish but in the 20th century the two recipes were separated into their own identities. Cottage Pie became synonymous with versions made with minced beef whereas Shepherd’s Pie would more commonly be made with minced lamb.

Our family adores Shepherd’s Pie, it meets approval from all members including the baby and guarantees a clean plate from our picky pre-schooler. Luke and I love it too, especially served with hot buttered cabbage.

Shepherd’s Pie is a simple and satisfying meal with lots of veggies in the main base of the pie along with the lamb mince. I love the taste and texture that the extra vegetables give to the base of the dish. The usual onions are present, along with carrots and celery. However, here we also include diced courgette as it goes so beautifully with the lamb.

A baking dish of Gluten-Free Shepherd's Pie with a portion removed. A bowl of Shepherd's Pie and a bowl of mint sauce to the side

How do you make Gluten-Free Shepherd’s Pie?

The traditional version of Shepherd’s Pie is made using plain wheat flour to thicken the rich gravy which encases the meat and vegetables at the base of the pie. Here we are switching it out for sweet rice flour. The sticky properties of this starchy flour absorb the cooking oil and the added stock for a beautifully smooth and silky sauce which is indistinguishable from wheat flour gravy. The only difference is the colour. The sweet rice flour gravy is much lighter than its wheat counterpart. To this end we add coconut aminos which deepens the colour of the gravy naturally whilst also providing the perfect amount of seasoning.

One of the other key ingredients in this Gluten-Free Shepherd’s Pie is the use of fresh stock to make the most umami empowered gravy. It makes all the difference, providing tremendous depth of flavour and I would seriously advise against the stock cube if possible. I make homemade chicken stock every other Sunday with the bones of our Roast Chicken so I always have it to hand for my everyday cooking. It is possibly the most invaluable ingredient in my kitchen. If you don’t have any homemade stock then check to see if your butcher supplies it, otherwise do use the best store bought fresh stock you can find.

A bowl of Gluten-Free Shepherds Pie

Finally do you want to know my secret ingredient for Shepherd’s Pie? It’s definitely not something I would add to Cottage Pie, but it lifts the whole meal up a notch, giving it such a special flavour. Would you like to know? It’s mint sauce! Once you try it you will never make your Shepherd’s Pie without it.

Mint sauce is traditionally served as part of the Great British roast dinner alongside spring lamb. It’s an essential condiment of our larder and is an absolutely perfect addition to our Shepherd’s Pie. The three main ingredients of mint sauce are mint, white wine vinegar and sugar so it’s pretty easy to make your own. However, I usually use shop bought. It’s worth checking the label of your mint sauce though as many contain xanthan gum which is something I try to steer clear of in my kitchen. There are brands without though, so just double check.

A Shepherd’s Pie wouldn’t be the same without delicious buttery mash blanketing the whole affair. I am quite particular about my mashed potato and although I don’t go the whole Joel Robuchon route which is half potato/half butter, this recipe certainly does not skimp on the butter or the seasoning. A good amount of butter is necessary for the perfectly crisp golden top on your Shepherd’s Pie. However I also add a splash of stock in the mash to make the potatoes smooth, creamy and rich. You could also use milk. When adding your butter and liquid to the cooked potatoes it’s imperative to warm them up first and tip your potatoes into the add-ins, not the other way around. We want to avoid gluey or lumpy mash at all costs and this way makes sure we achieve neither. To mash the potatoes you can use a hand masher or a potato ricer, but never use the food processor or the blender as you’ll run the risk again of gluey mash. Potatoes can be decidedly tricky when they want to be.

An empty bowl of Gluten-Free Shepherd's Pie

If you make this Gluten-Free Shepherd’s Pie then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

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A baking dish of Gluten-Free Shepherd's Pie with a portion removed. A bowl of Shepherd's Pie and a bowl of mint sauce to the side

Print Recipe
Gluten-Free Shepherd's Pie
Gluten-Free Shepherd’s Pie is a deeply flavourful homely recipe with a rich gravy, plenty of vegetables and a crisp buttery potato topping.
A baking dish of Gluten-Free Shepherd's Pie with a portion removed. A bowl of Shepherd's Pie and a bowl of mint sauce to the side
Course Main Dish, pie
Cuisine British
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 800 g red potatoes peeled and quartered
  • 100 g unsalted butter
  • 100 ml fresh stock I use chicken
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion peeled and finely diced
  • 2 carrots peeled and finely diced
  • 2 celery sticks finely diced
  • 1 courgette finely diced
  • 600 g lamb mince
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 3 tablespoons sweet rice flour
  • 200 ml fresh stock I use chicken
  • 1 tablespoon coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon mint sauce
  • ½ teaspoon cracked black pepper
Course Main Dish, pie
Cuisine British
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 800 g red potatoes peeled and quartered
  • 100 g unsalted butter
  • 100 ml fresh stock I use chicken
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion peeled and finely diced
  • 2 carrots peeled and finely diced
  • 2 celery sticks finely diced
  • 1 courgette finely diced
  • 600 g lamb mince
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 3 tablespoons sweet rice flour
  • 200 ml fresh stock I use chicken
  • 1 tablespoon coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon mint sauce
  • ½ teaspoon cracked black pepper
A baking dish of Gluten-Free Shepherd's Pie with a portion removed. A bowl of Shepherd's Pie and a bowl of mint sauce to the side
Instructions
  1. Boil a large saucepan of water and add the potatoes. Cook for 20 minutes or until the potatoes break apart when you touch them with the tip of a knife. Drain the potatoes from the water.
  2. Add the butter, stock, salt and pepper to the now empty saucepan and heat gently until the butter has melted. Remove from the heat.
  3. Tip the cooked potatoes back into the saucepan and mash well until the potatoes are creamy. Set aside whilst you prepare the lamb mince.
  4. Pre-heat the oven to 200 °C/180°C fan assisted/gas mark 5.
  5. Heat the olive oil in a wide bottomed saucepan then add the onion, carrots, celery and courgette. Cook for about 10 minutes until the vegetables have softened.
  6. Add the lamb mince, bay and thyme leaves, stirring occasionally until the lamb has browned.
  7. Add the sweet rice flour to the pan, mixing in well to absorb the fat. If there is any excess oil then remove it with a spoon.
  8. Pour in the stock and stir until a thick gravy has formed.
  9. Add the coconut aminos and mint sauce, stirring through. Cook for 5-10 minutes so all the flavours are well combined.
  10. Remove the lamb mince from the heat then spoon into an ovenproof baking dish into an even layer.
  11. Spoon the mashed potato over the top until it completely covers the lamb mince, then create light furrows in the potato by using the back of a fork.
  12. Bake in the oven for 25-30 minutes until the potato is golden.

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Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce {gluten-free}

This Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce is a delightful alternative take on the Christmas Pudding. Still rich with fruit and spices but imbued with velvety pools of chocolate and the sharp sweetness of clementines.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

I hate to break it to you but this weekend is the last Sunday before advent. There is no denying it any more, Christmas will soon be upon us and in no time we’ll be scrabbling around on Christmas Eve desperately trying to wrap up all the stocking presents, brine the turkey and wrestle the children into bed.

Amid the present and meal prep chaos there is definitely one job you don’t want to be doing on Christmas Eve and that’s making a Christmas Pudding. Let’s face it if you haven’t made it by then it’s more than likely you’ll be swinging by Tesco before it closes hoping they haven’t sold out of all the gluten-free ones. There’s nothing like a homemade Christmas Pudding though. That’s why it’s best to get ahead and tradition decrees that the fifth sunday before Christmas is the ideal day for such a job. It’s Stir-Up Sunday people!

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

Stir-Up Sunday harkens way back to Victorian times and gets its name from the opening of the book of common prayer which is read on the last Sunday before advent ‘Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people’ It seems that the Victorians took the bible at its word and it soon became tradition to stir up your Christmas Pudding on that day too. And with good reason, it’s such a good idea to get it out of the way early doors. After its initial steam a Christmas Pudding can sit quite happily for weeks or even months and even tastes better the longer you leave it.

Christmas Pudding evokes such childhood nostalgia for me that a generous portion at Christmas is more than a delicious dessert, it’s like a transportation device to my past. I loved the Christmas Pudding our Auntie Lil always used to make us but I also have a fondness for the one we were served every year at school.

Christmas time at our school was magical. The whole school would sit at tables in the main dining hall, an ancient and creaking cavernous room, all wooden beams and pillars with a balcony high above surrounding the room where the older years would sit. Just after the Christmas Pudding was served the lights would be turned off so we were in pitch darkness. The room would fall silent, all 700 children, and a beautiful choral echo would be heard faintly from outside. As the singing grew stronger, our choral society would hover into the room, shrouded in capes, holding candles and singing haunting Latin carols. The memory of Christmas Pudding drowning in brandy sauce still in our mouths. Perhaps if we were lucky a faint metallic taste might be on our tongues as well which meant that we had been one of the hallowed few to have found a penny wrapped in foil in our serving. To be treasured indeed.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

My recipe for Traditional Christmas Pudding is usually the one I turn to every year and although I will never tire of it I fancied a change. So this Christmas I will be making this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce and I could not be more excited to share it with my family, it’s utterly delicious.

What I love about this recipe that even though this pudding is beautifully chocolately it is still most definitely Christmas Pudding and the flavours marry together so well. The teff flour, which is the gluten-free flour I chose for this recipe works so beautifully in support of the chocolate. There is so much texture in this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding, the molton puddles of chocolate chips give the pudding a softness, the dried fruit give a lovely chew with a final nobbly crunch from the nuts. And despite all the rich flavours going on, this Christmas Pudding is lighter than you think, it’s not stodgy at all. As long as you don’t let it sit after it has finished steaming and serve straightaway.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

The Cointreau Sauce is a nod to the brandy sauce we were always served at school and actually I think this may be my favourite accompaniment to the pudding. It’s adapted from a Delia Smith recipe for her Brandy Sauce and it is light and simple. The gentle flavour of the Cointreau Sauce lets the pudding speak for itself whilst providing the much needed sauce and a spicy after kick of Cointreau.

Also a little bit of advice on this recipe, I know we’re all about Stir-Up Sunday but since this recipe takes a couple of days to make you will probably want to start prepping on the Saturday. Stir-Up Saturday if you will. This means you can do the final bit of work and the big steam on the Sunday rather than the job bleeding into your working week.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

If you do fancy ringing in the changes with your Christmas pudding this year then I urge you to give this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce a go, and if you do then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you use this recipe as a jumping off point for your own twist on the Christmas pud then I’d also love it if you’d share your version and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce {gluten-free}
This Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce is a delightful alternative take on the Christmas Pudding
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours total
Servings
10 people
Ingredients
Day One
  • 115 g sultanas
  • 115 g currants
  • 100 g dried cranberries
  • 20 g mixed peel
  • 40 g whole almonds chopped up
  • 1 grated bramley apple about 250g
  • juice and zest 2 clementines + 1 extra for decoration
  • 50 ml Cointreau
Day 2
  • 2 eggs
  • 80 g fresh shredded suet*
  • 125 g chocolate chips
  • 115 g light muscovado sugar
  • 80 g gluten-free breadcrumbs
  • 80 g teff flour
  • 20 g tapioca flour
  • 25 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
Cointreau Sauce
  • 40 g butter
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 40 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 2 tablespoons Cointreau
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours total
Servings
10 people
Ingredients
Day One
  • 115 g sultanas
  • 115 g currants
  • 100 g dried cranberries
  • 20 g mixed peel
  • 40 g whole almonds chopped up
  • 1 grated bramley apple about 250g
  • juice and zest 2 clementines + 1 extra for decoration
  • 50 ml Cointreau
Day 2
  • 2 eggs
  • 80 g fresh shredded suet*
  • 125 g chocolate chips
  • 115 g light muscovado sugar
  • 80 g gluten-free breadcrumbs
  • 80 g teff flour
  • 20 g tapioca flour
  • 25 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
Cointreau Sauce
  • 40 g butter
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 40 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 2 tablespoons Cointreau
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce
Instructions
  1. Mix everything from the Day 1 list of ingredients together in a large mixing bowl. Cover with cling film and leave to marinate overnight.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients from Day 2 and stir together really well.
  3. Butter a pudding basin, and slice the extra clementine, tucking the slices into the bottom of the basin.
  4. Fill the pudding basin with the pudding mixture then prepare the basin for the steam.
  5. Take a piece of greaseproof paper and lie a piece of foil on top, make a fold in the centre of both pieces which allows for more room for the steam to rise. Place these over the top of the pudding basin, with the foil on top, securing with string around the pudding. Trim off any excess paper and foil, you don't want them to hanging too low as otherwise they will soak up the water during the steam.
  6. Place a wire rack (or a folded up tea towel) into a large lidded pot, deep enough to cover the pudding. Then place the pudding on top of the rack.
  7. Fill the pot up with boiling water until halfway up the pudding. The water should not touch the greaseproof paper or foil otherwise they will soak it up and the pudding will go soggy. Place the lid on the pot and turn the heat on so the water is kept at a simmer.
  8. Steam for four hours, checking the water level occasionally and topping up if necessary.
  9. Remove the pudding from its pot then leave to cool. Once cool re-wrap the pudding in fresh greaseproof paper and foil and store in a cool dark place until Christmas Day.
  10. On Christmas Day the puddings will need a final steam before serving so repeat steps 6 and 7. However your pudding will only need two hours this time.
  11. Turn your pudding out onto a plate and serve with the Cointreau sauce.
Cointreau Sauce
  1. Melt the butter in a large saucepan then add the sweet rice flour.
  2. Pour in the milk gradually and bring the sauce up to a gentle boil. Add the sugar and continue cooking for about 10 minutes.
  3. Pour in the cream and bring the sauce to a low simmer.
  4. Finally turn off heat and add the Cointreau. Serve hot with the Christmas pudding.
Recipe Notes

*It’s just not possible to buy gluten-free pre-packaged suet so do speak to your local butcher about obtaining fresh suet. It will come in a solid block which you will need to grate with a bit of gluten-free flour so that it can evenly disperse throughout the mincemeat.

Cointreau Sauce adapted from Delia Smith's Brandy Sauce

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I always use Callebaut Chocolate Dark 70.5 Percent Easi-Melt Buttons Callets 2.5 Kg in all my chocolate recipes. It comes in a big old bag but if you bake a lot then these chocolate pellets are simply delicious and so good to bake with.

There are a few brands of lovely teff flour that I like to use but for this Christmas Pudding I used yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Brown Teff Flour 1kg. It has a lovely taste and soft texture.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

I love my Cornishware Blue and White Stripe Pudding Basin 1.1L 40oz which I use for all my steamed puddings, it’s so beautiful and sturdy and is about to really come into its own as I make my Christmas Pudding in the next couple of weeks.

Bakers twine is super useful in baking and for securing your foil lid to your steamed puddings. I use Tenn Well 200m 3Ply Bakers Twine, Kitchen Cotton Twine Food Safe Cooking String Perfect for Trussing and Tying Poultry Meat Making Sausage DIY Crafts and Decoration (White)

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Gluten-Free Mince Pies

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

These simple Gluten-Free Mince Pies are made with the most flavourful sorghum and almond flour pastry and filled with Easy Homemade Mincemeat.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I waxed lyrical earlier on in the week regarding my love affair with mincemeat and all the different and festive ways you can incorporate this treasure into your baking. However, it may not have gone unnoticed that I haven’t actually posted any actual mince pie recipes on the blog. Like ever. Until now.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

To be honest most of the drama regarding making your own mince pies is around the mincemeat and once you have that under your belt then you just need to encase it in pastry. Yes, there are many routes you can go down with your mince pies, open topped, double-crusted, frangipane, brandy butter topped, orange icing. The list is endless. But there is plenty of time to get into all of that once you have mastered the pastry itself. Since I’m a gluten-free blog then I am all about the gluten-free pastry and I’ve been saving this glorious homemade gluten-free pastry recipe until exactly the right time. In my mind there is no better time than mince pie season (aka Christmas)!

This gluten-free pastry is actually just as easy to make as regular wheat pastry. The only difference is that it is slightly more fragile to handle so may need a little more care when rolling out. It also requires a couple of minutes extra to blend together your gluten-free flour mix so you can ensure your pastry has the right bind, flakiness and snap.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I can’t deny that this gluten-free pastry tastes absolutely incredible. I tested the recipe by making some plain pastry shells and they were so moreish, like tasty little biscuits. As in most of my gluten-free recipes the alternative flours pack in so much flavour. This pastry is more than just a vessel for holding your mincemeat, it has its own character and flavour profile to enhance your mince pies.

The majority flour used in this gluten-free pastry recipe is sweet rice flour which is needed to bind the ingredients together and add elasticity to the mix so that the pastry can be rolled out with ease. It has a near neutral taste so its role is mostly function. The flavour of the pastry can be sourced via the other two flours in the mix, sorghum and almond flour. The sorghum flour is incredibly tasty, think wholewheat flour, earthy and wholesome. The almond flour adds a mild nutty sweetness and both of these are a great match for the rich mincemeat. The fourth ingredient in the flour blend is ground flaxseeds which helps to further bind the pastry and also adds a nice bit of texture.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

Once these four ingredients are whisked together then you can pretty much continue the same way you would as regular pastry. I use the butter cold from the fridge, sliced as thinly as possible then rubbed with the flours to make rough shreds and add flakiness to your dough. Caster sugar is added for sweetness. Then 2 eggs and an extra yolk for richness. Bring your dough quickly together, with maybe a little ice cold milk if more liquid is needed to make the pastry cohesive. Then wrap your ball of pastry in cling film and keep in the fridge until needed. The pastry can keep up to 3 days, just bring it out 30 minutes to 1 hour (depending on how warm your kitchen is) before you would like to roll it out.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I have several mince pie tins but typically they have all been put into storage along with a bunch of my baking gear whilst we’re umming and ahhing about moving house. I had a mini meltdown when I realised this, which was obviously after I had cut out all my pastry rounds and the oven had been pre-heated and I was basically ready to go. However it turns out that a 12 hole regular muffin tin makes the perfect sized four-bite mince pies just as well. Your pastry rounds will only go halfway up the tin but this works out just fine. So you mustn’t despair if you don’t have a special tin for your gluten-free mince pies.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I filled my Gluten-Free Mince Pies with the most delicious Easy Mincemeat this time round. If you fancy being a little bit daring with your mince pies then have a look at my Victorian Mincemeat which is inspired by traditional mince pies and uses actual beef mince along with the dried fruit, spices and brandy. That mincemeat is something special. You can’t taste that it is actually meat, it is just ultra flavourful with a wonderfully luxurious texture. If you want to go in the other direction entirely then my nut-free and vegetarian Cranberry Cointreau Mincemeat is glorious and is a family favourite. So vibrant, light and still incredibly festive. Your mince pies, your choice.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

If you need a Gluten-Free Mince Pie recipe then you must give these a go, they are simply wonderful, and if you do then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you use this recipe as a jumping off point for your own mince pies then I’d also love it if you’d share your version and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Gluten-Free Mince Pies
These simple Gluten-Free Mince Pies are made with the most flavourful sorghum and almond flour pastry and filled with Easy Homemade Mincemeat.
Gluten-Free Mince Pies
Course christmas
Cuisine British
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
18 double-crusted pies
Ingredients
  • 140 g sweet rice flour plus extra flour for dusting
  • 125 g sorghum flour
  • 75 g almond flour
  • 25 g ground flaxseeds
  • 125 g unsalted butter directly from the fridge
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs + 1 yolk lightly beaten
  • pinch of salt
  • 1-2 tablespoons whole milk very cold
  • 300 g mincemeat
  • 1 teaspoon egg yolk + 1whole milk whisked together for the wash
Course christmas
Cuisine British
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
18 double-crusted pies
Ingredients
  • 140 g sweet rice flour plus extra flour for dusting
  • 125 g sorghum flour
  • 75 g almond flour
  • 25 g ground flaxseeds
  • 125 g unsalted butter directly from the fridge
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs + 1 yolk lightly beaten
  • pinch of salt
  • 1-2 tablespoons whole milk very cold
  • 300 g mincemeat
  • 1 teaspoon egg yolk + 1whole milk whisked together for the wash
Gluten-Free Mince Pies
Instructions
Making the pastry
  1. In a large mixing bowl whisk together the sweet rice flour, sorghum flour, almond flour and chia seeds.
  2. Slice the butter very thinly and add to the flour. Then rub the mixture between fingertips until roughly shorn and crumbly.
  3. Whisk in the caster sugar and then pour in the eggs.
  4. Bring the dough together using a wooden spoon at first if you like and then your hands. If the dough is still too dry and crumbly then add a little extra whole milk.
  5. Turn the pastry out on to the work surface and knead very briefly into a ball until the dough is cohesive and slightly sticky.
  6. Wrap the pastry dough in cling film and place in the fridge for at least 30 minutes (or up to 3 days) until you are ready to make your mince pies.
Making the mince pies
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C.
  2. To make the mince pies, dust your work top and your rolling pin with extra sweet rice flour then roll your pastry out to 3mm thickness. The pastry will be quite fragile. I usually split the dough in half and roll out half at a time to save a lot of re-rolling.
  3. Cut your pastry using an 8cm pastry cutter and place each round carefully in the hole of a 12 hole muffin tin. The pastry will come up about halfway. Fill each mince pie with a heaped teaspoon of mincemeat. If you want double crusted mince pies then cut out further 6cm rounds for the lid and tuck on top so the edges of the pastry all meet.
  4. If you would like to decorate the top of the mince pies then cut out extra Christmassy shapes from the pastry and place on top.
  5. Whisk the extra egg yolk and milk to make a wash then brush over the top of each mince pie. Place in the oven and bake the mince pies for 10 minutes until they are golden. Leave in the tin for 5 minutes to rest then carefully remove each mince pie from the tin with a palette knife and place on a wire rack to cool. Wash and dry the tin then make your next batch.
  6. Store the mince pies in a metal tin. They keep quite well for up to 5 days but they are best on the day they are made.
Recipe Notes

SHOP THE RECIPE

The 12 hole muffin tin I always use and will thoroughly recommend due to its durability and ease of washing is the MasterClass 12-Hole Non-Stick Cupcake Tray / Baking Pan, 35 x 27 cm

I use these KitchenCraft Double-Edged Plastic Biscuit / Pastry Cutters with Storage Box (Set of 7) – White for cutting out my mince pies, scones, biscuits. Anything really. These are basic and great. Plus they can go in the dishwasher.

For brushing the egg wash on the mince pies I recommend using a silicone pastry brush. I use Zeal Silicone Pastry Basting Brush Cream, 20 cm and absolutely love it. It goes in the dishwasher and is so easy to clean plus doesn’t clump together like some bristle pastry brushes do. I also use it for basting my turkey and lots of other christmassy and baking jobs. Infact you might need more than one.

I do insist that you store your mince pies in not just any cake tin but one that is ultra christmassy. I love these Eddingtons Nordic Christmas Cake Tins Set of 3. They may only come out once a year but they make any kitchen super festive.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Gluten-Free Gravy

This Gluten-Free Gravy is deliciously smooth, rich and full of flavour. Here are all the tips and tricks to get it just right.

Gluten-Free Gravy

My mother and father both made good gravy. It was an absolutely essential recipe in our household growing up because of the importance of our Sunday Lunch. Thick juicy rich brown gravy flavoured with fresh garden herbs would cook for hours on the hob over the course of the day. It was always the last element to be placed steaming hot onto the dinner table. Two magnificent gravy boats stood proudly at either end to be poured liberally over our roast beef and Yorkshire puddings.

Ours was not a household for thin wispy gravy made delicately from drizzled juices. Our gravy was the crowning glory of the meal and did double duty as it provided the ultimate treat when our meat and veggies were done. My father would return to the kitchen to grab a loaf of thick farmhouse bread and cut huge slices for each of us to place on our dinner plates. We would then soak the bread in any leftover gravy, with perhaps an extra slug of mint sauce, wait until the bread was deliciously soppy before devouring greedily. It was a ritual and it didn’t matter how stuffed you were after lunch, the bread and gravy was a must and the bit we most looked forward to and tried to save room for.

The importance of our Sunday lunch has not wavered into my adulthood and since I became gluten-free it has been of utmost importance to me to achieve a triumphant gravy that would pacify the whole family. I don’t do the bread and gravy thing with my family, which is a huge loss really. However, I can’t help but sneak back into the kitchen on the odd occasion, when all the plates have been cleared, and help myself to just one more Yorkshire pudding dragged through the gravy pan for that last little treat when no one else is watching.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How to make gravy with drippings

If you want to make proper actual traditional gravy then your only choice is to use the pan drippings from your roasted meat. There are two ways of doing this. You can either make a quick gravy at the end of your meal whilst your meat is resting or if you don’t want your gravy to be a last minute rush and you want to get really good flavour then you could plan ahead. We make a Sunday Lunch every week and on the odd occasion that I don’t make a traditional gravy I will save my drippings and keep them in little pots in the freezer, alongside my homemade stock. I have a whole compartment dedicated to fat and stock. So when I need to make a gravy I always have drippings to hand, plus it means I can make my gravy ahead. This is especially useful at Christmas as I can make my gravy a couple of days before. Also making gravy ahead of time really allows the flavours to develop and gives a better sauce.

TIP: To make sure you achieve a good quantity of drippings (enough to help you out with your Yorkshire puddings and gravy) I pour a generous amount of olive oil over my joint or bird before roasting. The more olive oil means the more meat flavoured fat at the end of the roast.

How do I make gravy without meat drippings?

It’s easy. Maybe your meat didn’t produce very much or maybe you are making a veggie gravy. If you don’t have drippings or not enough then sub in some unsalted butter or ghee instead. For vegans, use vegan butter.

What can I use to thicken gluten-free gravy?

When I first became gluten-free and tried making gravy using a generic gluten-free flour I was disappointed, thinking that I would never again be able to enjoy gravy the same way. This gravy was thin and granular and lacked lustre. After a lot of experimentation I found the best flour to use is sweet rice flour. Sweet rice flour is absolutely essential to make a beautifully smooth velvety gluten-free roux and produce a sauce with a silky mouthfeel. It absorbs moisture very well so doesn’t clump and so is even easier to use than wheat flour. The flavour is pretty neutral with an ever so slightly sweet vibe which lends itself to the gravy perfectly.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How do you make gravy browner and richer?

In order to achieve a lustrous rich dark brown colour to gravy traditionally you would cook your flour and butter low and slow before adding the liquid so that the roux darkens to give flavour and colour to your gravy. However, sweet rice flour needs handling a little differently and I wouldn’t recommend this direction. Instead you can either use coconut aminos to lend its colour to the proceedings which works excellently, but you need a fair bit so you might need to check your seasonings. Or you can use the onion method as below.

Cook the onion in the drippings or butter for about 20 minutes until they are just starting to brown, but not at all burnt. Then when you add your sweet rice flour followed by the stock they take on this rich brown colour from the onions. It also gives your gravy further depth of flavour. You strain off your gravy at the end so you won’t get bits of onion in your gravy.

How do you make gravy without homemade stock?

So there are occasions when you just don’t have homemade chicken or vegetable stock to hand. At this point you have two options, you can either use fresh stock from the butcher or the supermarket but I find these tend to be a little bland or oversalted so go carefully with them. The other direction is to use whole milk. Yes, this does create a completely different beast but one that is worth experimenting with if you are caught out at short notice. This gravy is obviously creamier and richer but absolutely delicious. If I’m going down this latter route then I might also add a few garlic granules to help with the flavour. If you are dairy-free or vegan then you can also substitute with almond milk which I have done on many an occasion and it works just as well.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How do you add flavour to gravy?

If you are using the drippings from the meat and homemade stock then most of your gravy flavour begins right there. However, to help it along, or if you are subbing ingredients, do add a couple of bay leaves, some fresh thyme or even some rosemary to liven up the flavours. The gravy will also need a little sweetness to balance things out. You could use a glug of white wine or masala which makes for a very sophisticated gravy. However I like to use a bit of fruit jelly. Any good jelly works well here. Redcurrant jelly is easy to find at the supermarket and can usually be found with the condiments (not with the jams and preserves) or cranberry jelly which is lovely at Thanksgiving or Christmas.

How do you re-heat gravy?

Gravy thickens the longer it stands so if you are re-heating then it’s best to do on the hob in a saucepan and whisk in a little extra liquid (stock or just water would be fine).

It turns out that making good gluten-free gravy is easy peasy, especially if you have sweet rice flour in your arsenal. Many of the other ingredients can be subbed or played with depending on what you have to hand or the different dietary needs of your guests. The lovely thing about gravy is that it always tastes slightly different every time but always delicious. Go on, sneak back into the kitchen for that extra Yorkshire pud and gravy treat.

Gluten-Free Gravy

Print Recipe
Gluten-Free Gravy
This Gluten-Free Gravy is deliciously smooth, rich and full of flavour. Here are all the tips and tricks to get it just right.
Gluten-Free Gravy
Course sauce
Cuisine British
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 50 g unsalted butter or drippings from roasted meat
  • 1 onion chopped very finely
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 800 ml chicken stock preferably homemade
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon redcurrant jelly* or apple jelly or cranberry jelly
Course sauce
Cuisine British
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 50 g unsalted butter or drippings from roasted meat
  • 1 onion chopped very finely
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 800 ml chicken stock preferably homemade
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon redcurrant jelly* or apple jelly or cranberry jelly
Gluten-Free Gravy
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter or dripping, then add the diced onion and heat on medium for about 20 minutes until they are starting to turn brown (but definitely not burnt).
  2. Add all the flour and mix with a wooden spoon until the fat has absorbed all the flour.
  3. Pour in about a quarter of the stock, then switch to using a whisk, stirring all the time to smooth out the lumps. Once the gravy is beginning to thicken then pour the rest of the stock in slowly, whisking all the while.
  4. Add the bay leaf, thyme and stir in the redcurrant jelly, bringing the gravy up to a gentle boil. If the gravy is too thick for you, add some more stock or just water to get to your desired consistency.
  5. Simmer for 15 minutes then remove from the heat and strain. Keep warm until ready to serve.

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overhead shot of Gluten-Free Cauliflower Cheese in a serving dish with a spoon on a wooden board with plates

Gluten-Free Gravy

Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings

These are the best Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings. Majestically tall and crisp with a fluffy breaded interior making them absolutely ideal for mopping up the gravy after your Sunday Roast.

Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings

Nothing beats a roast dinner. Every Sunday without fail when I was a child my Dad would make us a lavish Sunday Roast. He was a wonderful cook. The table would be properly set, the meat resplendent in the centre as a vast array of beautifully prepared vegetables, crisp and fluffy roast potatoes, onion sauce, gravy and Yorkshire puddings would surround this magnificent offering. These Sunday lunches were incredibly important to us as a family and I remember them vividly.

Perhaps in my early twenties my Sunday Lunches were a bit more sporadic and mostly consumed hungover at our local pub. But as soon as Luke and I moved in together to become our own family unit then without fail every week we made a Sunday lunch together. Now we’re a family of four and our Sunday lunches are as important as ever. Luke works too late to eat with the family during the week so it’s one of the few times we can sit together and all eat the same meal as a family. Even when I’m at the market stall and don’t finish until 3 or 4pm we’ll rush home and bung a joint in the oven so we can scrape together a simplified Roast Dinner before the children’s bedtime.

Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings

Of course Yorkshire Puddings are traditionally served with roast beef but you are missing a trick if that is the only time you will eat them. We love our yorkshires and back in the day Dad would happily make them from scratch every week to serve with the beef or chicken or lamb or pork. And I do the same today. Even our festive table would not be complete without Yorkshire Puddings served alongside our turkey.

After I became gluten-free I stopped making Yorkshire Puddings to go with our Sunday lunch, I just didn’t think you could make them the same, in much the same way that I was unconvinced about gluten-free cakes.

Over the years I’ve been experimenting though and the time I was finally able to make a complete gluten-free Sunday Lunch without skimping on any of the trimmings, including gravy, Yorkshires, stuffing and cauliflower cheese without anyone noticing any difference I could rejoice.

Good Yorkshire Puddings should be sky high, crisp on the outside with a beautiful fluffy interior so you can use them to mop up your gravy when the rest of your meal is complete.
It’s taken me a bit longer to perfect my Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings, we were pretty much eating glorified pancakes that stuck resolutely to the baking tin for the best part of the last two years. In the last few weeks though I set myself a challenge to get them perfect. Oh my golly gosh have I succeeded. It is no word of a lie that these Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings are not only the best gluten-free Yorkshire puddings you will ever eat but the best Yorkshires full stop.

Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings

Too often you can have regular wheat Yorkshire puddings and the chef will rely too much on the size and height. Guys, it’s not the size that counts yada yada yada. A crisp Yorkshire that is all tall golden shell without the bready interior is a pointless affair. It’s like serving up a pie with no filling. These Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings are beautifully tall without showing off but the perfectly baked chewy fluffy substance of the puddings is their real crowning glory.

I love gluten-free flours and I don’t care who knows. The key to these Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings is in the gluten-free flour mix. I don’t normally pair sweet rice flour with regular white rice flour as I thought they would squabble but now I see that they are perfectly compatible. Sweet rice flour adds the chew, the sticky bind of the pudding. The white rice flour is beautifully neutral with the sweet rice counteracting its more grainy drying qualities. And the potato flour is necessary to draw the moisture out of the sweet rice flour and adding the crisping element which gives our puddings their wonderful initial crunch.

So that the Yorkshires don’t stick to the muffin tin you must grease it really well, both in the holes and on the surface of the tin. I use spray grease, the same kind I use with my baking. Then you must put ½ teaspoon of good fat in the bottom of each hole. Your best choice will be the dripping of whatever meat you are roasting, but if you are making the puddings to serve along something other than a roast dinner or you are a veggie, then use a fat with a high smoking point instead. I use ghee and it works incredibly well.

Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings

I don’t bother really resting the batter, I haven’t found it makes enough difference for it to be worthwhile, the Yorkshire Puddings are just as scrummy baked straightaway after making. So as long as you have all the right ingredients then really there is only one final tip you need to adhere to and you will see it in every single Yorkshire recipe around. You must put the greased tin in the oven at a high temperature for at least 10 minutes for the fat to really sizzle. As soon as you pour your batter into the hot fat it needs to start cooking immediately. This will give your puddings their essential rise.

If you are making to serve alongside a roast meat, then I suggest as soon as your meat is ready, turn up the oven to the right temperature and you can cook your Yorkshires in the twenty minute resting period of the meat. It will all work out perfectly.

I urge you to give these Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings a try, they are so easy and delicious. If you do make these Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious creation, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings
Print Recipe
Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings
These are the best Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings. Majestically tall and crisp with a fluffy breaded interior making them absolutely ideal for mopping up the gravy after your Sunday Roast.
Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings
Course side dish
Cuisine British
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
12
Ingredients
  • 300 ml whole milk
  • 4 eggs
  • 100 g sweet rice flour
  • 100 g white rice flour
  • 50 g potato flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons ghee or dripping from your roast meat
Course side dish
Cuisine British
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
12
Ingredients
  • 300 ml whole milk
  • 4 eggs
  • 100 g sweet rice flour
  • 100 g white rice flour
  • 50 g potato flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons ghee or dripping from your roast meat
Gluten-Free Yorkshire Puddings
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 220°C fan assist/200°C/gas mark 7.
  2. Completely grease a 12 hole muffin tin with spray oil if you have it. Then drop in either ½ teaspoon ghee into the bottom of each hole or some of the dripping from your roast meat.
  3. Place the tin in the oven and heat for 10 minutes.
  4. In a jug whisk together the milk and eggs until smooth. Set aside for a moment.
  5. In a large mixing bowl whisk together the flours and salt then make a little well in the centre of the flours and pour in the milk and eggs whisking all the time until the batter is smooth.
  6. Pour the pudding batter into a jug for easy pouring. Then remove the muffin tin from the oven and straightaway pour the batter almost to the top of each hole.
  7. Place the tin back into the oven and cook for 20 minutes.
  8. The Yorkshire puddings should be crisp and have risen gallantly. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from Jane Grigson’s Yorkshire pudding which I made for years before becoming gluten-free. Can’t believe I’m saying this but I actually prefer this GF version (sorry Jane!)

SHOP THE RECIPE

The 12 hole muffin tin I always use and will thoroughly recommend due to its durability and ease of washing is the MasterClass 12-Hole Non-Stick Cupcake Tray / Baking Pan, 35 x 27 cm

To grease your muffin tin well I recommend using professional cake release spray. It doesn’t matter how little or often you bake, you will be so glad to have this little shortcut around. I use Dubor PR100 Professional Cake Release Spray 600 ml it lasts longer and doesn’t dry out like some of the cheaper brands. Really worth your time and money this one.

I really got into using ghee in my Whole30 and my favourite brand has been  Ghee Easy Organic Ghee, 850 g. It has a high smoking point so doesn’t burn like butter and makes your Yorkshire Puddings taste scrummy.

It’s not easy to buy certified gluten-free sweet rice flour in the UK, for some reason Bob’s Red Mill is astronomically expensive. However I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

You want to use potato flour and not potato starch in this cake, they are different ingredients and do different things so make sure you are using the right one. I use Wholefood Earth Organic Potato Flour, 1 kg which is a lovely fine flour.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars {gluten-free}

‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars are so deliciously thick and chocolatey with a gluten-free rolled oat base and an ooey gooey fudgey filling of homemade nutella.

A stack of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

I’ve got a bit of exciting news to impart. I’m finally bouncing back from maternity leave and returning to the cake stall next month. Sunday 6th October to be exact, at Stroud Green Market, which is my neighbourhood farmers’ market. I have decided to stay local and stick to the one market for the moment to ease me back into the game. Plus I love the vibe at Stroud Green Market, it is run with a lot of passion with a lovely community feel. I will be selling the usual layer cakes, loaf cakes, bars and delectable goodies which are all totally gluten-free and incredibly delicious.

overhead of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

For the foreseeable future I’ve chosen to not focus on jams, chutneys and other preserves which does disappoint me, but something had to give, besides my sanity. I still look after Cole and Beau for the majority of my week and I haven’t been preserving anything this year whist I’ve adjusted to two little souls to juggle. Although I expect I’ll have a few jars of something moving towards Christmas like my mincemeats or cranberry sauce. I’m very excited to be getting back to proper work and I cannot wait to dive back in.

Even though I have been on maternity leave from the market stall I’ve obviously been just as busy on the blog as ever which has been a great excuse for developing new recipes for the stall. Lately it’s been a recurring theme that I have also been trying to revamp some old recipes which didn’t get as much love as they should the first time round and updating the ingredients and sometimes method to create gluten-free versions. Didja know this blog is all about the gluten-free these days?

overhead of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

These ‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars are a brilliant case in point. I posted the original recipe back in 2014 with some slapdash photos I took when I sold them on one of my first cake stalls. I’ve taken a couple of new photos but I’ve also amended the recipe to make it gluten-free and (whisper) remove the Nutella. There’s something about the ingredients list in Nutella that I’m not quite on board with these days, all that palm oil and sugar doesn’t sound very appealing. But the good news is this version is so much better with a more intense chocolate and hazelnut flavour. Homemade Nutella is pretty darn spesh and here I’ve used a natural hazelnut butter, melted dark chocolate, cocoa powder and a smattering of brown sugar to make the most amazing filling for these oat bars imaginable. The evaporated milk added in at the end is what transforms this incredibly chocolately nut butter into creamy gooey fudge. The rolled oat biscuit crust which holds it together is buttery and crumbly and studded with chocolate chips on the top, because if I can add more chocolate to a recipe then I will.

overhead of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

I’m really looking forward to introducing these 2018 versions of the ‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars to the cake stall. They represent the fully flavoured bakes I love to produce with the best quality gluten-free ingredients. If you live in London or are visiting for the weekend then I’ll be at Stroud Green Market every Sunday from the 6th October and I’d love to see you. I’ll be the one surrounded by a lot of cake.

A stack of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

Print Recipe
'Nutella' Fudge Oat Bars {gluten-free}
‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars are so deliciously thick and chocolatey with a gluten-free rolled oat base and an ooey gooey fudgey filling of homemade nutella.
Course cake
Cuisine British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Servings
15 bars
Ingredients
  • 100 g sweet white rice flour
  • 40 g tapioca flour
  • 240 g gluten-free rolled oats
  • 100 g hazelnuts roughly chopped
  • 240 g unsalted butter room temperature
  • 185 g soft light brown sugar sifted
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 180 g hazelnut butter
  • 100 g dark chocolate
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons soft light brown sugar
  • 75 ml evaporated milk
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 50 g dark chocolate chips
Course cake
Cuisine British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Servings
15 bars
Ingredients
  • 100 g sweet white rice flour
  • 40 g tapioca flour
  • 240 g gluten-free rolled oats
  • 100 g hazelnuts roughly chopped
  • 240 g unsalted butter room temperature
  • 185 g soft light brown sugar sifted
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 180 g hazelnut butter
  • 100 g dark chocolate
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons soft light brown sugar
  • 75 ml evaporated milk
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 50 g dark chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 160°C and grease an 8 inch square baking tin.
  2. Whisk the sweet rice flour and tapioca flour together until combined.
  3. Add the oats, hazelnuts, butter, sugar, baking powder and salt and rub together with your hands until everything has come together to form a light dough.
  4. Press ½ the dough into the base of the baking tin to form an even layer.
  5. Melt the chocolate, hazelnut butter, cocoa powder and evaporated milk together in a double boiler, mixing together until thoroughly combined.
  6. Spread the ‘nutella’ chocolate mixture on top of the first layer of dough.
  7. Add the chocolate chips to the rest of the dough then crumble the dough on the top and press down lightly into the chocolate, don’t worry too much about it spreading out evenly.
  8. Bake in the oven for 35 minutes until the top is golden brown.
  9. Remove from the oven and leave to cool for an hour or so before removing from the tin. Leave to cool completely on a wire rack before cutting into bars.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I have had this KitchenCraft MasterClass Non-Stick Deep Square Cake Tin with Loose Base, 20 cm (8″) for years and it’s always served me really well. It has a loose base so it’s really easy to remove these oat bars from.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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