Cranberry Cream Pie

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie

Cranberry Cream Pie is tart and fruity with a buttery gluten-free biscuit crust, topped with whipped cream clouds.

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie

I have to be honest that the main reason I made this Cranberry Cream Pie was because I wanted some colour. Our house has a tendency to be a bit brown. There is original stripped wood everywhere; floors, doors, skirting, shutters, my bakers rack and our dining table. And that is just our living area. It definitely has a cosy relaxed feel (and by relaxed I mean messy) but it does crave colour. I love this time of year when the bright red and plush burgundy tones really ramp up the warm snug vibe we’ve got going on. And sometimes I need that colour to not just be present in the cushions, candles or Christmas decorations but in our glorious Christmas feast.

side view of a slice of Cranberry Cream Pie

It helps that Cranberry Cream Pie is not only the most stunning deep magenta but is also utterly delicious. This pie has it all, the looks and the personality. Zingy, creamy and crunchy.

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie

Cranberry Cream Pie has a thick biscuit crust, made from my favourite gluten-free oat biscuits and plenty of melted butter. The filling is so easy to pull together. just fruity fresh cranberries pureed and mixed with condensed milk, a spritz of lemon juice and egg yolks. It’s really just a wobbly cranberry custard. I used whipping cream to adorn this lovely pie as it’s a bit lighter than double cream and dissolves beautifully in your mouth. Of course use double cream or heavy cream if that’s all you can find. Whipping cream doesn’t see as prevalent as it once was.

I really like the idea of serving Cranberry Cream Pie on Christmas Eve this year alongside our Christmas Glazed Ham. The beautiful colours of the Christmas table lit by candlelight, with a vibrant taste to match, sounds incredibly appealing.

overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie with slice taken out

If you make this Cranberry Cream Pie then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own kitchen creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

side view of a slice of Cranberry Cream Pie

Print Recipe
Cranberry Cream Pie
Cranberry Cream Pie is tart and fruity with a buttery gluten-free biscuit crust, topped with whipped cream clouds.
overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie
Course christmas, dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword cranberries
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Servings
10-12 people
Ingredients
  • 450 g cranberries + 3 tablespoons water
  • 500 g gluten-free oat biscuits*
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • Juice ½ lemon
  • 8 egg yolks
  • 1 tin condensed milk 397g
  • 400 ml whipping cream
Course christmas, dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword cranberries
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Servings
10-12 people
Ingredients
  • 450 g cranberries + 3 tablespoons water
  • 500 g gluten-free oat biscuits*
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • Juice ½ lemon
  • 8 egg yolks
  • 1 tin condensed milk 397g
  • 400 ml whipping cream
overhead view of Cranberry Cream Pie
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 170°C/ 150°C fan/gas mark 3.
  2. Place the cranberries in a medium sized saucepan with the water and cook on a low heat for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally until the cranberries have broken down.
  3. Blend the cranberries until they are smooth then set aside in the fridge to cool completely.
  4. Melt the butter in a small saucepan and leave to cool for a few minutes just so the butter is warm rather than hot which helps your biscuit base from becoming too greasy.
  5. Whizz up the biscuits in a food processor then with the mixer still on pour in the melted butter until it combines with the biscuit to become a thick sandy texture.
  6. Press the biscuit crust into a 23cm pie dish using the back of a spoon and push the base up the sides of the dish.
  7. Bake the crust for 18 minutes then remove from the oven. Gently re-press and shape the biscuit crust which might have puffed up a bit and then leave to cool in the fridge to set whilst you make the filling.
  8. Turn the oven down to 160°C/140°C fan/gas mark 1.
  9. Mix the cranberries, lemon juice, egg yolks and condensed milk in a large mixing bowl.
  10. Pour the cranberry filling into pie shell, smoothing out the top.
  11. Bake the pie for 25 minutes, the cranberry filling should still be a little wobbly.
  12. Leave to cool and set in the fridge overnight.
  13. Whip the cream until thick and it can hold its shape then pipe over the top of the pie.
  14. Serve chilled.
Recipe Notes

*my favourite oat biscuits to use at the moment are Nairn's Oats & Syrup Biscuit Breaks. They are too yummy!

SHOP THE RECIPE

I would be nowhere without my Magimix 4200XL Food Processor – Satin for making the crust for this recipe. I have easily had it over ten years and I use it nearly every day for whipping up dips, pestos, nut butters, nut and oat flour and making my breadcrumbs. The Magixmix is an impressive piece of kit which even survived being dropped when we moved into our house (although it did have to have the motor replaced but that wasn’t too expensive). I put all the attachments in the dishwasher and they come out brilliantly clean but it also gives just great results. I love my Magimix and along with my Kitchenaid is the piece of equipment I use most often in my kitchen.

I bought this immersion blender when I began weaning Beau a few months ago and haven’t looked back. My big blender isn’t always appropriate when blending a small amount of food. Also these cranberries blend to quite a thick paste and I could imagine most of the fruit getting lost beneath the blades. This immersion blender is perfect. You stick it directly in the saucepan and your cranberries are blended in moments. I also liked the fact that there was still a little bit of texture – the blend is not 100% smooth. I like this Russell Hobbs Food Collection Hand Blender 22241, 200 W – White as it’s extremely affordable and straightforward to use.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Lemon Almond and Raspberry Trifle

This Lemon, Almond and Raspberry Trifle is a perfectly special way to end your winter feast. A gluten-free lemon and almond sponge is drizzled with limoncello, cosseted by a thick blanket of raspberry curd and topped with dreamy lemon custard and clouds of double cream. A crunch of toasted almonds and fresh raspberries are scattered to finish.

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Boxing Day Ale Chutney

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

This Boxing Day Ale Chutney is the perfect addition to your cheeseboard. It’s also particularly delicious with leftover Christmas ham or turkey. Sweetly spiced with chunky vegetables and plenty of tang.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day is definitely my favourite day over the holiday period. It has none of the high expectations of Christmas Day. There’s no early morning hysteria or panic because you forgot to put the turkey on/buy the Brussels/wrap Adrian’s present. I spend most of Christmas Day in the kitchen, rushing back and forth between filling glasses with Bucks Fizz, trying to be with the children for the opening of every present and shooing Billy Buddy away from the mince pies. It’s exhausting.

mid shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day has none of that palaver though. You can lie in, well you can if you don’t have children. It’s not frowned upon to have chocolate for breakfast as it’s technically still Christmas and all those Lindor Lindts have to be demolished before New Year. You’re free to spend all day watching movies, drinking the Bucks Fizz you didn’t really have time for the day before whilst wearing your new Christmas jammies. Plus you can eschew cooking for cheese, biscuits and cold cuts and the trifle that you prepared on Christmas Eve. At least that’s how I roll with Boxing Day and I will not compromise it for anyone.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

As anyone knows who has prepared a Boxing Day buffet for all the Christmas Day stragglers the accompaniments for your cheese and meats are so important. It’s all very well splashing out on decent stilton and the good oatcakes but since you are dumbing down the cooking aspect of it then the effort has to show somewhere so you can still wear your perfect host/hostess crown with pride. This is when preparing your Boxing Day Ale Chutney early doors in December will pay off dividends.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

I have been making this Boxing Day Ale Chutney for a few years now when I realised I needed a more everyman’s pickle to go with the cheeseboard. I had Courgette Relish and Stem Ginger and Apple Chutney but my family were clamouring for more of a ploughmans preserve. This Boxing Day Ale Chutney fits the bill absolutely. It’s simple to make since after only 15 minutes of chopping you just throw everything into a large saucepan to get to know each other. It doesn’t have a long cooking time compared to other chutneys, just an hour or two, and can pretty much be eaten straight away. However, if you decant into sterilised jars then it will also keep for a good few months, or until you open it on Boxing Day.

overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

Boxing Day Ale Chutney is beautifully chunky with root vegetables, sweet with tomatoes, dates, spices and gluten-free pale ale. It’s also tangy with cider vinegar and mustard so holds its own against strong cheese and robust meats.

The best thing is if you decide to get ahead and make your chutney now then you’ll have plenty of jars to give away as Christmas presents. Then all your friends and relatives can reap the benefit of your Boxing Day Ale Chutney too. I guarantee they will be begging for the recipe.

mid shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard

If you make this Boxing Day Ale Chutney then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you make the recipe or use it as a building block for another delicious creation, I’d also love it if you tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Boxing Day Ale Chutney
Boxing Day Ale Chutney is the perfect addition to your cheeseboard. It’s also particularly delicious with leftover Christmas ham or turkey. Sweetly spiced with chunky vegetables and plenty of tang.
overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard
Cuisine British
Keyword chutney
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 90 minutes
Servings
10 190g jars
Ingredients
  • 3 onions about 400g
  • 1 swede about 375g chopped
  • 2 large carrots about 300g carrots
  • 3 granny smith apples
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled and diced
  • 175 g dates pitted
  • 140 g tomato puree
  • 325 g light soft brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons black treacle
  • 300 ml cider vinegar
  • tablespoons mustard powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground mace
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 500 ml gluten-free pale ale
Cuisine British
Keyword chutney
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 90 minutes
Servings
10 190g jars
Ingredients
  • 3 onions about 400g
  • 1 swede about 375g chopped
  • 2 large carrots about 300g carrots
  • 3 granny smith apples
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled and diced
  • 175 g dates pitted
  • 140 g tomato puree
  • 325 g light soft brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons black treacle
  • 300 ml cider vinegar
  • tablespoons mustard powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground mace
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 500 ml gluten-free pale ale
overhead shot of Boxing Day Ale Chutney in the middle of a cheeseboard
Instructions
  1. Put all ingredients into a large preserving pot with 150ml water and 250ml of the ale.
  2. Bring to a gentle simmer, stirring occasionally, and cook for an hour.
  3. Take the chutney off the heat and pour in the rest of the ale.
  4. Return the chutney to the heat and cook for a further 30 minutes.
  5. Remove from the heat and decant into sterilised jars*.
Recipe Notes

This recipe is slightly adapted from Hearty Ale Chutney from Preserves: River Cottage Handbook No.2 by Pam Corbin The chutney will keep up to a year if stored in a cool dark place.

*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.

The chutney will keep up to a year if stored in a cool dark place.

SHOP THE RECIPE

I find my Le Creuset Signature Cast Iron Round Casserole, 28 cm – Marseille Blue absolutely indispensable when I’m making any type of preserve or indeed anything in the kitchen. It’s very heavy duty but I use it for absolutely everything from pot roasts, stews and stocks to making jams and chutneys. It’s large enough that it is great for so many purposes from sweet to savoury. I have the signature marseille blue colour as when I bought it I wanted it to match the old Le Creuset saucepans handed down to me from my dad but you can get them in other beautiful colours. Different colours are different prices so you can definitely get a good deal if you choose a less popular colour.


This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Courgette Relish

Courgette Relish on a wooden box with forks

Stem Ginger and Apple Chutney

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Cranberry Clementine Sauce

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Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce {gluten-free}

This Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce is a delightful alternative take on the Christmas Pudding. Still rich with fruit and spices but imbued with velvety pools of chocolate and the sharp sweetness of clementines.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

I hate to break it to you but this weekend is the last Sunday before advent. There is no denying it any more, Christmas will soon be upon us and in no time we’ll be scrabbling around on Christmas Eve desperately trying to wrap up all the stocking presents, brine the turkey and wrestle the children into bed.

Amid the present and meal prep chaos there is definitely one job you don’t want to be doing on Christmas Eve and that’s making a Christmas Pudding. Let’s face it if you haven’t made it by then it’s more than likely you’ll be swinging by Tesco before it closes hoping they haven’t sold out of all the gluten-free ones. There’s nothing like a homemade Christmas Pudding though. That’s why it’s best to get ahead and tradition decrees that the fifth sunday before Christmas is the ideal day for such a job. It’s Stir-Up Sunday people!

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

Stir-Up Sunday harkens way back to Victorian times and gets its name from the opening of the book of common prayer which is read on the last Sunday before advent ‘Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people’ It seems that the Victorians took the bible at its word and it soon became tradition to stir up your Christmas Pudding on that day too. And with good reason, it’s such a good idea to get it out of the way early doors. After its initial steam a Christmas Pudding can sit quite happily for weeks or even months and even tastes better the longer you leave it.

Christmas Pudding evokes such childhood nostalgia for me that a generous portion at Christmas is more than a delicious dessert, it’s like a transportation device to my past. I loved the Christmas Pudding our Auntie Lil always used to make us but I also have a fondness for the one we were served every year at school.

Christmas time at our school was magical. The whole school would sit at tables in the main dining hall, an ancient and creaking cavernous room, all wooden beams and pillars with a balcony high above surrounding the room where the older years would sit. Just after the Christmas Pudding was served the lights would be turned off so we were in pitch darkness. The room would fall silent, all 700 children, and a beautiful choral echo would be heard faintly from outside. As the singing grew stronger, our choral society would hover into the room, shrouded in capes, holding candles and singing haunting Latin carols. The memory of Christmas Pudding drowning in brandy sauce still in our mouths. Perhaps if we were lucky a faint metallic taste might be on our tongues as well which meant that we had been one of the hallowed few to have found a penny wrapped in foil in our serving. To be treasured indeed.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

My recipe for Traditional Christmas Pudding is usually the one I turn to every year and although I will never tire of it I fancied a change. So this Christmas I will be making this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce and I could not be more excited to share it with my family, it’s utterly delicious.

What I love about this recipe that even though this pudding is beautifully chocolately it is still most definitely Christmas Pudding and the flavours marry together so well. The teff flour, which is the gluten-free flour I chose for this recipe works so beautifully in support of the chocolate. There is so much texture in this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding, the molton puddles of chocolate chips give the pudding a softness, the dried fruit give a lovely chew with a final nobbly crunch from the nuts. And despite all the rich flavours going on, this Christmas Pudding is lighter than you think, it’s not stodgy at all. As long as you don’t let it sit after it has finished steaming and serve straightaway.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

The Cointreau Sauce is a nod to the brandy sauce we were always served at school and actually I think this may be my favourite accompaniment to the pudding. It’s adapted from a Delia Smith recipe for her Brandy Sauce and it is light and simple. The gentle flavour of the Cointreau Sauce lets the pudding speak for itself whilst providing the much needed sauce and a spicy after kick of Cointreau.

Also a little bit of advice on this recipe, I know we’re all about Stir-Up Sunday but since this recipe takes a couple of days to make you will probably want to start prepping on the Saturday. Stir-Up Saturday if you will. This means you can do the final bit of work and the big steam on the Sunday rather than the job bleeding into your working week.

Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce

If you do fancy ringing in the changes with your Christmas pudding this year then I urge you to give this Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce a go, and if you do then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you use this recipe as a jumping off point for your own twist on the Christmas pud then I’d also love it if you’d share your version and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce {gluten-free}
This Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce is a delightful alternative take on the Christmas Pudding
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours total
Servings
10 people
Ingredients
Day One
  • 115 g sultanas
  • 115 g currants
  • 100 g dried cranberries
  • 20 g mixed peel
  • 40 g whole almonds chopped up
  • 1 grated bramley apple about 250g
  • juice and zest 2 clementines + 1 extra for decoration
  • 50 ml Cointreau
Day 2
  • 2 eggs
  • 80 g fresh shredded suet*
  • 125 g chocolate chips
  • 115 g light muscovado sugar
  • 80 g gluten-free breadcrumbs
  • 80 g teff flour
  • 20 g tapioca flour
  • 25 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
Cointreau Sauce
  • 40 g butter
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 40 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 2 tablespoons Cointreau
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours total
Servings
10 people
Ingredients
Day One
  • 115 g sultanas
  • 115 g currants
  • 100 g dried cranberries
  • 20 g mixed peel
  • 40 g whole almonds chopped up
  • 1 grated bramley apple about 250g
  • juice and zest 2 clementines + 1 extra for decoration
  • 50 ml Cointreau
Day 2
  • 2 eggs
  • 80 g fresh shredded suet*
  • 125 g chocolate chips
  • 115 g light muscovado sugar
  • 80 g gluten-free breadcrumbs
  • 80 g teff flour
  • 20 g tapioca flour
  • 25 g cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
Cointreau Sauce
  • 40 g butter
  • 40 g sweet rice flour
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 40 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 2 tablespoons Cointreau
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Chocolate Chip Clementine Christmas Pudding with Cointreau Sauce
Instructions
  1. Mix everything from the Day 1 list of ingredients together in a large mixing bowl. Cover with cling film and leave to marinate overnight.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients from Day 2 and stir together really well.
  3. Butter a pudding basin, and slice the extra clementine, tucking the slices into the bottom of the basin.
  4. Fill the pudding basin with the pudding mixture then prepare the basin for the steam.
  5. Take a piece of greaseproof paper and lie a piece of foil on top, make a fold in the centre of both pieces which allows for more room for the steam to rise. Place these over the top of the pudding basin, with the foil on top, securing with string around the pudding. Trim off any excess paper and foil, you don't want them to hanging too low as otherwise they will soak up the water during the steam.
  6. Place a wire rack (or a folded up tea towel) into a large lidded pot, deep enough to cover the pudding. Then place the pudding on top of the rack.
  7. Fill the pot up with boiling water until halfway up the pudding. The water should not touch the greaseproof paper or foil otherwise they will soak it up and the pudding will go soggy. Place the lid on the pot and turn the heat on so the water is kept at a simmer.
  8. Steam for four hours, checking the water level occasionally and topping up if necessary.
  9. Remove the pudding from its pot then leave to cool. Once cool re-wrap the pudding in fresh greaseproof paper and foil and store in a cool dark place until Christmas Day.
  10. On Christmas Day the puddings will need a final steam before serving so repeat steps 6 and 7. However your pudding will only need two hours this time.
  11. Turn your pudding out onto a plate and serve with the Cointreau sauce.
Cointreau Sauce
  1. Melt the butter in a large saucepan then add the sweet rice flour.
  2. Pour in the milk gradually and bring the sauce up to a gentle boil. Add the sugar and continue cooking for about 10 minutes.
  3. Pour in the cream and bring the sauce to a low simmer.
  4. Finally turn off heat and add the Cointreau. Serve hot with the Christmas pudding.
Recipe Notes

*It’s just not possible to buy gluten-free pre-packaged suet so do speak to your local butcher about obtaining fresh suet. It will come in a solid block which you will need to grate with a bit of gluten-free flour so that it can evenly disperse throughout the mincemeat.

Cointreau Sauce adapted from Delia Smith's Brandy Sauce

SHOP THE RECIPE

I always use Callebaut Chocolate Dark 70.5 Percent Easi-Melt Buttons Callets 2.5 Kg in all my chocolate recipes. It comes in a big old bag but if you bake a lot then these chocolate pellets are simply delicious and so good to bake with.

There are a few brands of lovely teff flour that I like to use but for this Christmas Pudding I used yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Brown Teff Flour 1kg. It has a lovely taste and soft texture.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

I love my Cornishware Blue and White Stripe Pudding Basin 1.1L 40oz which I use for all my steamed puddings, it’s so beautiful and sturdy and is about to really come into its own as I make my Christmas Pudding in the next couple of weeks.

Bakers twine is super useful in baking and for securing your foil lid to your steamed puddings. I use Tenn Well 200m 3Ply Bakers Twine, Kitchen Cotton Twine Food Safe Cooking String Perfect for Trussing and Tying Poultry Meat Making Sausage DIY Crafts and Decoration (White)

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Gluten-Free Mince Pies

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

These simple Gluten-Free Mince Pies are made with the most flavourful sorghum and almond flour pastry and filled with Easy Homemade Mincemeat.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I waxed lyrical earlier on in the week regarding my love affair with mincemeat and all the different and festive ways you can incorporate this treasure into your baking. However, it may not have gone unnoticed that I haven’t actually posted any actual mince pie recipes on the blog. Like ever. Until now.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

To be honest most of the drama regarding making your own mince pies is around the mincemeat and once you have that under your belt then you just need to encase it in pastry. Yes, there are many routes you can go down with your mince pies, open topped, double-crusted, frangipane, brandy butter topped, orange icing. The list is endless. But there is plenty of time to get into all of that once you have mastered the pastry itself. Since I’m a gluten-free blog then I am all about the gluten-free pastry and I’ve been saving this glorious homemade gluten-free pastry recipe until exactly the right time. In my mind there is no better time than mince pie season (aka Christmas)!

This gluten-free pastry is actually just as easy to make as regular wheat pastry. The only difference is that it is slightly more fragile to handle so may need a little more care when rolling out. It also requires a couple of minutes extra to blend together your gluten-free flour mix so you can ensure your pastry has the right bind, flakiness and snap.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I can’t deny that this gluten-free pastry tastes absolutely incredible. I tested the recipe by making some plain pastry shells and they were so moreish, like tasty little biscuits. As in most of my gluten-free recipes the alternative flours pack in so much flavour. This pastry is more than just a vessel for holding your mincemeat, it has its own character and flavour profile to enhance your mince pies.

The majority flour used in this gluten-free pastry recipe is sweet rice flour which is needed to bind the ingredients together and add elasticity to the mix so that the pastry can be rolled out with ease. It has a near neutral taste so its role is mostly function. The flavour of the pastry can be sourced via the other two flours in the mix, sorghum and almond flour. The sorghum flour is incredibly tasty, think wholewheat flour, earthy and wholesome. The almond flour adds a mild nutty sweetness and both of these are a great match for the rich mincemeat. The fourth ingredient in the flour blend is ground flaxseeds which helps to further bind the pastry and also adds a nice bit of texture.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

Once these four ingredients are whisked together then you can pretty much continue the same way you would as regular pastry. I use the butter cold from the fridge, sliced as thinly as possible then rubbed with the flours to make rough shreds and add flakiness to your dough. Caster sugar is added for sweetness. Then 2 eggs and an extra yolk for richness. Bring your dough quickly together, with maybe a little ice cold milk if more liquid is needed to make the pastry cohesive. Then wrap your ball of pastry in cling film and keep in the fridge until needed. The pastry can keep up to 3 days, just bring it out 30 minutes to 1 hour (depending on how warm your kitchen is) before you would like to roll it out.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I have several mince pie tins but typically they have all been put into storage along with a bunch of my baking gear whilst we’re umming and ahhing about moving house. I had a mini meltdown when I realised this, which was obviously after I had cut out all my pastry rounds and the oven had been pre-heated and I was basically ready to go. However it turns out that a 12 hole regular muffin tin makes the perfect sized four-bite mince pies just as well. Your pastry rounds will only go halfway up the tin but this works out just fine. So you mustn’t despair if you don’t have a special tin for your gluten-free mince pies.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

I filled my Gluten-Free Mince Pies with the most delicious Easy Mincemeat this time round. If you fancy being a little bit daring with your mince pies then have a look at my Victorian Mincemeat which is inspired by traditional mince pies and uses actual beef mince along with the dried fruit, spices and brandy. That mincemeat is something special. You can’t taste that it is actually meat, it is just ultra flavourful with a wonderfully luxurious texture. If you want to go in the other direction entirely then my nut-free and vegetarian Cranberry Cointreau Mincemeat is glorious and is a family favourite. So vibrant, light and still incredibly festive. Your mince pies, your choice.

Gluten-Free Mince Pies

If you need a Gluten-Free Mince Pie recipe then you must give these a go, they are simply wonderful, and if you do then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you use this recipe as a jumping off point for your own mince pies then I’d also love it if you’d share your version and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Print Recipe
Gluten-Free Mince Pies
These simple Gluten-Free Mince Pies are made with the most flavourful sorghum and almond flour pastry and filled with Easy Homemade Mincemeat.
Gluten-Free Mince Pies
Course christmas
Cuisine British
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
18 double-crusted pies
Ingredients
  • 140 g sweet rice flour plus extra flour for dusting
  • 125 g sorghum flour
  • 75 g almond flour
  • 25 g ground flaxseeds
  • 125 g unsalted butter directly from the fridge
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs + 1 yolk lightly beaten
  • pinch of salt
  • 1-2 tablespoons whole milk very cold
  • 300 g mincemeat
  • 1 teaspoon egg yolk + 1whole milk whisked together for the wash
Course christmas
Cuisine British
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
18 double-crusted pies
Ingredients
  • 140 g sweet rice flour plus extra flour for dusting
  • 125 g sorghum flour
  • 75 g almond flour
  • 25 g ground flaxseeds
  • 125 g unsalted butter directly from the fridge
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs + 1 yolk lightly beaten
  • pinch of salt
  • 1-2 tablespoons whole milk very cold
  • 300 g mincemeat
  • 1 teaspoon egg yolk + 1whole milk whisked together for the wash
Gluten-Free Mince Pies
Instructions
Making the pastry
  1. In a large mixing bowl whisk together the sweet rice flour, sorghum flour, almond flour and chia seeds.
  2. Slice the butter very thinly and add to the flour. Then rub the mixture between fingertips until roughly shorn and crumbly.
  3. Whisk in the caster sugar and then pour in the eggs.
  4. Bring the dough together using a wooden spoon at first if you like and then your hands. If the dough is still too dry and crumbly then add a little extra whole milk.
  5. Turn the pastry out on to the work surface and knead very briefly into a ball until the dough is cohesive and slightly sticky.
  6. Wrap the pastry dough in cling film and place in the fridge for at least 30 minutes (or up to 3 days) until you are ready to make your mince pies.
Making the mince pies
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C.
  2. To make the mince pies, dust your work top and your rolling pin with extra sweet rice flour then roll your pastry out to 3mm thickness. The pastry will be quite fragile. I usually split the dough in half and roll out half at a time to save a lot of re-rolling.
  3. Cut your pastry using an 8cm pastry cutter and place each round carefully in the hole of a 12 hole muffin tin. The pastry will come up about halfway. Fill each mince pie with a heaped teaspoon of mincemeat. If you want double crusted mince pies then cut out further 6cm rounds for the lid and tuck on top so the edges of the pastry all meet.
  4. If you would like to decorate the top of the mince pies then cut out extra Christmassy shapes from the pastry and place on top.
  5. Whisk the extra egg yolk and milk to make a wash then brush over the top of each mince pie. Place in the oven and bake the mince pies for 10 minutes until they are golden. Leave in the tin for 5 minutes to rest then carefully remove each mince pie from the tin with a palette knife and place on a wire rack to cool. Wash and dry the tin then make your next batch.
  6. Store the mince pies in a metal tin. They keep quite well for up to 5 days but they are best on the day they are made.
Recipe Notes

SHOP THE RECIPE

The 12 hole muffin tin I always use and will thoroughly recommend due to its durability and ease of washing is the MasterClass 12-Hole Non-Stick Cupcake Tray / Baking Pan, 35 x 27 cm

I use these KitchenCraft Double-Edged Plastic Biscuit / Pastry Cutters with Storage Box (Set of 7) – White for cutting out my mince pies, scones, biscuits. Anything really. These are basic and great. Plus they can go in the dishwasher.

For brushing the egg wash on the mince pies I recommend using a silicone pastry brush. I use Zeal Silicone Pastry Basting Brush Cream, 20 cm and absolutely love it. It goes in the dishwasher and is so easy to clean plus doesn’t clump together like some bristle pastry brushes do. I also use it for basting my turkey and lots of other christmassy and baking jobs. Infact you might need more than one.

I do insist that you store your mince pies in not just any cake tin but one that is ultra christmassy. I love these Eddingtons Nordic Christmas Cake Tins Set of 3. They may only come out once a year but they make any kitchen super festive.

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If you like this recipe then you may like…

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

Mince Pie Cupcakes with Brandy Buttercream {gluten-free}

Mince Pie Cupcakes with Brandy Buttercream {gluten-free}

Pecan Treacle Tart

Pecan Treacle Tart

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

This Easy Mincemeat Recipe is exactly what you need when you are required to make homemade mince pies pronto. No resting time is needed, it’s a quick assembly job and the result is a supremely spiced fruity boozy mincemeat.

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

I simply adore mincemeat. In my humble opinion it’s the best thing about Christmas. Along with The Waitresses’ Christmas Wrapping, Hot Buttered Chocolate Rum and festive jumpers for Billy Buddy. Stir-up Sunday is coming up this weekend which is the traditional day to make your mincemeat (and Christmas pudding) for the season. It’s nice to get this job out of the way in November as it means you can have homemade mince pies at your disposal any time during the holiday period. Although if you are only using your mincemeat for a mince pie filling then you are missing a trick.

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

What is mincemeat?

A few centuries ago mincemeat was a way to preserve meat, usually mutton, without smoking or salting. The meat would be chopped very finely, aka minced, then preserved with spirits and spices and sugar. It’s more usual these days for the minced meat to be replaced with beef suet and dried fruit. Although if you haven’t tried mince pies made in the traditional method using this Victorian Mincemeat recipe then you really need to address your life choices.

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

Why do we eat mincemeat at Christmas?

The reason we eat so many mince pies over the festive season is all to do with the spices. It is thought that cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg were given by the magi to the baby Jesus and so mincemeat, which is abundant in these spices, has always traditionally been associated with Christmas. And I totally take umbrage with the idea that if mince pies were so nice then why do we only eat them at Christmas. Well, that’s why Eccles Cakes were invented. They are basically mince pies that we are allowed to eat all year round.

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

Why do you use beef suet in mincemeat?

Beef suet is the hard fat from around the joints and kidneys of the animal and it is favoured in mincemeat due to its richness of flavour and the silky way it coats the luscious fruit. However, it’s impossible to find gluten-free suet in most supermarkets. If your butcher is able to source fresh beef suet for you then that is the best choice. It will probably be provided in a hard block which you will need to grate with a bit of gluten-free flour to create little fat pellets which helps to evenly disperse the fat. Weigh the pellets out and then add to the mincemeat. The rest can be kept in the freezer or used in your Christmas Pudding. If you are finding it hard to source fresh beef suet or need a veggie or vegan alternative then you can substitute with grated coconut butter.

This Easy Mincemeat is a back to basics recipe. I made the unfortunate mistake of buying pre-made mincemeat for some recipe testing a couple of weeks ago and the difference between homemade and shop bought is extreme. The shop bought stuff is all sugar and no flavour. No wonder mincemeat has got such a bad reputation.

If you are time strapped but need some homemade mince pies asap then this Easy Mincemeat Recipe is the way to go. There’s no resting time required and it’s not necessary to cook the mincemeat out before filling your pies. Although if you are not using the mincemeat immediately then you should cook it out before storing. The suet and sugar will melt and coat and preserve all the fruit evenly and also stops the apples from fermenting.

If you are in the mood for planning ahead this Stir Up Sunday then I would recommend that you make the mincemeat ahead of time which will allow the flavours to mature. However, if it’s a choice between homemade mincemeat made twenty minutes ago or using supermarket mincemeat then homemade wins hands down every time, maturation be damned. Plus if you’re making it yourself you can pimp it exactly to your preference or ingredients you have to hand. Basically what I’m saying is that there’s no excuse to buy it in.

What can I substitute for the brandy?

You can substitute absolutely any alcohol for the brandy. Rum, Pedro Ximénez, Cointreau or even Amaretto are my favourites.

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

What if I don’t like mixed peel?

If you don’t like mixed peel then just leave it out, or substitute for a couple of tablespoons of marmalade. However, have you ever tried making your own? Homemade Mixed Peel has a vastly superior flavour and can be useful for a lot of your Christmas bakes.

Can I substitute in other dried fruit?

Of course! Anything goes in mincemeat. Chopped dried figs, prunes, cranberries, sour cherries. You can just swap in the same weight of an alternative dried fruit and away you go.

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

Why dark muscovado sugar?

Dark muscovado sugar is used here for its rich treacly flavour. However, if you want a slightly lighter mincemeat then you can use light muscovado sugar. Or if you only have in soft light brown sugar then use that.

Of course this Easy Mincemeat Recipe is the ideal filling for mince pies but if you need any further inspiration, look no further than the following recipes:

Bramley Apple Mincemeat Pudding

Bramley Apple and Mincemeat Pudding

Mince Pie Cheesecake Oat Bars {gluten-free}

Mince Pie Cheesecake Oat Bars {gluten-free}

Christmas Morning Mince Pie Muffins

These gluten-free Christmas Morning Mince Pie Muffins are exactly what you should be treating your family to Christmas morning. They are light, fluffy, moist and full of Christmas spice and cheer.

If you’ve never made your own then I urge you to give this Easy Mincemeat Recipe a try and if you do then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you use this recipe as a jumping off point then I’d also love it if you’d share your version and tag me on instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your creations and variations of my recipes.

Easy Mincemeat Recipe

Print Recipe
Easy Mincemeat Recipe
This Easy Mincemeat Recipe is a quick homemade supremely spiced fruity boozy mincemeat essential for mince pies.
Easy Mincemeat Recipe
Course christmas
Cuisine British
Keyword christmas, mincemeat
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
4 380g jars
Ingredients
  • 400 g bramley apples about 1-2 apples
  • 225 g seedless raisins
  • 225 g currants
  • 225 g sultanas
  • 240 g fresh beef suet
  • 275 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 50 g mixed peel homemade is preferable
  • zest 1 orange
  • zest 1 lemon
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 60 ml brandy
Course christmas
Cuisine British
Keyword christmas, mincemeat
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
4 380g jars
Ingredients
  • 400 g bramley apples about 1-2 apples
  • 225 g seedless raisins
  • 225 g currants
  • 225 g sultanas
  • 240 g fresh beef suet
  • 275 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 50 g mixed peel homemade is preferable
  • zest 1 orange
  • zest 1 lemon
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 60 ml brandy
Easy Mincemeat Recipe
Instructions
  1. Peel, core and dice the bramley apples into small pieces.
  2. Place the apple pieces into a large ovenproof pot with the rest of the ingredients (except for the brandy) and stir together until everything is well combined.
  3. If you want to make mince pies straight away then set aside about 300g and stir in a couple of teaspoons of the brandy. Let the mincemeat rest whilst you prepare the pastry and then you can fill your pies immediately.
  4. To prepare the rest of the mincemeat for storing put a lid on the pot and place in an oven pre-heated to 150°C /130°C fan/gas 2 for 1 hour.
  5. Leave the mincemeat to completely cool before stirring in the brandy.
  6. Decant the mincemeat into sterilised jars and store in a cool dark place for up to a year.
Recipe Notes

*It’s just not possible to buy gluten-free pre-packaged suet so do speak to your local butcher about obtaining fresh suet. It will come in a solid block which you will need to grate with a bit of gluten-free flour so that it can evenly disperse throughout the mincemeat. If you are vegan then I would recommend replacing with grated coconut butter but if you are not then I would urge you not to make the switch.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Victorian Mincemeat

Victorian Mincemeat - a traditional mincemeat made with real beef for the best mince pies this Christmas

Cranberry Cointreau Mincemeat

Cranberry Cointreau Mincemeat