Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake {gluten-free}

Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake is a beautifully flavoured and textured cake. Sweet potato and cream cheese are baked into the butterscotchy sponge whilst ripples of buttery cinnamon swirl through the centre. A generous pouring of thick maple cream cheese icing makes this cake one of the best of the season.

overhead shot of slices of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes

Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake is the recipe which I get the most requests for. A cheeky email from a friend here, a sly DM popping up from a customer there. And I’m always willing to oblige, this cake needs to be made, eaten and loved at any given opportunity. It’s also the cake I choose to accompany me anytime I volunteer to bring a sweet and it always goes down a storm. I have regular customers that return to the cake stall time and time again, making the trip across London, just for this Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake. Believe me, it’s well worth the trouble. Even though I don’t restrict this cake to the cooler months since it seems to receive love all year round, Autumn is when the rich flavours of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl truly shine.

straight on shot of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes in the foreground

This Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake began life as a wheat cake a few years ago on the stall, it quickly became a customer favourite and when I made the switch to gluten-free I immediately began working to convert this recipe. When I was finally happy with the finished cake I was not the only one to remark upon how much more flavourful and exciting the cake was in comparison to its wheaty mirror image. For this bad boy, it’s all about the oat flour.

overhead shot of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes

Oat flour is one of those gluten-free flours that not all wheat intolerant folks can handle, so tread carefully here if you are making it for someone else who is gluten-free. It’s possible to buy gluten-free oat flour but if you can’t find it at your local health food shop or supermarket then you can grind your own gluten-free oats. For more detailed info on oat flour and grinding your own, see my post here. For those of us lucky ducks that are able to enjoy gluten-free oats to our hearts and tummies content then oat flour is a wonder, and especially shines in this cake. It’s rich toasted butterscotch undertones compliment the savouriness of the sweet potato, tang of the cream cheese and warmth of the cinnamon. I haven’t tasted another cake like this one.

straight on shot of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes in the foreground

I would never normally sweeten my sweet potatoes when eaten as a savoury dish, instead I choose to boost the natural starches present by roasting the vegetable in wedges so the sugars are encouraged to the surface to create gloriously sticky caramelised edges. When I was in Alabama a few years ago though I ordered mashed sweet potatoes as a side and was astounded by the heavy sugar added into this already very sweet ingredient to accompany my fillet steak. I hesitate to say I didn’t like it, but at the risk of offending a whole lot of Americans, I really didn’t. If I’m going to sweeten my sweet potatoes then I think I prefer them as a dessert. Sweet Potato Pie, for instance, yummy. Or in this divine Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffle Torte. And in this Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake the sweet potatoes find another extremely comfortable home.

straight on shot of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes in the foreground

In order to achieve the sweet potato puree which is needed for the cake you need to bake whole sweet potatoes wrapped in foil for 1 hour at an oven set to 180°C. They are ready when you press gently into them and your finger squishes into the potato. Leave them to cool before unwrapping from the foil and their loosened skins. They should be so soft that you can just mash them with a fork.

overhead shot of slices of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes

Another slightly unusual ingredient in this cake is the maple extract used in the maple cream cheese icing. I first came across maple extract in a recipe by The Pioneer Woman for her famous cinnamon rolls where she insists that it should not be substituted for maple syrup. So when I first made cinnamon rolls I complied to the letter of instruction. I have to say it does make all the difference. If you were to use maple syrup you would have to use a fair amount to really get the flavour of maple into your icing which then distorts the liquid ratio in the recipe and adds too much sweetness when you are already using icing sugar. The maple extract imbues the icing with its beautifully rich flavour without any of the former problems. It’s not easy to buy in shops but I use this Cupcake World Intense Food Flavouring Maple 100 ml from Amazon and it works brilliantly.

overhead shot of slices of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes

Something else which might surprise you in this recipe is the use of black pepper. I love using freshly ground black peppercorns in some of my bakes as it adds a deep rich spice note. It doesn’t interfere with any of the flavours but just enhances the background kick. The baking process also removes its heat so don’t worry if you don’t like things too spicy.

overhead shot of slice of Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake on a plate with a sifter and sweet potatoes

I urge you to give this Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake a try, it’s really one of my favourites and a cake I will never tire of baking or eating. If you do make this Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious gluten-free cake creation, say maybe swapping out the sweet potato for pumpkin, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake {gluten-free}
Sweet Potato Cinnamon Swirl Cake is deeply flavourful with butterscotch undertones rippled with buttery cinnamon and drizzled with maple cream cheese icing.
Course cake
Cuisine British
Keyword cake
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Servings
10-12 people
Ingredients
  • 170 g sweet rice flour
  • 170 g oat flour
  • 35 g potato flour
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 245 g sweet potato puree* about 3 sweet potatoes
  • 245 g cream cheese
  • teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 200 g caster sugar
  • 200 g light soft brown sugar
  • 225 g butter melted
  • 3 eggs
Cinnamon Swirl
  • 15 g butter melted
  • 30 g light brown sugar
  • 40 g icing sugar
  • 15 ml whole milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Maple Cream Cheese icing
  • 200 g icing sugar
  • 30 g salted butter at room temperature
  • 80 g cream cheese
  • 1 tablespoons whole milk
  • ½ teaspoon maple extract/flavouring
Course cake
Cuisine British
Keyword cake
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Servings
10-12 people
Ingredients
  • 170 g sweet rice flour
  • 170 g oat flour
  • 35 g potato flour
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 245 g sweet potato puree* about 3 sweet potatoes
  • 245 g cream cheese
  • teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 200 g caster sugar
  • 200 g light soft brown sugar
  • 225 g butter melted
  • 3 eggs
Cinnamon Swirl
  • 15 g butter melted
  • 30 g light brown sugar
  • 40 g icing sugar
  • 15 ml whole milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Maple Cream Cheese icing
  • 200 g icing sugar
  • 30 g salted butter at room temperature
  • 80 g cream cheese
  • 1 tablespoons whole milk
  • ½ teaspoon maple extract/flavouring
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 170°C and grease and flour a 10 inch bundt tin.
  2. First of all prepare the cinnamon swirl by mixing all the ingredients together in a small bowl and then set aside.
  3. For the cake, sift together, in a large bowl, the flours, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder, salt and pepper, then set aside.
  4. In another bowl beat together the sweet potato, cream cheese and vanilla extract. Again, set aside.
  5. Beat the sugars and butter together in a food mixer until well incorporated.
  6. Add in the eggs one at a time until the batter is smooth.
  7. Finally spoon in 1/3 of the flour, beat into the batter then add 1/3 of the sweet potato mixture and beat in. Repeat until all the flour and the sweet potato mixture has been incorporated into the batter.
  8. Spoon 1/3 of the batter into the prepared bundt tin and smooth down. Dot half of the cinnamon swirl mixture in and swirl with a cocktail stick.
  9. Spoon the next 1/3 of the batter and repeat with the cinnamon swirl.
  10. Spoon the rest of the batter in, smoothing the surface.
  11. Bake for about 50 minutes.
  12. Remove from the oven, rest for five minutes and then carefully remove the cake from the bundt tin. Cool completely on a wire rack then drizzle with the maple cream cheese icing.
  13. Finally spinkle some extra cinnamon over the top of the cake.
  14. For the maple cream cheese icing beat the icing sugar together with the salted butter and cream cheese until smooth.
  15. Then add the whole milk and maple extract and beat until combined.
  16. Drizzle over the top of the cake.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I saved up for an age to get this Nordicware Heritage Bundt Pan. It’s absolutely my favourite cake tin. I love the clean crisp edges of the swirl and how you can drizzle the icing right on in there and in this cake it makes me think of snowy mountain peaks. I recommend greasing and flouring this tin so that your cake has no problems popping out. The quality of the tin is excellent but it can be pricey. I have noticed that the price really fluctuates on Amazon- so wait until it’s around £40 before you choose to buy.

To grease your bundt tin well I recommend using professional cake release spray. It doesn’t matter how little or often you bake, you will be so glad to have this little shortcut around, there’s nothing worse than messing around with butter or oil on your fingertips to get the grease evenly into all the crevices of the cake tin. I use Dubor PR100 Professional Cake Release Spray 600 ml it lasts longer and doesn’t dry out like some of the cheaper brands. Really worth your time and money this one.

It’s not easy to buy certified gluten-free sweet rice flour in the UK, for some reason Bob’s Red Mill is astronomically expensive. However I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

Oat flour can be picked up at most health food shops and if I run out that’s where I head to. However, like all alternative flours it can be expensive so I find the most economical way is to buy it online. I go through bags of the stuff as it’s the flour I use most regularly so I like to buy in bulk. My favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4) at a reasonable price. Even better if you go the subscribe and save option.

You want to use potato flour and not potato starch in this cake, they are different ingredients and do different things so make sure you are using the right one. I use Wholefood Earth Organic Potato Flour, 1 kg which is a lovely fine flour.

I do try and stick to natural ingredients and flavourings in my cakes but if the need calls for it then I can be persuaded otherwise, which is where this Cupcake World Intense Food Flavouring Maple 100 ml comes into play. I only use the smallest drop in the icing as a little goes a very long way, so we’re really not doing any harm here and it’s really worth the difference rather than using actual maple syrup, the flavour is true and intense.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffle Torte

Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffle Torte

Gluten-Free Flour: Oat Flour

Text saying Guide to Gluten-Free Flours: Oat Flour: What is it and How should we use it. fromthelarder.co.uk. In front of an image of some oats and oat flour

Vanilla Almond Cake with Lemon Curd Glaze {gluten-free}

Vanilla Almond Cake with Lemon Curd Glaze {gluten-free}

Whisky Marmalade Bundt {gluten-free}

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Pumpkin Jam

Pumpkin Jam makes the most out of squash season, lusciously smooth, rich with savoury pumpkin notes and scented lightly with vanilla and nutmeg for a comforting Autumn preserve.

overhead shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins

This year, due to being on maternity leave, I have completely taken a break from producing any preserves for the market stall. I return to the market stall next weekend and know I am going to seriously regret this decision as my stall won’t look as plump or lively without the mountains of jars interspersed between all the cake. Plus I really love selling the preserves.

overhead shot of pumpkins

The best part about making the jams, chutneys, ketchups and sauces for the stall is coming up with really fun and unexpected flavours which are always so delicious and fun to talk about with my customers. Plus it’s the one area of my business that Luke gets really involved in so it is something we can do together. He is just as passionate as me about the ingredients and loves to help me source them. As a family we adore foraging and a lot of my jams are either made from produce foraged locally in North London or from local producers, usually from our friends at the market. Luke gave me the inspiration to develop this recipe for Pumpkin Jam last year when my jam stock was dwindling. I make my jams in very small batches so once it’s gone, it’s gone until the next year and with new seasons comes new flavours.

The farmers market at this time of year always has an abundance of pumpkin and mixed squash and as soon as he had given me the idea to look outside the confines of fruit I couldn’t wait to try out Autumn’s bounty. Obviously the Pumpkin Jam was hugely successful or I wouldn’t be sharing the recipe with you today. It’s one of the few preserves that I have made for personal use this year as I just couldn’t let squash season pass us by without a few jars of Pumpkin Jam to keep us going.

side on shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins

Like all jam, its uses shouldn’t just stop at toast and crumpets. I use jam mostly for filling a Victoria Sponge or as an accompaniment to cheese. Believe me, this pumpkin jam goes particularly well with a mature cheddar. Try jam smeared onto your pork chops or chicken breasts before grilling or as a sweetener in sauces.

Although I have to confess that I didn’t just stop at pumpkin in this jam. Instead I used a variety of mixed squash which imbues the jam with many levels of flavour. I decided against adding cinnamon to this Pumpkin Jam. Sacrilege I know. I literally had to hold my hand back from automatically picking up the cinnamon jar. But I’m glad I did as the cinnamon would have interfered too much with the deep notes of the pumpkin. To compliment the squash I added just a hint of vanilla and nutmeg which turned out to be exactly the right thing to do.

overhead shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins

Time will tell whether I’ll be able to bring the preserves back next year but in the meantime I probably won’t be able to resist making my gorgeous mincemeats and cranberry sauce for Christmas. However, until I decide exactly what I’m going to do about the preserves on the stall moving forward, at least I’ll have my own personal Pumpkin Jam for company.

Print Recipe
Pumpkin Jam
Pumpkin Jam is lusciously smooth, rich with savoury pumpkin notes and scented lightly with vanilla and nutmeg for a comforting Autumn preserve.
overhead shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins
Course jam
Cuisine British
Keyword pumpkin
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
8 180ml jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg fresh pumpkin puree*
  • 1 kg jam sugar
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 vanilla bean seeds scraped out
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
Course jam
Cuisine British
Keyword pumpkin
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
8 180ml jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg fresh pumpkin puree*
  • 1 kg jam sugar
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 vanilla bean seeds scraped out
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
overhead shot of pumpkin jam with a spoon in it surrounded by pumpkins
Instructions
  1. Pour the pumpkin puree into a large preserving pan. Turn onto a gentle heat and begin to warm the puree, stirring to avoid burning on the bottom of the pan.
  2. Once the puree has heated up then pour in the jam sugar, orange juice, lemon juice, salt, vanilla bean seeds and nutmeg.
  3. Stir everything together and turn up the heat to dissolve the sugar.
  4. Bring to a rolling boil, making sure to stir the bottom of the pan frequently so the jam doesn’t stick. It should take 5-10 minutes from then to reach setting point.
  5. Once the jam reaches 104°C or passes the saucer wrinkle test* then decant into sterilised jars*.
Recipe Notes

*You can use just pumpkin puree or a variety of mixed squash to reach 1kg

*The saucer wrinkle test basically requires you to put about 5 saucers in your freezer when you begin making your jam. Once you think the jam might be ready then you can double check by removing a saucer from the freezer, dropping a teaspoon of jam on it then placing the saucer in the fridge. After about 30 seconds remove the saucer and push the jam with your finger. If it wrinkles up it’s ready, if it just pools back into the space your finger has left then it needs more bubbling time. Boil it a bit longer, then test again with another saucer.

*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.

SHOP THE RECIPE

You don’t need much equipment for jam making but there are a few bits and pieces I rely upon.

My favourite way to make my small batch jams is in my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue. It’s very heavy duty but I use it for absolutely everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.

A jam funnel is essential and I use this cheap and cheerful KitchenCraft Home Made Stainless Steel Jam Funnel

You will soon wonder how you got by without using jam jar tongs which means you can pick up piping hot jars confidently. I love these Kilner Jam Jar Sterilising Tongs, Steel, Silver/Red, 6 x 10 x 24 cm

This post is not sponsored but the links above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to click through to buy then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Seedless Wild Blackberry Lime Jam

A jar of Wild Blackberry Lime Jam with a spoon in it and the ingredients surrounding

Baked Apple Butter

Baked Apple Butter is the perfect hybrid between a jam and a chutney. The apples are stewed in cider, brandy, honey and spices then smoothed and baked slowly in a low oven for the most intensely thick and rich apple sauce that is the ultimate Autumn preserve.

Pear and Cobnut Jam

Pear and Cobnut Jam

Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn

Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn is the perfect balance of butter, sweet and salt that you need which makes this popcorn totally addictive. With a deep caramel and smoky umami flavour you need look no further for movie night.

Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn in a saucepan on a table

I can count on one hand the number of movies I have seen this year. That’s a sad state of affairs considering I studied film at university and always assumed that is the field in which I would be working throughout my adult life. Oh, and by the way I’m not counting animated films. I think I have seen How To Train Your Dragon at least 60 times, Robin Hood maybe 100, Cars 50 times and Frozen 20 times (it’s not one of Cole’s favourites).

So my career in film fizzled out during my twenties but these days I now don’t watch them at all which my teenage self would have found staggering. I also don’t read film reviews anymore so I’ve no idea what is even on at the cinema. I actually was a film reviewer in a previous life so this really makes me sad.

overhead shot of Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn in a saucepan on a table with maple syrup and bacon salt

One of the problems I have is the kind of films I will actually watch has narrowed considerably since having children, or maybe just getting older. Horror, gritty realism or anything traumatic or weepy are gonzo. I also have no capacity for concentration these days so anything with a complicated or thought provoking plot is also out. That basically leaves comedy or action, as long as it’s not stupid or with too many guns. Romance I can do though. Bring on the romance. As long as one of them doesn’t die at the end.

Then there’s a timing issue. I only really get to sit down in the evenings around nine, I’m usually working on my laptop for an hour and then I need to go to bed for ten otherwise the night time feeds are too overwhelming. So there isn’t really much time to actually sit down and watch a film from beginning to end.

But since I’m always striving to do better I would really like to get this in check. For the sake of teenage me. I miss getting lost in a film, the journey and escapism of them, and then chatting about them afterwards. So Luke and I have instigated movie nights. Saturday nights we work extra hard to get the children asleep on time so that we can be sat on the sofa by 8pm, house tidied, food eaten and work set aside so we can watch a film together.

A mixing bowl of Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn with a wooden spoon

So far we have seen Jumanji and Pitch Perfect 3. I know, we may have set a very high bar choosing films with such worthy artistic merits. Will any other film we watch from this moment on measure up? Only time will tell. This weekend we are contemplating Deadpool 2 so we’re certainly not shying away from the highest of highbrow fare. To be honest I was ridiculously excited the first time we sat down to watch something that it didn’t matter what it was, it felt like such a treat. In particular as you know what goes hand in hand with movie nights.

Popcorn!!

There are certain foods in this house which I leave to Luke and they simply cannot be made without his presence. Cocktails are completely his domain. His cheese and onion toasties rule. Oven baked chips he has absolutely mastered. And his popcorn cannot be beaten. If you have tried my Perfectly Sweet n’ Salty Popcorn (which he kinda helped invent) then you know that we take our popcorn very seriously in this house. The ratio of butter to sweet to salt has to be absolutely spot on. This is what makes perfect popcorn so addictive. Your hand should take on a life of its own and dive into the bowl of its own volition. Before you know it you are licking the butter off your fingers and wondering where it all disappeared to.

Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn in a saucepan on a table with maple syrup and bacon salt

Well, this Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn takes its cues from my classic recipe and takes it into the stratosphere. The butter is still there as before, tasting divine, the sugar has been replaced though with maple syrup for even more depth of flavour and the salt has been surpassed by my favourite seasoning of all time. Bacon Salt. Bacon Salt makes everything taste better, salty but with a smoky savoury umami flavour. Bacon Salt is very easy to make and will last an age in the fridge. Once you give into its temptation you will be adding Bacon Salt to everything. Trust me.

Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn is definitely the only popcorn we will need to accompany our movie night from now on. It even tastes as good the next day, if you dare to leave any in the bowl, as it becomes even more toffee like. Totally dangerous.

Oh, and if you have any recommendations for films that have been released in the past three years I would love to hear them so we can add to our movie night roster. One day you never know, we might even be able to return to the actual cinema. A girl can dream.

overhead shot of Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn in a saucepan on a table

If you make Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn
Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn is the perfect balance of butter, sweet and salt with a deep caramel and smoky umami flavour.
Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn in a saucepan on a table
Course appetiser, snack
Cuisine British
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
4 people
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 100 g popcorn kernels
  • 75 g unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoons bacon salt
Course appetiser, snack
Cuisine British
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
4 people
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 100 g popcorn kernels
  • 75 g unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoons bacon salt
Buttered Maple and Bacon Salt Popcorn in a saucepan on a table
Instructions
  1. Drizzle the olive oil into a large pan with a lid. Turn the heat on and to test when your popcorn is ready just pour in 3 of the popcorn kernels. Place the lid on and leave for the corn to pop, it will take a minute or so to get going.
  2. As soon as the 3 kernels have popped then you know it’s the right temperature. Pour in the rest of the popcorn, place the lid on and wait until all the popcorn has popped, shaking the pan every now and then to prevent any burning.
  3. Meanwhile melt the butter in a small saucepan with the maple syrup and bacon salt over a medium heat. After the butter has melted it will start sizzling, leave it to sizzle and crackle and so it begins to turn brown. Once the sizzling has stopped and the butter is a nice nutty brown then remove from the heat.
  4. By this time the popcorn should also have stopped popping. As soon as the corn can go 3 seconds without popping then remove from the heat immediately so it doesn’t burn and pour into a bowl.
  5. Pour the maple and bacon salt butter over the popcorn and stir well so it’s coated thoroughly.

SHOP THE RECIPE

Now, you can make the popcorn in any large saucepan with a lid but I would be remiss if I didn’t let you know that I always make my popcorn in my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue. It’s actually great as the popcorn doesn’t stick to the bottom of the casserole or burn as easily as other pans I’ve tried and can fit a lot of popcorn in it which is a bonus. It is pricey though and I wouldn’t recommend you buy if you are only going to make popcorn with it. We use it for everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.

This post is not sponsored but the links above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to click through to buy then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Bacon Salt

A small bowl of bacon salt in front of a jar of bacon salt

Perfectly Sweet n’Salty Popcorn

popcorn in a bowl on a table

Ultimate Popcorn Rocky Road

side view of stack of Ultimate Popcorn Rocky Road bars on baking parchment on wooden board

‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars {gluten-free}

‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars are so deliciously thick and chocolatey with a gluten-free rolled oat base and an ooey gooey fudgey filling of homemade nutella.

A stack of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

I’ve got a bit of exciting news to impart. I’m finally bouncing back from maternity leave and returning to the cake stall next month. Sunday 6th October to be exact, at Stroud Green Market, which is my neighbourhood farmers’ market. I have decided to stay local and stick to the one market for the moment to ease me back into the game. Plus I love the vibe at Stroud Green Market, it is run with a lot of passion with a lovely community feel. I will be selling the usual layer cakes, loaf cakes, bars and delectable goodies which are all totally gluten-free and incredibly delicious.

overhead of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

For the foreseeable future I’ve chosen to not focus on jams, chutneys and other preserves which does disappoint me, but something had to give, besides my sanity. I still look after Cole and Beau for the majority of my week and I haven’t been preserving anything this year whist I’ve adjusted to two little souls to juggle. Although I expect I’ll have a few jars of something moving towards Christmas like my mincemeats or cranberry sauce. I’m very excited to be getting back to proper work and I cannot wait to dive back in.

Even though I have been on maternity leave from the market stall I’ve obviously been just as busy on the blog as ever which has been a great excuse for developing new recipes for the stall. Lately it’s been a recurring theme that I have also been trying to revamp some old recipes which didn’t get as much love as they should the first time round and updating the ingredients and sometimes method to create gluten-free versions. Didja know this blog is all about the gluten-free these days?

overhead of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

These ‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars are a brilliant case in point. I posted the original recipe back in 2014 with some slapdash photos I took when I sold them on one of my first cake stalls. I’ve taken a couple of new photos but I’ve also amended the recipe to make it gluten-free and (whisper) remove the Nutella. There’s something about the ingredients list in Nutella that I’m not quite on board with these days, all that palm oil and sugar doesn’t sound very appealing. But the good news is this version is so much better with a more intense chocolate and hazelnut flavour. Homemade Nutella is pretty darn spesh and here I’ve used a natural hazelnut butter, melted dark chocolate, cocoa powder and a smattering of brown sugar to make the most amazing filling for these oat bars imaginable. The evaporated milk added in at the end is what transforms this incredibly chocolately nut butter into creamy gooey fudge. The rolled oat biscuit crust which holds it together is buttery and crumbly and studded with chocolate chips on the top, because if I can add more chocolate to a recipe then I will.

overhead of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

I’m really looking forward to introducing these 2018 versions of the ‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars to the cake stall. They represent the fully flavoured bakes I love to produce with the best quality gluten-free ingredients. If you live in London or are visiting for the weekend then I’ll be at Stroud Green Market every Sunday from the 6th October and I’d love to see you. I’ll be the one surrounded by a lot of cake.

A stack of Nutella Fudge Oat Bars

Print Recipe
'Nutella' Fudge Oat Bars {gluten-free}
‘Nutella’ Fudge Oat Bars are so deliciously thick and chocolatey with a gluten-free rolled oat base and an ooey gooey fudgey filling of homemade nutella.
Course cake
Cuisine British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Servings
15 bars
Ingredients
  • 100 g sweet white rice flour
  • 40 g tapioca flour
  • 240 g gluten-free rolled oats
  • 100 g hazelnuts roughly chopped
  • 240 g unsalted butter room temperature
  • 185 g soft light brown sugar sifted
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 180 g hazelnut butter
  • 100 g dark chocolate
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons soft light brown sugar
  • 75 ml evaporated milk
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 50 g dark chocolate chips
Course cake
Cuisine British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Servings
15 bars
Ingredients
  • 100 g sweet white rice flour
  • 40 g tapioca flour
  • 240 g gluten-free rolled oats
  • 100 g hazelnuts roughly chopped
  • 240 g unsalted butter room temperature
  • 185 g soft light brown sugar sifted
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 180 g hazelnut butter
  • 100 g dark chocolate
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons soft light brown sugar
  • 75 ml evaporated milk
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 50 g dark chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 160°C and grease an 8 inch square baking tin.
  2. Whisk the sweet rice flour and tapioca flour together until combined.
  3. Add the oats, hazelnuts, butter, sugar, baking powder and salt and rub together with your hands until everything has come together to form a light dough.
  4. Press ½ the dough into the base of the baking tin to form an even layer.
  5. Melt the chocolate, hazelnut butter, cocoa powder and evaporated milk together in a double boiler, mixing together until thoroughly combined.
  6. Spread the ‘nutella’ chocolate mixture on top of the first layer of dough.
  7. Add the chocolate chips to the rest of the dough then crumble the dough on the top and press down lightly into the chocolate, don’t worry too much about it spreading out evenly.
  8. Bake in the oven for 35 minutes until the top is golden brown.
  9. Remove from the oven and leave to cool for an hour or so before removing from the tin. Leave to cool completely on a wire rack before cutting into bars.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I have had this KitchenCraft MasterClass Non-Stick Deep Square Cake Tin with Loose Base, 20 cm (8″) for years and it’s always served me really well. It has a loose base so it’s really easy to remove these oat bars from.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto

Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto is beautifully bright, fresh and creamy. Ideal as a drizzle over grilled meat or roasted veggies.

overhead shot of a bowl of Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto

My season of revisiting classic recipes from the blog continues with this Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto. I have no doubt that this pesto completely passed you by even if you have been reading my witterings here from its early incarnations. Remember Stroud Green Larder? Yes, that was my original name for my business when I began it five years ago which fitted well with my market stall which was based in Stroud Green, North London but alienated all my blog followers, especially those to whom Stroud Green was a pretty random name. I’m not even sure the majority of Londoners necessarily know of Stroud Green, the little stretch between Finsbury Park and Crouch End.

overhead shot of ingredients of Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto in the mixer

Sometimes when I’m feeling especially reflective I wonder if From The Larder is even the best choice of name, a name which I really fought to get, especially since my market stall is focused more on the cake side of things. Although I can’t let myself go too far down that road since I’ve come this far with it and I’m not about to change everything again, it was challenging enough changing the name of my blog and business the first time.

overhead shot of ingredients of Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto in the mixer

So, this Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto, if you’re still with me, was originally developed as an accompaniment to a roasted butternut squash mash recipe where this pesto was drizzled liberally over the top. That dish was out of this world but I could never get the photographs right, it looked like some big old gory mess. Then this pesto soon broke out into a life of its own in my kitchen as I started to accompany it with everything. Drizzled over lamb chops, roasted potatoes or used as the base in this Simple Brown Rice Salad with Pesto Vinaigrette. It became one of my weeknight mainstays and yet was buried within my blog in unsightly photos and an early post which was largely ignored.

overhead shot of ingredients of Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto in the mixer

Therefore I am pretty sure I am introducing this Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto as if it were the first time. It is a bright and fresh pesto with so many layers of flavour. The feta and pistachio give a fresh creaminess and sweet savouriness to the proceedings whilst the mint provides lovely bite with a zing of lemon to bring everything into harmony. I make it with the best feta I can find, there is a great feta and olive guy at Ally Pally farmers’ market, and fresh garden mint.

side shot of a bowl of Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto

Print Recipe
Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto
Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto is beautifully bright, fresh and creamy. Ideal as a drizzle over grilled meat or roasted veggies.
overhead shot of a bowl of Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto
Course Main Dish
Cuisine British
Keyword pesto
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
6-8 people
Ingredients
  • 80 g shelled roasted salted pistachios
  • 30 g fresh mint* leaves removed from stalks
  • 15 g parsley including stalks
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 80 g feta
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • black pepper
  • 150 ml extra virgin olive oil
Course Main Dish
Cuisine British
Keyword pesto
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
6-8 people
Ingredients
  • 80 g shelled roasted salted pistachios
  • 30 g fresh mint* leaves removed from stalks
  • 15 g parsley including stalks
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 80 g feta
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • black pepper
  • 150 ml extra virgin olive oil
overhead shot of a bowl of Feta Pistachio Mint Pesto
Instructions
  1. Place the pistachios in a food processor and blitz until finely ground.
  2. Add the mint, parsley and garlic and blitz again until chopped very finely.
  3. Scoop the feta into the food processor, squeeze in the lemon, and grind in some black pepper then whizz up again so that all the ingredients come together to form a thick paste.
  4. Then with the food processor still on, stream in the olive oil slowly so that it incorporates into the paste and forms a smooth pesto.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I would be nowhere without my Magimix 4200XL Food Processor – Satin which I bought when I was so jealous of everyone making their own houmous and pestos. That was easily over ten years ago and I use it nearly every day for all manner of kitchen jobs like whipping up dips, nut butters and flours, making breadcrumbs and of course for houmous and pesto. The Magixmix is an impressive piece of kit which even survived being dropped when we moved into our house (although it did have to have the motor replaced but that wasn’t too expensive). I put all the attachments in the dishwasher and they come out brilliantly clean but it also gives just great results. I love my Magimix and along with my Kitchenaid is the piece of equipment I use most often in my kitchen.

The links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy anything using the links given then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Plum Nectarine Cornbread Cobbler {gluten-free}

The combination of fruit balances perfectly in this gluten-free Plum Nectarine Cornbread Cobbler. The last nectarines of the season are especially sweet and juicy and the new plums are on the tart side but bursting with flavour.

overhead shot of a plate of plum nectarine cornbread cobbler on a table next to a spoon

You can tell the season is changing as soon as we came into September. It’s the mornings that make the difference. We are usually out first thing walking Billy Buddy, Beau in the buggy, Cole sitting on his little buggy board seat. In August we could get away with t shirts at 7am but now, almost overnight, it’s jumpers and jackets.

overhead shot of plums and nectarines in a bowl

It’s amusing how we can always be so taken aback by the shifting seasons when it happens every single year and really you wonder why it always seems to come as a gleeful surprise. But it is exciting as we see the new fruits being ushered in at the farmers’ market. The table still has a few berry stragglers but really its plums, damsons, apples and pears which take centre-stage.

overhead shot of plums and nectarines in a baking dish

I had the absolute joy of going to the farmers market by myself last weekend. For the first time ever maybe? Cole and Beau were out for the day with their grandparents and Luke and I had to work. When my work entails browsing the farmers’ market for delicious produce which catches my eye you know I have chosen the right career for myself. Even if my bank balance doesn’t always agree.

overhead shot of a baking dish of plum nectarine cornbread cobbler with ice cream

These plums looked glorious, small vibrant orangey red and they definitely stood out. Last year Cole loved plums, that was no indication that he might be into them this year, but I grabbed a couple of punnets with an aim to turn them into something delicious for us all with a few left over for our weekly fruit bowl.

overhead shot of a baking dish of plum nectarine cornbread cobbler with ice cream and a serving spoon

I have been wanting to make a nectarine cobbler for the past few weeks now, married with the gluten-free cornbread mixture I perfected earlier on in the summer. A beautifully easy late summer dessert. These plums seemed a perfect partner for the sweet juicy nectarines. They bring out the perfect balance in each other, plums can be a gamble, either sweet or tart and you’re never quite sure what you’ll be getting until you started eating one. I mixed the fruit with a small smattering of brown sugar and some homemade bourbon vanilla extract, but you can use just normal vanilla extract and/or a teaspoon of bourbon as well if you like.

overhead shot of a plate of plum nectarine cornbread cobbler on a table next to a spoon

Cobblers, crisps and crumbles are ideal desserts for bridging the gap between seasons, at the moment whilst the midday air is still warm they are delicious with ice cream but towards the end of the month we’ll probably be serving them with custard.

side shot of a plate of plum nectarine cornbread cobbler on a table

Print Recipe
Plum Nectarine Cornbread Cobbler {gluten-free}
The combination of fruit balances perfectly in this gluten-free Nectarine Plum Cornbread Cobbler. The last nectarines of the season are especially sweet and juicy and the new plums are on the tart side but bursting with flavour.
overhead shot of a plate of plum nectarine cornbread cobbler on a table next to a spoon
Course dessert
Cuisine British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Servings
8 people
Ingredients
For the fruit:
  • 400 g plums
  • 450 g nectarines
  • 1 teaspoon bourbon vanilla extract
  • 40 g soft light brown sugar
For the cornbread topping
  • 120 g gluten-free flour
  • 120 g cornmeal
  • 60 g caster sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 180 ml buttermilk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 45 g unsalted butter melted and cooled
Course dessert
Cuisine British
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Servings
8 people
Ingredients
For the fruit:
  • 400 g plums
  • 450 g nectarines
  • 1 teaspoon bourbon vanilla extract
  • 40 g soft light brown sugar
For the cornbread topping
  • 120 g gluten-free flour
  • 120 g cornmeal
  • 60 g caster sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 180 ml buttermilk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 45 g unsalted butter melted and cooled
overhead shot of a plate of plum nectarine cornbread cobbler on a table next to a spoon
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 170°C.
  2. First prepare the fruit, by slicing in half lengthways around the stone, plucking out the stone and then slicing the fruit lengthways.
  3. Tip the fruit into the base of a baking dish of medium size and scatter over the vanilla extract and the sugar, mixing so the fruit is well coated.
  4. Then make the cornbread topping by whisking together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt in a large bowl.
  5. In a jug whisk together the buttermilk, egg, honey and melted butter.
  6. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, stirring until they are completely combined and a thick texture.
  7. With your hands roll the cornbread mixture into large even flat rounds and place on top of the fruit in the baking dish, making sure all the fruit is covered to the best you can.
  8. Bake the cobbler for 25-30 minutes.

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