Gluten-Free Gravy

This Gluten-Free Gravy is deliciously smooth, rich and full of flavour. Here are all the tips and tricks to get it just right.

Gluten-Free Gravy

My mother and father both made good gravy. It was an absolutely essential recipe in our household growing up because of the importance of our Sunday Lunch. Thick juicy rich brown gravy flavoured with fresh garden herbs would cook for hours on the hob over the course of the day. It was always the last element to be placed steaming hot onto the dinner table. Two magnificent gravy boats stood proudly at either end to be poured liberally over our roast beef and Yorkshire puddings.

Ours was not a household for thin wispy gravy made delicately from drizzled juices. Our gravy was the crowning glory of the meal and did double duty as it provided the ultimate treat when our meat and veggies were done. My father would return to the kitchen to grab a loaf of thick farmhouse bread and cut huge slices for each of us to place on our dinner plates. We would then soak the bread in any leftover gravy, with perhaps an extra slug of mint sauce, wait until the bread was deliciously soppy before devouring greedily. It was a ritual and it didn’t matter how stuffed you were after lunch, the bread and gravy was a must and the bit we most looked forward to and tried to save room for.

The importance of our Sunday lunch has not wavered into my adulthood and since I became gluten-free it has been of utmost importance to me to achieve a triumphant gravy that would pacify the whole family. I don’t do the bread and gravy thing with my family, which is a huge loss really. However, I can’t help but sneak back into the kitchen on the odd occasion, when all the plates have been cleared, and help myself to just one more Yorkshire pudding dragged through the gravy pan for that last little treat when no one else is watching.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How to make gravy with drippings

If you want to make proper actual traditional gravy then your only choice is to use the pan drippings from your roasted meat. There are two ways of doing this. You can either make a quick gravy at the end of your meal whilst your meat is resting or if you don’t want your gravy to be a last minute rush and you want to get really good flavour then you could plan ahead. We make a Sunday Lunch every week and on the odd occasion that I don’t make a traditional gravy I will save my drippings and keep them in little pots in the freezer, alongside my homemade stock. I have a whole compartment dedicated to fat and stock. So when I need to make a gravy I always have drippings to hand, plus it means I can make my gravy ahead. This is especially useful at Christmas as I can make my gravy a couple of days before. Also making gravy ahead of time really allows the flavours to develop and gives a better sauce.

TIP: To make sure you achieve a good quantity of drippings (enough to help you out with your Yorkshire puddings and gravy) I pour a generous amount of olive oil over my joint or bird before roasting. The more olive oil means the more meat flavoured fat at the end of the roast.

How do I make gravy without meat drippings?

It’s easy. Maybe your meat didn’t produce very much or maybe you are making a veggie gravy. If you don’t have drippings or not enough then sub in some unsalted butter or ghee instead. For vegans, use vegan butter.

What can I use to thicken gluten-free gravy?

When I first became gluten-free and tried making gravy using a generic gluten-free flour I was disappointed, thinking that I would never again be able to enjoy gravy the same way. This gravy was thin and granular and lacked lustre. After a lot of experimentation I found the best flour to use is sweet rice flour. Sweet rice flour is absolutely essential to make a beautifully smooth velvety gluten-free roux and produce a sauce with a silky mouthfeel. It absorbs moisture very well so doesn’t clump and so is even easier to use than wheat flour. The flavour is pretty neutral with an ever so slightly sweet vibe which lends itself to the gravy perfectly.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How do you make gravy browner and richer?

In order to achieve a lustrous rich dark brown colour to gravy traditionally you would cook your flour and butter low and slow before adding the liquid so that the roux darkens to give flavour and colour to your gravy. However, sweet rice flour needs handling a little differently and I wouldn’t recommend this direction. Instead you can either use coconut aminos to lend its colour to the proceedings which works excellently, but you need a fair bit so you might need to check your seasonings. Or you can use the onion method as below.

Cook the onion in the drippings or butter for about 20 minutes until they are just starting to brown, but not at all burnt. Then when you add your sweet rice flour followed by the stock they take on this rich brown colour from the onions. It also gives your gravy further depth of flavour. You strain off your gravy at the end so you won’t get bits of onion in your gravy.

How do you make gravy without homemade stock?

So there are occasions when you just don’t have homemade chicken or vegetable stock to hand. At this point you have two options, you can either use fresh stock from the butcher or the supermarket but I find these tend to be a little bland or oversalted so go carefully with them. The other direction is to use whole milk. Yes, this does create a completely different beast but one that is worth experimenting with if you are caught out at short notice. This gravy is obviously creamier and richer but absolutely delicious. If I’m going down this latter route then I might also add a few garlic granules to help with the flavour. If you are dairy-free or vegan then you can also substitute with almond milk which I have done on many an occasion and it works just as well.

Gluten-Free Gravy

How do you add flavour to gravy?

If you are using the drippings from the meat and homemade stock then most of your gravy flavour begins right there. However, to help it along, or if you are subbing ingredients, do add a couple of bay leaves, some fresh thyme or even some rosemary to liven up the flavours. The gravy will also need a little sweetness to balance things out. You could use a glug of white wine or masala which makes for a very sophisticated gravy. However I like to use a bit of fruit jelly. Any good jelly works well here. Redcurrant jelly is easy to find at the supermarket and can usually be found with the condiments (not with the jams and preserves) or cranberry jelly which is lovely at Thanksgiving or Christmas.

How do you re-heat gravy?

Gravy thickens the longer it stands so if you are re-heating then it’s best to do on the hob in a saucepan and whisk in a little extra liquid (stock or just water would be fine).

It turns out that making good gluten-free gravy is easy peasy, especially if you have sweet rice flour in your arsenal. Many of the other ingredients can be subbed or played with depending on what you have to hand or the different dietary needs of your guests. The lovely thing about gravy is that it always tastes slightly different every time but always delicious. Go on, sneak back into the kitchen for that extra Yorkshire pud and gravy treat.

Gluten-Free Gravy

Print Recipe
Gluten-Free Gravy
This Gluten-Free Gravy is deliciously smooth, rich and full of flavour. Here are all the tips and tricks to get it just right.
Gluten-Free Gravy
Course sauce
Cuisine British
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 50 g unsalted butter or drippings from roasted meat
  • 1 onion chopped very finely
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 800 ml chicken stock preferably homemade
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon redcurrant jelly* or apple jelly or cranberry jelly
Course sauce
Cuisine British
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 50 g unsalted butter or drippings from roasted meat
  • 1 onion chopped very finely
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 800 ml chicken stock preferably homemade
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon redcurrant jelly* or apple jelly or cranberry jelly
Gluten-Free Gravy
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter or dripping, then add the diced onion and heat on medium for about 20 minutes until they are starting to turn brown (but definitely not burnt).
  2. Add all the flour and mix with a wooden spoon until the fat has absorbed all the flour.
  3. Pour in about a quarter of the stock, then switch to using a whisk, stirring all the time to smooth out the lumps. Once the gravy is beginning to thicken then pour the rest of the stock in slowly, whisking all the while.
  4. Add the bay leaf, thyme and stir in the redcurrant jelly, bringing the gravy up to a gentle boil. If the gravy is too thick for you, add some more stock or just water to get to your desired consistency.
  5. Simmer for 15 minutes then remove from the heat and strain. Keep warm until ready to serve.

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overhead shot of Gluten-Free Cauliflower Cheese in a serving dish with a spoon on a wooden board with plates

Gluten-Free Gravy

Tahini Turmeric Dressing

Tahini Turmeric Dressing is bright, vibrant and full of flavour. Better yet it can be paired with almost anything from roasted veggies, salad, meat to potatoes or rice. It’s a supper saviour.

Tahini Turmeric Dressing

Since I am still avoiding sugar in the run up to the end of my pregnancy I wanted to use the opportunity to write about one of my most basic savoury kitchen staples and it’s this Tahini Turmeric Dressing. It’s such a life saver as I always have the ingredients to make it on hand and it can transform absolutely any supper to something ultra special and flavourful.

Tahini Turmeric Dressing

My meal prepping has gone a little bit by the wayside these past few weeks since I have just about enough energy to make a bit of toast. I really appreciate myself though when I make time to whip up a dressing on a Sunday which can be utilised the whole of the next week. Last weekend I whisked up my favourite Tahini Turmeric Dressing (yay me!) which really should provide no congratulations whatsoever as it was completed in under five minutes. However, I had to reach up high into the cupboards to find my elusive tahini, wrestle with a tin of coconut milk, pull out the blender, find a suitable jar to store the dressing in and wash up the blender. Really it was more like ten minutes. So quite strenuous for this very pregnant lady.

Tahini Turmeric Dressing

I was so glad I found the time to do it though as I’ve been reaping the rewards of making the Tahini Turmeric Dressing all week. The first thing I made with it was the Roast Cauliflower Salad recipe I’m sharing with you over the weekend which is my favourite way to eat it. However, I didn’t stop there. It’s fabulous drizzled over lamb chops, in lieu of mayonnaise in a potato salad and even stirred into a full bowl of finely diced cucumber to serve with roast chicken. It’s so easy and useful, especially if you are obsessed with tahini, like me, enjoy the colour and the idea of the health benefits that turmeric provides, like me, and love the zesty punch of the lemon. just. like. me.

Tahini Turmeric Dressing

The way I’ve made the dressing here in this recipe whisks up nice and thick so is ideal for a drizzle dressing for robust veggies, carbs and meat. However, if you want to dress it over salad leaves but are worried about it weighing the leaves down, or fancy a bit of a lighter effect then just whisk in more coconut milk. When the dressing is allowed to rest for a day or more in the fridge it thickens up so feel free to whisk in a bit more coconut milk at that stage too. If you are serving it straightaway then I love it as it is.

Print Recipe
Tahini Turmeric Dressing
Tahini Turmeric Dressing is bright, vibrant and full of flavour. Better yet it can be paired with almost anything from roasted veggies, salad, meat to potatoes or rice. It’s a supper saviour.
Tahini Turmeric Dressing
Course sauce
Cuisine British
Keyword dip
Prep Time 5 minutes
Servings
300 ml
Ingredients
  • 150 g tahini
  • 125 ml coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • juice 1 lemon
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
Course sauce
Cuisine British
Keyword dip
Prep Time 5 minutes
Servings
300 ml
Ingredients
  • 150 g tahini
  • 125 ml coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • juice 1 lemon
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
Tahini Turmeric Dressing
Instructions
  1. Pour all the above ingredients into a blender, food mixer and blend/whisk together until smooth. Or add into a medium sized bowl and use a hand whisk.
  2. Use straightaway or store for up to a week in the fridge.

SHOP THE RECIPE

To blend the Tahini Turmeric Dressing I used my trusty Vitamix® Pro750 Food Blender, Copper UK Model. It’s one of my most favourite kitchen appliances and I use it almost daily. This blender is amazing as it produces the smoothest smoothies, most cohesive sauces and fantastic soups. I have been using it most frequently at the moment for making my iced matcha lattes and of course this dressing and I now could not be without it. Okay, it isn’t cheap but if you have the budget for it and you are looking to be really spoilt then I really recommend it. Plus I love the colour!!

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Roast Cauliflower Salad with Tahini Turmeric Dressing

Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Tahini Turmeric Dressing

Blackberry Hoisin Sauce

This Blackberry Hoisin Sauce is beautifully sweet and tangy with so many layers of flavour and gluten-free to boot.

Blackberry Hoisin Sauce

Hoisin sauce is one of those mystery condiments where you are not totally sure what’s in it but you know it tastes good dolloped into your duck pancakes. One thing for sure is that most commercially made hoisin sauce contains wheat meaning it’s no good for me. I began making my own so I could still enjoy dishes like these amazing Crispy Duck Summer Rolls, one of my favourite recipes from the blog and to use in my stir-fries.

Blackberry Hoisin Sauce

This year though as part of my huge blackberry haul I decided to make my Hoisin Sauce with blackberries instead of plums or damsons. The result has been astounding. Luke claims it’s the best preserve we’ve ever made and he’s right it’s definitely up there. The complex layers of flavour in this sauce are obscene. The sweet tanginess of blackberries, the richness of the prunes, fresh heat from ginger and chilli and plenty of spice.

Blackberry Hoisin Sauce

Blackberry Hoisin Sauce

I love making ketchup and sauces for preserving, it’s one of the most satisfying jobs and so easy. For Blackberry Hoisin Sauce the ingredients are brought to the boil in a large pan, blended and sieved to achieve the perfect consistency then just placed back in the pan with the sugar and tamari (a gluten-free version of soy sauce. You can also use coconut aminos or if you are not gluten-free then soy sauce is fine), cooked until thick and luscious then bottled. It’s 1-2 hours work and worth every minute as the jars will last you all year and then some. Homemade Blackberry Hoisin Sauce is an excellent gift so you’re also sorted for a few Christmas presents, it’s nice to check things off early.

Blackberry Hoisin Sauce

We’ve been playing fast and loose with our Blackberry Hoisin Sauce and eating it with everything. When Luke went to spread some on his sausage sandwich instead of ketchup at the weekend I was a little taken aback but I needn’t have been concerned, it was amazing. Obviously you can use it in stir-fries, with your duck pancakes, in chinese salad dressings, as a marinade for chicken wings, barbecued meat. Practically anything. This will be the most used condiment in your kitchen in no time.

Blackberry Hoisin Sauce

Print Recipe
Blackberry Hoisin Sauce
Blackberry Hoisin Sauce is beautifully sweet and tangy with so many layers of flavour and gluten-free to boot.
Blackberry Hoisin Sauce
Course sauce
Cuisine chinese
Keyword blackberries
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
8x 200ml jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg blackberries
  • 125 g pitted prunes
  • 200 g red onions
  • 50 g garlic (10-12 cloves)
  • 100 g fresh ginger
  • 2 red chillies
  • 500 ml Japanese rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 piece star anise
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon schezuan pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 500 g light soft brown sugar
  • 100 ml tamari or coconut aminos or soy sauce if not gluten-free
Course sauce
Cuisine chinese
Keyword blackberries
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
8x 200ml jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg blackberries
  • 125 g pitted prunes
  • 200 g red onions
  • 50 g garlic (10-12 cloves)
  • 100 g fresh ginger
  • 2 red chillies
  • 500 ml Japanese rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 piece star anise
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon schezuan pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 500 g light soft brown sugar
  • 100 ml tamari or coconut aminos or soy sauce if not gluten-free
Blackberry Hoisin Sauce
Instructions
  1. Add blackberries, prunes, onions, garlic, ginger, chillies, vinegar to a large preserving pan.
  2. Bring to the boil, then turn down the heat gently to simmer for 20 minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat then add the spices and rest the sauce for 5 minutes.
  4. Blend the sauce in batches then sieve to achieve a beautifully smooth consistency.
  5. Pour the sauce back in preserving pan and add the brown sugar and tamari.
  6. Bring the sauce back to the boil until the sugar has dissolved then simmer for 15 minutes to thicken.
  7. Remove from the heat. Rest for 5 minutes then decant into sterilised jars*.
Recipe Notes
  • Inspired by the Hoisin Sauce recipe in Thane Prince’s Perfect Preserves
  • The sauce will keep for about 6 months if stored somewhere dark and cool.
  • *To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Seedless Wild Blackberry and Lime Jam

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Crispy Duck Summer Rolls

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