Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese

overhead view of Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese

Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese is the perfect appetiser or canapé when you are entertaining. Naturally gluten-free, very easy to prepare and always impressive.

overhead view of Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese

When we were young our whole family would gather at my aunt’s house on Christmas morning for a quick hello, present exchange and glass of Buck’s Fizz. There would be a crowd of us of every age range, greeting grannies, clutching presents and dressed in our Christmas finery. Plates of small squares of brown bread, barely buttered, and adorned with wafer thin slices of lemony smoked salmon would make their way across the room, swiped by eager fingers. This is how I first experienced smoked salmon and is the measure of any Christmas canapé I’ve had since, made even more delicious by the rose tinted nostalgia.

side view of Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese

So every Christmas I also serve smoked salmon to my small gathering. I don’t eat the brown bread anymore but have replaced it with the most light and fluffy potato pancakes. Naturally gluten-free, made with mashed potato, potato flour and eggs. They are incredibly easy to whip up on Christmas morning but you can also make them a couple of days in advance and just warm them up in the oven to refresh them. Although do serve them at room temperature as you don’t want the cream cheese to melt.

Speaking of cream cheese, I feel it’s an utterly necessary accompaniment to my smoked salmon these days. Whipped up with crème fraiche, a spritz of fresh lemon and slathered thickly onto the pancakes, it’s the ideal cool backdrop to the delicate salmon. However, instead of the restrained slice of smoked salmon we used to have on our bread years ago, I like to pile these potato pancakes high so they look beautifully impressive. One or two of these pancakes per person will be plenty.

overhead view of Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese

If you make this Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own kitchen creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese
Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese is the perfect appetiser or canapé when you are entertaining. Naturally gluten-free, very easy to prepare and always impressive.
overhead view of Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese
Course appetiser
Cuisine British
Keyword smoked salmon
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 18 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
10 pancakes
Ingredients
Potato Pancakes
  • 300 g peeled potatoes quartered
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg whites
  • 50 g potato flour
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives + extra to sprinkle
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black peper
  • 1 tablespoon ghee or butter
  • 300 g smoked salmon
Whipped Cream Cheese
  • 200 g cream cheese
  • 100 g crème fraiche
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • pinch of salt
Course appetiser
Cuisine British
Keyword smoked salmon
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 18 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
10 pancakes
Ingredients
Potato Pancakes
  • 300 g peeled potatoes quartered
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg whites
  • 50 g potato flour
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives + extra to sprinkle
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black peper
  • 1 tablespoon ghee or butter
  • 300 g smoked salmon
Whipped Cream Cheese
  • 200 g cream cheese
  • 100 g crème fraiche
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • pinch of salt
overhead view of Smoked Salmon on Potato Pancakes with Whipped Cream Cheese
Instructions
  1. Place the peeled potatoes in a large saucepan of salted water and bring up to a boil. Turn down to simmer for 12-15 minutes until the potatoes are quite soft.
  2. Remove from the heat and drain. Mash the potatoes with a pinch of salt and place in the fridge to chill for at least an hour.
  3. Mix the cooled mashed potato in a large bowl with the eggs, egg whites, potato flour, chives and salt and pepper and beat together with a wooden spoon until smooth.
  4. Place a cast iron pan or large griddle on a low heat and melt the ghee or butter.
  5. Drop a heaped dessert spoon of the potato batter into the pan, smoothing out a little so it makes an even circle. You should be able to fit four of these potato pancakes in the pan, depending on its size.
  6. Cook the pancakes for 3-4 minutes on the first side, then flip and cook for another couple of minutes on the second. Remove the pancakes from the pan and pat dry with kitchen paper to remove the excess butter.
  7. Cook the rest of the pancakes in batches until all the batter has been used up.
  8. Set the pancakes to one side whilst you prepare the whipped cream cheese.
  9. Beat together the cream cheese, crème fraiche, lemon juice and salt until light and creamy.
  10. Spoon the cream cheese onto each pancake, smoothing into a slight swirl, then pile high with smoked salmon. Garnish with snipped chives, a squeeze of lemon and plenty of cracked black pepper. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from an old recipe in Olive Magazine (I’m pretty sure)

*I like to use ghee when shallow frying due to its high smoking point. Feel free to use butter but keep a close eye to make sure it doesn’t burn.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I have been using this Ghee Easy Organic Ghee, 850 g ever since I completed my last Whole30. I fell in love with this ingredient for its lovely clean taste and also because it’s so good to fry with as it doesn’t burn like butter due to its high smoking point.

One of my very favourite saucepans is my cast iron skillet pan and it is what I used for making these potato pancakes. I originally asked Luke to get me this for Christmas a couple of years ago as I was keen on an implement that could be easily transferred from hob to oven and this is ideal. I use it a lot for cooking whole chicken breasts, by searing the chicken on in the skillet on the hob and then finishing off for 10 minutes in the oven. It’s now invaluable to me and the pan I have is the Dust 40510-617-0 Frypan with cast iron handle, cast iron, black, 26 cm which I love love love.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake is an easy cake to assemble last minute. A lightly spiced almond sponge made incredibly festive by its secret ingredient – mincemeat. Drizzled with a quick tipsy Brandy Cream Icing.

Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

It’s not that I don’t like regular Christmas Cake. I’m happy to eat a boozy fruit cake any time of the year. However, I always feel that on top of the Christmas pudding and all the mince pies, a traditional Christmas cake can sometimes be a bit too much.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice on a plate in front

This Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake is my favourite way to keep a Christmas cake in the mix whilst making it a little more accessible and not just something your great aunt is going to enjoy. Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake still has all the right flavours going on so no one is going to feel hard done by. It’s festive with spices, brandy and plump fruits. But as it is primarily a sponge cake and not a fruit cake it’s so much lighter and a bit more modern.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake

It’s also incredibly quick to assemble as we’re taking a bit of a shortcut to Christmas by using mincemeat. I will always advocate homemade mincemeat in any recipe where it is required as I think the shop bought stuff is pretty terrible. All sugar and no taste. The good news is that homemade mincemeat is really easy, hopefully you have already made yours otherwise this Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake might be a slightly longer process than you initially believed. At a push, of course you can use the shop bought stuff, the cake will still be delicious.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice taken out

To make the cake even easier to bring together I used a gluten-free plain flour blend, Freee by Doves Farm Gluten Free Plain White Flour 1kg (Pack of 5)” to be exact. You can use any blend but ideally without xanthan gum. By adding an equal amount of gluten-free plain flour and ground almonds we’re ensuring the sponge stays beautifully moist with plenty of fluffiness. The ground almonds add a lovely taste and if you grind your own almonds, which I did here, so it’s more like an almond meal, then the cake will have a pleasantly nubby texture that sits really nicely with the mincemeat. My mincemeat had chopped almonds in already so there is lots of nuttiness going on.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice on a plate in front

The Brandy Cream Icing is gorgeously sweet, creamy and subtle with brandy. However, if you would rather make an icing without the booze then just omit the brandy and add in more milk and a teaspoon of vanilla extract.

Close up of Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake with slice on a plate in front

If you make this Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious creation, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake
Cheat’s Gluten-Free Christmas Cake is an easy cake to assemble last minute. A lightly spiced almond sponge made incredibly festive by its secret ingredient – mincemeat. Drizzled with a quick tipsy Brandy Cream Icing.
Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake
Course cake
Cuisine British
Keyword cake, christmas
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
12 people
Ingredients
  • 275 g caster sugar
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 180 g gluten-free plain flour
  • 180 g ground almonds
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • teaspoons mixed spice
  • 280 g mincemeat
Brandy Cream Icing
  • 300 g icing sugar
  • 3-4 tablespoons double cream
  • 3-4 tablespoons brandy
Course cake
Cuisine British
Keyword cake, christmas
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
12 people
Ingredients
  • 275 g caster sugar
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 180 g gluten-free plain flour
  • 180 g ground almonds
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • teaspoons mixed spice
  • 280 g mincemeat
Brandy Cream Icing
  • 300 g icing sugar
  • 3-4 tablespoons double cream
  • 3-4 tablespoons brandy
Cheat's Gluten-Free Christmas Cake
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4.
  2. Line and grease a 9 inch round cake tin.
  3. Cream the sugar with the butter on a slow to medium speed for about 6 minutes until light and fluffy.
  4. Beat the eggs in one at a time, mixing well between additions.
  5. Add the vanilla extract.
  6. Whisk the flour with the almonds, baking powder and salt in a separate bowl then beat into the rest of the ingredients.
  7. Stir in the mincemeat.
  8. Pour the batter into the cake tin, smoothing out the surface then bake for 1 hour or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  9. Leave for about 5 minutes for the cake to settle then carefully remove from the tin and leave to cool on a wire rack before icing.
Brandy Cream Icing
  1. Stir the icing sugar together with the double cream until smooth.
  2. Stir in the brandy one tablespoon at a time until the icing has reached a thick dropping consistency.
  3. Spoon over the top of the cake nudging it towards the edges so it drips down the sides.
Recipe Notes

*I used a suet based mincemeat so there was a bit more fat in the mix. If you are using a non-suet mincemeat perhaps increase the butter by 20g.

SHOP THE RECIPE

If you’re a gluten-free baker in the UK then you will be very familiar with Freee by Doves Farm Gluten Free Plain White Flour 1kg (Pack of 5) as it’s pretty much the only gluten-free flour that’s easily accessible for the home baker. For this cake it works really well in combination with ground almonds for a lovely moist cake.

I didn’t have a decent 9 inch cake tin for this recipe so I invested in this PME Anodised Aluminium Round Cake Pan 9 x 4-Inch Deep which is from my favourite range of cake tins. They are wonderful as they have completely straight sides so your cakes will be beautifully neat, the anodised aluminium means the heat disperses evenly throughout the cake without cooking the sides too quickly, which some darker cake tins do. The cakes slip out of the tins easily and they come in all the sizes you would need, I think I may almost have the whole set now.

I love these Kitchen Craft Paul Hollywood 2-Tier Stackable Wire Cooling Rack, 40 x 26 x 35 cm (16″ x 10″ x 14″), don’t be put off that they are part of the Paul Hollywood range as they are actually really useful as they are nice and high which allow more air to get to your cakes to cool quickly. Some cooling racks are too close to the kitchen counter which traps in more moisture as the cakes are cooling down which could lead to a wetter sponge. These are great.

I love these dinky these reindeer cake toppers-  Anniversary House Reindeer Plastic Cake Toppers. Pack of 6. BX164 – so super cute!

and I bought these trees years ago for some Christmas crafts and found they have been more useful ever since decorating my Christmas cakes – Set of 3 Snowy Bristle Xmas Trees for Christmas Cake Decotation

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Boxing Day Ale Chutney

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

This Boxing Day Ale Chutney is the perfect addition to your cheeseboard. It’s also particularly delicious with leftover Christmas ham or turkey. Sweetly spiced with chunky vegetables and plenty of tang.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day is definitely my favourite day over the holiday period. It has none of the high expectations of Christmas Day. There’s no early morning hysteria or panic because you forgot to put the turkey on/buy the Brussels/wrap Adrian’s present. I spend most of Christmas Day in the kitchen, rushing back and forth between filling glasses with Bucks Fizz, trying to be with the children for the opening of every present and shooing Billy Buddy away from the mince pies. It’s exhausting.

mid shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day has none of that palaver though. You can lie in, well you can if you don’t have children. It’s not frowned upon to have chocolate for breakfast as it’s technically still Christmas and all those Lindor Lindts have to be demolished before New Year. You’re free to spend all day watching movies, drinking the Bucks Fizz you didn’t really have time for the day before whilst wearing your new Christmas jammies. Plus you can eschew cooking for cheese, biscuits and cold cuts and the trifle that you prepared on Christmas Eve. At least that’s how I roll with Boxing Day and I will not compromise it for anyone.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

As anyone knows who has prepared a Boxing Day buffet for all the Christmas Day stragglers the accompaniments for your cheese and meats are so important. It’s all very well splashing out on decent stilton and the good oatcakes but since you are dumbing down the cooking aspect of it then the effort has to show somewhere so you can still wear your perfect host/hostess crown with pride. This is when preparing your Boxing Day Ale Chutney early doors in December will pay off dividends.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

I have been making this Boxing Day Ale Chutney for a few years now when I realised I needed a more everyman’s pickle to go with the cheeseboard. I had Courgette Relish and Stem Ginger and Apple Chutney but my family were clamouring for more of a ploughmans preserve. This Boxing Day Ale Chutney fits the bill absolutely. It’s simple to make since after only 15 minutes of chopping you just throw everything into a large saucepan to get to know each other. It doesn’t have a long cooking time compared to other chutneys, just an hour or two, and can pretty much be eaten straight away. However, if you decant into sterilised jars then it will also keep for a good few months, or until you open it on Boxing Day.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day Ale Chutney is beautifully chunky with root vegetables, sweet with tomatoes, dates, spices and gluten-free pale ale. It’s also tangy with cider vinegar and mustard so holds its own against strong cheese and robust meats.

The best thing is if you decide to get ahead and make your chutney now then you’ll have plenty of jars to give away as Christmas presents. Then all your friends and relatives can reap the benefit of your Boxing Day Ale Chutney too. I guarantee they will be begging for the recipe.

mid shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

If you make this Boxing Day Ale Chutney then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious creation, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Boxing Day Ale Chutney
Boxing Day Ale Chutney is the perfect addition to your cheeseboard. It’s also particularly delicious with leftover Christmas ham or turkey. Sweetly spiced with chunky vegetables and plenty of tang.
overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard
Cuisine British
Keyword chutney
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 90 minutes
Servings
10 190g jars
Ingredients
  • 3 onions about 400g
  • 1 swede about 375g chopped
  • 2 large carrots about 300g carrots
  • 3 granny smith apples
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled and diced
  • 175 g dates pitted
  • 140 g tomato puree
  • 325 g light soft brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons black treacle
  • 300 ml cider vinegar
  • tablespoons mustard powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground mace
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 500 ml gluten-free pale ale
Cuisine British
Keyword chutney
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 90 minutes
Servings
10 190g jars
Ingredients
  • 3 onions about 400g
  • 1 swede about 375g chopped
  • 2 large carrots about 300g carrots
  • 3 granny smith apples
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled and diced
  • 175 g dates pitted
  • 140 g tomato puree
  • 325 g light soft brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons black treacle
  • 300 ml cider vinegar
  • tablespoons mustard powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground mace
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 500 ml gluten-free pale ale
overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard
Instructions
  1. Put all ingredients into a large preserving pot with 150ml water and 250ml of the ale.
  2. Bring to a gentle simmer, stirring occasionally, and cook for an hour.
  3. Take the chutney off the heat and pour in the rest of the ale.
  4. Return the chutney to the heat and cook for a further 30 minutes.
  5. Remove from the heat and decant into sterilised jars*.
Recipe Notes

This recipe is slightly adapted from Hearty Ale Chutney from Preserves: River Cottage Handbook No.2 by Pam Corbin The chutney will keep up to a year if stored in a cool dark place.

*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.

The chutney will keep up to a year if stored in a cool dark place.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I find my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue absolutely indispensable when I’m making any type of preserve or indeed anything in the kitchen. It’s very heavy duty but I use it for absolutely everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.


This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Homemade Crystallised Ginger

Homemade Crystallised Stem Ginger (or Candied Ginger) is a spicy treat. Excellent as a little nibble with some coffee, an adornment to baked goods or given away as a beautiful sparkly gift.

close up shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger

Did you have a go at Homemade Stem Ginger in syrup already? If you have then you’ll be streaks ahead in this recipe as Homemade Crystallised Stem Ginger is pretty much the same method but with a couple of extra steps.

But first things first.

What is the difference between Stem Ginger and Crystallised Ginger?

In UK supermarkets the most commonly found ginger products in the baking aisles are Stem Ginger and Crystallised Ginger. The ingredient known as Stem Ginger is balls of ginger preserved in a gingery syrup which I tackled in my previous recipe for Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup. Crystallised Ginger is the same preserved ginger but it is dried and rolled instead in a coating of sugar.

Since Stem Ginger is kept in its syrup it’s a much softer ingredient and excellent baked into cakes, cookies or in savoury dishes where it adds a hot sweetness You can use Crystallised Ginger in exactly the same way but it has a firmer grittier texture and probably not recommended for savoury dishes due to its sugar coating. Crystallised Ginger is also the better candidate for the decoration of baked goods and really comes into its own as a standalone treat with a cup of tea.

overhead shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger

Crystallised Ginger really is quite easy to make. You should follow all the simple steps to make the Stem Ginger in Syrup which includes an initial simmer in water to tenderise the ginger followed by a couple of hours cooking in sugar syrup. However, whereas at this point you would decant the ginger with its syrup into jars for the previous recipe, here you remove the ginger from the syrup, dry it on a wire rack then roll in sugar.

Ways to use leftover ginger syrup

With this recipe you will be left with the most deliciously fiery ginger syrup which will really come into its own in your kitchen. Keep it in a jar in the fridge alongside your ginger for a dozen uses:

  • Topped up with prosecco for Gingerbread Bellinis
  • Used instead of honey in your marinades
  • Drizzled over ice cream, cakes, porridge
  • In salad dressings
  • Poured into coffee for the best Gingerbread Lattes
  • Or as the basis for this amazing 4 ingredient Salted Ginger Fudge

Crystallised Ginger makes a stunning homemade gift, all golden and sparkly in its jar. Alternatively it could be displayed resplendent on a cheeseboard or served with your after dinner coffee.

mid shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger

If you make this Crystallised Ginger recipe then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this lovely ingredient as the VIP in your own baking or cooking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Homemade Crystallised Ginger
Homemade Crystallised Stem Ginger (or Candied Ginger) is a spicy treat. Excellent as a little nibble with some coffee, an adornment to baked goods or given away as a beautiful sparkly gift.
mid shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger
Course preserve
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Passive Time 2 days
Servings
1x 500g jar
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar + 100g extra sugar to roll
  • 600 ml water
Course preserve
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Passive Time 2 days
Servings
1x 500g jar
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar + 100g extra sugar to roll
  • 600 ml water
mid shot of a pot of Homemade Crystallised Ginger
Instructions
Day 1
  1. Freeze ginger overnight to tenderise.
Day 2
  1. Remove the ginger from the freezer and wait for about 5-10 minutes for the ginger to warm slightly then peel and slice into pieces. There should be about 450g ginger after peeling and chopping
  2. Cook the ginger in a large saucepan with the lid on for 2½ hours in 1.4 litres water until the ginger is tender.
  3. Drain the ginger but reserve water.
  4. Then weigh the water, you will need about 600ml so add more water if it’s slightly less or pour some away if it’s more.
  5. Pour the water back into the saucepan and add the granulated sugar.
  6. Bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  7. Add the ginger back in and bring back to a boil then simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Remove from the heat and leave to cool. Then cover the saucepan and leave overnight.
Day 3
  1. Place the pan back on the heat. Bring the ginger in syrup back to the boil and turn down to simmer with the lid on for 1-2 hours until the syrup is thick and the ginger is translucent and very tender.
  2. Remove the ginger with a fork onto a wire rack to cool and dry overnight.
  3. Roll the dry ginger in sugar and store in a sterilised glass jar.*
Recipe Notes

*I store my Crystallised Ginger in the fridge where it lasts for about 3 months.

But what do you do with all that leftover ginger syrup? Try this 4 ingredient Salted Ginger Fudge. You don’t have to make this fudge the same day that you made the Crystallised Ginger. Take a break, wait a day or so. Your syrup will sit happily covered at room temperature whilst you find more time.

If you are wondering what to do with all the leftover syrup once you have finished your Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup then why not try this easy Salted Ginger Fudge recipe. It only has four ingredients and is absolutely delicious. You can download the recipe at the link below.

A plate of salted ginger fudge next to a piece of ginger

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Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup is sweet, spicy and much brighter than the shop bought stuff. It’s so easy to make and is a wonderful ingredient for all types of recipes.

An open jar of Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

This week I’m giving my posts over to ginger. Fresh ginger is a bit of a special ingredient isn’t it? It can be used in everything from sweet to savoury and is used all over the world from traditional British cooking to traditional Asian cooking. It is spicy and fiery and at the same time feels so good for you. In fact it is so good for you. Ginger helps nausea, relieve muscle soreness, it is also an anti-inflammatory, lowers blood sugars, helps with indigestion, menstruation cramps and can help lower cholesterol. It’s no wonder we love ginger and use it so prolifically.

A plate of stem ginger

One of my favourite ways to incorporate ginger into my baking and cooking is the jars of stem ginger in syrup which you can find in the baking department of the supermarket. It is an ingredient I turn to time and time again as it works in so many different places, adding a subtle ginger kick to recipes such as Green Tomato and Stem Ginger Streusel Cake, Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin, Strawberry and Stem Ginger Sangria or Apple and Stem Ginger Chutney.

Chopped stem ginger

My use of stem ginger doesn’t just stop at the little balls of ginger either, I love to use the syrup in recipes. The sweet syrup infused with plenty of ginger kick can be used to liven up cocktails, be poured over ice cream or to sweeten up fruit salads.

In fact I use stem ginger in syrup so much that I wondered if there was a way I could take my love of it to the next level. Of course there was. I could make my own.

A jar of Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

Now my investigation into how to make Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup led me to the very interesting realisation that not only is it super quick and easy to make your own with so much more flavour intensity but the recipe is only a few steps away to making Crystallised Stem Ginger. If you like Stem Ginger in Syrup then you know you’re going to love Crystallised Stem Ginger, a beautiful sweet treat that’s delicious on its own or as cake decoration or as an accompaniment to a plain sponge or ice cream. So I couldn’t help myself. I am sharing both of these recipes.

Today I’m giving you the lowdown on how to make your own Stem Ginger in Syrup, followed by my next post on how to take that recipe one step further to create Crystallised Stem Ginger. If you’re still with me after that then you can choose to be treated to a very special recipe on how to use all your leftover syrup. We’re going to make the most delicious Salted Ginger Fudge

A jar of Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup

All of these recipes are great for your own personal use but they are also ideal if you are looking for a special homemade gift this season. The Stem Ginger in syrup is oh so useful and a lovely pressie for the home baker. The Crystallised Ginger will be appreciated by everyone, it is such a treat and so beautiful in a jar. There will be some very happy people on Christmas morning.

So let’s not dilly dally any more, let me light the way towards the recipe for Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup.

Jars of Homemade Stem Ginger in syrup

If you make this Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup recipe then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this lovely ingredient as the VIP in your own baking or cooking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup is sweet, spicy and much brighter than the shop bought stuff. It's so easy to make and is a wonderful ingredient for all types of recipes.
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Servings
2 380g jars
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar
  • 600 ml water
Cuisine British
Keyword ginger
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Servings
2 380g jars
Ingredients
  • 600 g fresh ginger
  • 600 g granulated sugar
  • 600 ml water
Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup
Instructions
Day 1
  1. Freeze ginger overnight to tenderise.
Day 2
  1. Remove the ginger from the freezer and wait for about 5-10 minutes for the ginger to warm slightly then peel and slice into pieces. There should be about 450g ginger after peeling and chopping
  2. Cook the ginger in a large saucepan with the lid on for 2½ hours in 1.4 litres water until the ginger is tender.
  3. Drain the ginger but reserve water.
  4. Then weigh the water, you will need about 600ml so add more water if it’s slightly less or pour some away if it’s more.
  5. Pour the water back into the saucepan and add the granulated sugar.
  6. Bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  7. Add the ginger back in and bring back to a boil then simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Turn off the heat and behold your stem ginger in syrup.
  9. To store your ginger, scoop out the ginger and pack into sterilised jars*, topping the jars up with the syrup to completely cover the ginger.
Recipe Notes

*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.

Do you want to go a step further for Homemade [recipe]Crystallised Ginger? Then stay tuned for my next post…

If you are wondering what to do with all the leftover syrup once you have finished your Homemade Stem Ginger in Syrup then why not try this easy Salted Ginger Fudge recipe. It only has four ingredients and is absolutely delicious. You can download the recipe at the link below.

A plate of salted ginger fudge next to a piece of ginger

SHOP THE RECIPE

I absolutely love this Kuhn Rikon Piranha Y Peeler, Green and it’s excellent at peeling the fresh ginger for this recipe. It’s specifically designed for peeling smooth/fuzzy skins such as tomatoes, peppers, peaches, kiwi fruits but I use it for so much more. It has razor-sharp serrated stainless steel blade and grips securely so won’t slip and produces paper-thin strips so you don’t lose any of your precious ginger.

I find my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue absolutely indispensable when I’m making any type of preserve or indeed anything in the kitchen. It’s very heavy duty but I use it for absolutely everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce {gluten-free}

This Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce is a delightful alternative take on the Christmas Pudding. Still rich with fruit and spices but imbued with velvety pools of chocolate and the sharp sweetness of clementines.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

I hate to break it to you but this weekend is the last Sunday before advent. There is no denying it any more, Christmas will soon be upon us and in no time we’ll be scrabbling around on Christmas Eve desperately trying to wrap up all the stocking presents, brine the turkey and wrestle the children into bed.

Amid the present and meal prep chaos there is definitely one job you don’t want to be doing on Christmas Eve and that’s making a Christmas Pudding. Let’s face it if you haven’t made it by then it’s more than likely you’ll be swinging by Tesco before it closes hoping they haven’t sold out of all the gluten-free ones. There’s nothing like a homemade Christmas Pudding though. That’s why it’s best to get ahead and tradition decrees that the fifth sunday before Christmas is the ideal day for such a job. It’s Stir-Up Sunday people!

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

Stir-Up Sunday harkens way back to Victorian times and gets its name from the opening of the book of common prayer which is read on the last Sunday before advent ‘Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people’ It seems that the Victorians took the bible at its word and it soon became tradition to stir up your Christmas Pudding on that day too. And with good reason, it’s such a good idea to get it out of the way early doors. After its initial steam a Christmas Pudding can sit quite happily for weeks or even months and even tastes better the longer you leave it.

Christmas Pudding evokes such childhood nostalgia for me that a generous portion at Christmas is more than a delicious dessert, it’s like a transportation device to my past. I loved the Christmas Pudding our Auntie Lil always used to make us but I also have a fondness for the one we were served every year at school.

Christmas time at our school was magical. The whole school would sit at tables in the main dining hall, an ancient and creaking cavernous room, all wooden beams and pillars with a balcony high above surrounding the room where the older years would sit. Just after the Christmas Pudding was served the lights would be turned off so we were in pitch darkness. The room would fall silent, all 700 children, and a beautiful choral echo would be heard faintly from outside. As the singing grew stronger, our choral society would hover into the room, shrouded in capes, holding candles and singing haunting Latin carols. The memory of Christmas Pudding drowning in brandy sauce still in our mouths. Perhaps if we were lucky a faint metallic taste might be on our tongues as well which meant that we had been one of the hallowed few to have found a penny wrapped in foil in our serving. To be treasured indeed.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

My recipe for Traditional Christmas Pudding is usually the one I turn to every year and although I will never tire of it I fancied a change. So this Christmas I will be making this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce and I could not be more excited to share it with my family, it’s utterly delicious.

What I love about this recipe that even though this pudding is beautifully chocolately it is still most definitely Christmas Pudding and the flavours marry together so well. The teff flour, which is the gluten-free flour I chose for this recipe works so beautifully in support of the chocolate. There is so much texture in this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding, the molton puddles of chocolate chips give the pudding a softness, the dried fruit give a lovely chew with a final nobbly crunch from the nuts. And despite all the rich flavours going on, this Christmas Pudding is lighter than you think, it’s not stodgy at all. As long as you don’t let it sit after it has finished steaming and serve straightaway.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

The Cointreau Sauce is a nod to the brandy sauce we were always served at school and actually I think this may be my favourite accompaniment to the pudding. It’s adapted from a Delia Smith recipe for her Brandy Sauce and it is light and simple. The gentle flavour of the Cointreau Sauce lets the pudding speak for itself whilst providing the much needed sauce and a spicy after kick of Cointreau.

Also a little bit of advice on this recipe, I know we’re all about Stir-Up Sunday but since this recipe takes a couple of days to make you will probably want to start prepping on the Saturday. Stir-Up Saturday if you will. This means you can do the final bit of work and the big steam on the Sunday rather than the job bleeding into your working week.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

If you do fancy ringing in the changes with your Christmas pudding this year then I urge you to give this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce a go, and if you do then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you use this recipe as a jumping off point for your own twist on the Christmas pud then I’d also love it if you’d share your version and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce {gluten-free}
This Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce is a delightful alternative take on the Christmas Pudding
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours total
Servings
10 people
Ingredients
Day One
  • 115 g sultanas
  • 115 g currants
  • 100 g dried cranberries
  • 20 g mixed peel
  • 40 g whole almonds chopped up
  • 1 grated bramley apple about 250g
  • juice and zest 2 clementines + 1 extra for decoration
  • 50 ml Cointreau
Day 2
  • 2 eggs
  • 80 g fresh shredded suet*
  • 125 g chocolate chips
  • 115 g light muscovado sugar
  • 80 g gluten-free breadcrumbs
  • 80 g teff flour
  • 20 g tapioca flour
  • 25 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
Cointreau Sauce
  • 40 g butter
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 40 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 2 tablespoons Cointreau
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours total
Servings
10 people
Ingredients
Day One
  • 115 g sultanas
  • 115 g currants
  • 100 g dried cranberries
  • 20 g mixed peel
  • 40 g whole almonds chopped up
  • 1 grated bramley apple about 250g
  • juice and zest 2 clementines + 1 extra for decoration
  • 50 ml Cointreau
Day 2
  • 2 eggs
  • 80 g fresh shredded suet*
  • 125 g chocolate chips
  • 115 g light muscovado sugar
  • 80 g gluten-free breadcrumbs
  • 80 g teff flour
  • 20 g tapioca flour
  • 25 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
Cointreau Sauce
  • 40 g butter
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 40 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 2 tablespoons Cointreau
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce
Instructions
  1. Mix everything from the Day 1 list of ingredients together in a large mixing bowl. Cover with cling film and leave to marinate overnight.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients from Day 2 and stir together really well.
  3. Butter a pudding basin, and slice the extra clementine, tucking the slices into the bottom of the basin.
  4. Fill the pudding basin with the pudding mixture then prepare the basin for the steam.
  5. Take a piece of greaseproof paper and lie a piece of foil on top, make a fold in the centre of both pieces which allows for more room for the steam to rise. Place these over the top of the pudding basin, with the foil on top, securing with string around the pudding. Trim off any excess paper and foil, you don't want them to hanging too low as otherwise they will soak up the water during the steam.
  6. Place a wire rack (or a folded up tea towel) into a large lidded pot, deep enough to cover the pudding. Then place the pudding on top of the rack.
  7. Fill the pot up with boiling water until halfway up the pudding. The water should not touch the greaseproof paper or foil otherwise they will soak it up and the pudding will go soggy. Place the lid on the pot and turn the heat on so the water is kept at a simmer.
  8. Steam for four hours, checking the water level occasionally and topping up if necessary.
  9. Remove the pudding from its pot then leave to cool. Once cool re-wrap the pudding in fresh greaseproof paper and foil and store in a cool dark place until Christmas Day.
  10. On Christmas Day the puddings will need a final steam before serving so repeat steps 6 and 7. However your pudding will only need two hours this time.
  11. Turn your pudding out onto a plate and serve with the Cointreau sauce.
Cointreau Sauce
  1. Melt the butter in a large saucepan then add the sweet rice flour.
  2. Pour in the milk gradually and bring the sauce up to a gentle boil. Add the sugar and continue cooking for about 10 minutes.
  3. Pour in the cream and bring the sauce to a low simmer.
  4. Finally turn off heat and add the Cointreau. Serve hot with the Christmas pudding.
Recipe Notes

*It’s just not possible to buy gluten-free pre-packaged suet so do speak to your local butcher about obtaining fresh suet. It will come in a solid block which you will need to grate with a bit of gluten-free flour so that it can evenly disperse throughout the mincemeat.

Cointreau Sauce adapted from Delia Smith's Brandy Sauce

SHOP THE RECIPE

I always use Callebaut Chocolate Dark 70.5 Percent Easi-Melt Buttons Callets 2.5 Kg in all my chocolate recipes. It comes in a big old bag but if you bake a lot then these chocolate pellets are simply delicious and so good to bake with.

There are a few brands of lovely teff flour that I like to use but for this Christmas Pudding I used yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Brown Teff Flour 1kg. It has a lovely taste and soft texture.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

I love my Cornishware Blue and White Stripe Pudding Basin 1.1L 40oz which I use for all my steamed puddings, it’s so beautiful and sturdy and is about to really come into its own as I make my Christmas Pudding in the next couple of weeks.

Bakers twine is super useful in baking and for securing your foil lid to your steamed puddings. I use Tenn Well 200m 3Ply Bakers Twine, Kitchen Cotton Twine Food Safe Cooking String Perfect for Trussing and Tying Poultry Meat Making Sausage DIY Crafts and Decoration (White)

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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