Best Gluten-Free Blondies

Best Gluten-Free Blondies are a celebration of butterscotch and vanilla, studded with white chocolate and pecans.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

It’s taken me a while to get to a gluten-free blondie recipe which I truly love. Every so often I make a batch of blondies but I am usually a little disappointed by them. By their nature blondies are rich with butterscotch flavour but this can sometimes translate to a sickly sweet treat. Not so here. Thank goodness I persevered as these blondies I love. They charm with vanilla and have a delicious chewy but nutty bite.

However, without delay I want to let you into the trick to achieving the absolute best blondies so there’s no messing around and we get to the good stuff right away. The trick to these Gluten-Free Blondies is…

Coffee Powder.

The presence of a gentle hint of coffee powder seems to absorb the trappings of the sickly sweet blondie and balance it out, creating a blondie intense with butterscotch flavour without a sugar hangover.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

Stay tuned though as there are other steps, equally important, to ensure that these are the best blondies ever.

Brown That Butter!

Blondies need melted butter anyway to ensure their delightfully soft chewy texture so why not take it one step further. All you need to do is melt your butter a little longer than needed so that toasty nutty flavour develops. Your finished blondies will thank you for it.

It’s also necessary to use two different types of sugar here. It sounds a little bit of a faff but I do it in a lot of my recipes and it’s worth it. First we use light muscovado for its gentle molasses taste. We’re trying to evoke butterscotch here and light muscovado is the perfect choice. It also gives extra moisture to the bake so we’re leaning into the fudgey chew that we like so much. However, too much and we’ll have a sloppy blondie at the end of the day. The caster sugar gives a little bit more body to the blondie and a firmer texture.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

Gluten-Free Flours

Now we need to choose our gluten-free flours. If we’re looking for that butterscotch taste then there is only one contender. Oat flour. If you can’t tolerate oats then never fear, you can substitute with sorghum flour. However, if you can tolerate oats then go with them as their flavour was made for these blondies. We also need to add a bit of sweet rice flour to the mix, again the gentle flavour of sweet rice flour works well here. But we also need it for its starchy qualities, to help the blondie stick together and promote the chew factor. Finally a light touch of potato flour is included to balance out the two flours and help not make the batter too wet as it’s a hydroscopic flour.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

Add Ins

Finally we’re after some good add-ins. Blondies can be perfectly lovely plain but they are made even better with chopped white chocolate and pecans. We choose to chop our white chocolate into shards, some big some, small pieces. It’s a preferred choice rather than chocolate chips as some of the shards may melt into the batter during the bake which just tastes really good. We also keep some bigger shards for texture. A few chopped nuts in the mix work so well for taste and texture too and pecans are my preferred choice.

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

If you make these Best Gluten-Free Blondies then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

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overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board

overhead of gluten-free blondies on a wooden board
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5 from 1 vote

Best Gluten-Free Blondies

Gluten-Free Blondies are a celebration of butterscotch and vanilla, studded with white chocolate and pecans.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: American
Keyword: how to make gluten-free blondies
Servings: 12
Calories: 341kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 165 g unsalted butter
  • 125 g soft light brown muscovado sugar
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100 g sweet rice flour
  • 90 g oat flour
  • 35 g potato flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon coffee powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 100 g white chocolate chopped into small pieces
  • 75 g pecans roughly chopped

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan assisted/gas mark 4 and line and grease a 20cm square baking tin.
  • Brown the butter by melting the butter in a small saucepan over a medium heat. Once melted the butter will start hissing and cracking and forming little brown bits at the bottom of the pan. Wait until the noises start to subside and the butter smells toasty Remove from the heat straightaway and pour into a heatproof mixing bowl so it doesn’t begin to burn.
  • Stir the sugars into the butter, followed by the eggs and vanilla extract.
  • Sift the flours together, in a separate mixing bowl, with the baking powder, coffee powder and salt.
  • Beat the flour mix into the wet ingredients until completely combined.
  • Fold in the chopped white chocolate and pecans and pour the batter into the baking tin.
  • Bake for 30 minutes then leave in the tin to settle for 10 minutes.
  • Remove from the tin and leave to cool on a cooling rack before cutting into 12 bars.

Nutrition

Calories: 341kcal | Carbohydrates: 38g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 9g | Cholesterol: 58mg | Sodium: 122mg | Potassium: 176mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 23g | Vitamin A: 7.7% | Vitamin C: 0.1% | Calcium: 5.7% | Iron: 4.3%

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This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

This Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake is made with fresh caramelised pineapple and a touch of coconut for tropical flavour.

Overhead of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake with a pineapple and glass of caramel next to it.

Pineapple Upside Down Cake is the only thing Mum ever bakes and as such is the only cake I have ever baked with her, to my recollection. I have happy warm memories of it which Mum usually served as a dessert rather than a teatime treat. Often warm from the oven, the surface glistening with the golden pineapple rings and sticky from the caramel. She would serve it with lashings of custard and, despite as a child never liking pineapple, I always had a soft spot for this dessert. But like I say, it was the only one she made so I kinda had to if I wanted pudding.

To be honest, I am still on the fence about pineapple but thirty-something (very something) years into the game I actually might be coming around. Especially if there is caramel involved. Always if there is caramel involved.

Cut slice of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

This Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake is somewhat removed from my mum’s recipe and is definitely the teatime treat sort of a cake rather than a dessert. Even though you could obviously eat this cake for dessert. Any cake for dessert is good dessert. This cake still feels like the warm hug of home, although it does shy away from the Pineapple Upside Down Cake you might be more familiar with. That wasn’t my intention. I did originally want to pay homage to Mum’s delicious cake so I could make it for her birthday, which is just around the corner. However, once I started playing around with the recipe by swapping in some gluten-free flours and reading a lot of different Pineapple Upside Down Cake recipes, this final version is the one I fell in love with and wanted to add to the Pineapple Upside Down Cake canon. Jamie Oliver, I blame you for this as his Pineapple Upside Down Cake in his Comfort Food book definitely led me down my final direction.

Overhead of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake with a pineapple and glass of caramel next to it.

Coconut

The first key difference in this Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake will be the initial step you take as you make the recipe. The inclusion of coconut. It makes the cake the most delicious consistency, a little chewy but bursting with tropical flavour. Both desiccated coconut and coconut milk are included here for the perfect texture and taste. This was inspired by Jamie Oliver’s version.

Fresh Pineapple

The next difference will be the swap of tinned pineapple rings for fresh pineapple. The bright juicy flavour of the fresh pineapple was no contest. I find the tinned ones a little tasteless and too sweet. By using fresh you are amping up the pineapple vibe immeasurably.

Caramel

Rather than using just brown sugar at the base of my cake tin to encase the pineapple I actually made a very easy caramel and dipped the pineapple in the caramel. I love the plain brown sugar version but it was a little crunchy for my taste and the cake would sometimes fall apart at the edges after it had been turned upside down. The caramel holds everything together perfectly and ensures the cake is always beautifully turned out.

Side view of Pineapple Upside Down Cake

How To Arrange the Pineapple

The way that the pineapple is arranged in a concentric circle looks a little more finickity than pineapple rings but it looks more impressive than it actually is to arrange and also means you get more pineapple for your money on the surface of the cake. I used glacé cherries right in the centre and if you have homemade glacé cherries then all the better.

Gluten-Free Flours

Of course the most significant change from Mum’s original version to this Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake will be in the use of alternative flours. Here we use flours which will give something back to the flavour of the cake, rather than just being used for structure and texture. The main flour is sweet rice flour which binds the cake and gives it moisture and bounce with a delicate taste to give the coconut and pineapple a chance to shine. Next we have sorghum flour to give a tender crumb and lightness to the cake. Then finally a little potato flour to balance out the sweet rice flour so the whole cake doesn’t take on that gumminess that gluten-free cakes are infamous for.

Cut slice of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

Of course the ultimate test for this cake was when I served it up to Mum, the connoisseur of the Pineapple Upside Down Cake. Needless to say she loved it. It’s a bit different but all the better for it and she has requested it for her birthday.

If you make this Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

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Overhead of Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake with a pineapple and glass of caramel next to it.

Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake

This Gluten-Free Pineapple Upside Down Cake is made with fresh caramelised pineapple and a touch of coconut for tropical flavour.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 50 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: British
Servings: 10 people
Calories: 568kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

Coconut

  • 200 g coconut milk
  • 75 g desiccated coconut

Caramelised Pineapple

  • 1 ripe pineapple
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 50 g unsalted butter cubed
  • 8 glacé cherries

Cake

  • 225 g unsalted butter
  • 175 g caster sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 190 g sweet rice flour
  • 170 g sorghum flour
  • 50 g potato flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

Coconut

  • Pour the coconut milk and the desiccated coconut into a small saucepan and heat until just at boiling point then remove from the heat and leave to cool for 30 minutes.

Caramelised Pineapple

  • Line and grease an 8 inch x 4 inch round baking tin.
  • Trim the top and tail of the pineapple and cut away the skin. Halve the pineapple then remove the core by cutting it out in a ‘v’ shape. Slice the pineapple very thinly lengthways then set aside whilst you make the caramel.
  • Melt the sugar on a gentle heat in a large saucepan, do not stir but gentle shake the saucepan every once in a while to ensure even melting.
  • Add the butter, once it has melted, stir to combine then remove the caramel from the heat.
  • Tip the pineapple slices and the glace cherries into the caramel and stir so everything is evenly coated.
  • Line the bottom of the cake tin with the pineapple slices, overlapping slightly in concentric circles, the rounded side facing towards the sides of the tin. Leave a small gap in the centre of the tin to fill in with the glace cherries.
  • Drizzle the rest of the caramel over the fruit and set aside whilst you make the cake.

Cake

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan assisted oven/gas mark 4.
  • Cream the butter and sugar for a few minutes until light and fluffy.
  • Add the eggs one at a time, mixing until thoroughly incorporated.
  • Pour in the vanilla extract and the coconut mixture and mix in well.
  • Sift together the flours, baking powder and salt then mix into the rest of the ingredients until just combined.
  • Pour the batter into the baking tin, on top of the pineapple and cherries, smoothing the top
  • Bake in the oven for around 55-60 minutes until the sponge has browned on top and an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  • Remove from oven, rest for five minutes then carefully turn out onto a wire rack.

Nutrition

Calories: 568kcal | Carbohydrates: 62g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 33g | Saturated Fat: 22g | Cholesterol: 124mg | Sodium: 212mg | Potassium: 312mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 28g | Vitamin A: 15.6% | Vitamin C: 0.6% | Calcium: 6.4% | Iron: 10.7%

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This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Raspberry Doughnuts {gluten-free, dairy-free}

These Raspberry Doughnuts are gluten-free and dairy-free. Utterly moreish and tender of crumb with a bright fruity flavour.

overview of Raspberry Doughnuts

These doughnuts are dangerous. Doughnuts have been my most requested gluten-free recipe (along with pastry and bread – guys I’m working on them) and believe me, these doughnuts have been worth the wait. Back in my wheat-eatin’ days I had always been a fried yeasted jam doughnut gal but on a whim last year I bought a doughnut tin and started experimenting with it. I can’t deny it, I have slowly been converted to baked doughnuts. They are lighter to eat and quicker and easier to make. Although unfortunately they are just as moreish – if not more so. It takes about four bites to eat one of these doughnuts so it seems churlish to have less that two at a time. And no one will blame you either if you don’t make it to the icing stage, but start nibbling them as they are cooling on the rack. They are far too easy to eat and heavenly straight out of the oven. Dangerous.

overview of Raspberry Doughnuts with one plated up

How to Make Dairy-Free Doughnuts

Vegan Buttermilk

I didn’t intend to make these Raspberry Doughnuts dairy-free at all, it’s just that I ran out of buttermilk when I was testing the second batch and had plenty of almond milk hanging around the fridge that I could easily substitute. To replicate the buttermilk effect, which gives a delightfully tender crumb to the doughnuts, I just added some fresh lemon juice to the almond milk to sour. The results were pretty great and I didn’t notice any discernible difference in the two batches. You don’t have to use almond milk, any non-dairy milk will do the job. Or dairy if you’re happy with that.

Coconut Oil

For the third batch I thought ‘in for a penny in for a pound’ and switched out the melted butter that I had been using for melted coconut oil. Actually I really really liked this swap. It helped that by this batch I had also nailed down the right flour mix so the doughnuts were beautifully light and fluffy. So I stuck with the dairy-free version and think the clean and light taste of the non-dairy ingredients mean the raspberry flavour really gets to shine.

Pro Tip – I usually use refined coconut oil for my bakes as that means we avoid the taste of coconut. It’s a much cheaper product than unrefined organic coconut oil so there’s also that benefit.

overview of Raspberry Doughnuts

Gluten-Free Flours

We want a flour blend with a more neutral taste so that the raspberry flavour comes through so we use the following flours.

  • Oat flour is a lovely light and fluffy flour with a slight butterscotch flavour that works well but isn’t so overpowering that it blows out the raspberry flavour. Also it isn’t prone to the same grittiness that a lot of alternative flours have, like white rice flour and sorghum flour, so we keep a nice tender texture.
  • Tapioca Flour is used for the bind. It worked better than the sweet rice flour which just imparted too much flavour.
  • Potato Flour is used to round out the mix, for neutrality and help with the potential of a ‘gummy’ texture from using too much oat flour.

Close up of Raspberry Doughnut

How To Flavour Raspberry Doughnuts

Freeze-Dried Raspberry Powder is baked into the doughnut batter. These freeze-dried powders used to be my secret baking weapons but now happily they are stocked in a lot of supermarkets so we don’t have to order them online. You need to add a lot of powder, 15g. Do measure using scales if you can. I believe it’s about 3-4 tablespoons though.

Fresh Raspberry Icing amplifies the raspberry flavour. You can use frozen or fresh raspberries depending on the season. Puree the raspberries then sieve to remove the seeds. Whisk the smooth raspberry puree with icing sugar for the most vibrant and flavourful icing.

Close up of Raspberry Doughnut, broken in half

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If you make these Raspberry Doughnuts then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Raspberry Doughnuts {gluten-free, dairy-free}

These Raspberry Doughnuts are gluten-free and dairy-free. Utterly moreish and tender of crumb with a bright fruity flavour.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time8 mins
Total Time28 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: American
Keyword: baked doughnuts, dairy-free doughnuts, gluten-free doughnuts, raspberry doughnuts
Servings: 15 doughnuts
Calories: 209kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 240 ml non-dairy milk I used almond milk
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 60 g coconut oil melted and cooled
  • 2 eggs room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 150 g gluten-free oat flour
  • 80 g tapioca flour
  • 25 g potato flour
  • 15 g raspberry powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Raspberry Icing:

  • 125 g raspberries fresh or frozen
  • 190 g icing sugar
  • 1 tablespoon rose petals optional

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 170°C /160°C fan/gas mark 4.
  • Lightly grease the doughnut tin with non-stick cooking spray.
  • Pour the non-dairy milk and the lemon juice into a large jug and whisk together. Leave for five minutes for the milk to sour.
  • Whisk the caster sugar, coconut oil, eggs and vanilla extract into the jug and set aside for a moment.
  • Sift the oat flour, tapioca flour, potato flour, raspberry powder, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a large mixing bowl, whisking to combine.
  • Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients then pour the wet ingredients into it, using a wooden spoon to bring the batter together. Beat by hand until the batter is smooth and thickened.
  • Pour the batter carefully into each doughnut ring in the tin, filling to about three-quarters full.
  • Bake for 8 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven, leave for a couple of minutes for the doughnuts to settle then gently insert them out of the tin to cool on a cooling rack.
  • Wash the tin, re-grease and make the second batch, then the same again for the final 3 doughnuts.

Raspberry Icing

  • Place the raspberries in a medium sized saucepan and heat gently until the raspberries have broken down into pulp.
  • Sieve the raspberry pulp, discarding the seeds.
  • Mix the raspberry puree with the icing sugar until a thick icing has formed and spoon over the cooled doughnuts. Leave the icing to set for at least an hour and decorate with rose petals if you like.

Nutrition

Calories: 209kcal | Carbohydrates: 37g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 21mg | Sodium: 170mg | Potassium: 150mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 23g | Vitamin A: 1.9% | Vitamin C: 5.6% | Calcium: 5.7% | Iron: 4.7%

SHOP THE RECIPE

There’s no way around it. You do need a doughnut tin to make these doughnuts and the one I used is Wilton 6 Cavities Doughnut Pan, 6 x 1.5 cm, Steel Silver. There are only 6 holes so you will have to make your doughnuts in batches but since they only take 8 minutes to bake it’s really no bother. My doughnuts always turn out beautifully from the tin and I used it brilliantly from the get go.

For more information about oat flour and tapioca flour where to buy them and what brands I recommend please visit my posts dedicated to these lovely flours.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

 

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Raspberry Doughnuts

Banana Rum Caramel Cake {gluten-free}

Banana Rum Caramel Cake is a gluten-free sour cream bundt cake, spiked with rum. The whole cake is drizzled with a buttery rum caramel and sprinkled with banana chips for crunch.

Banana Rum Caramel Cake on a wooden board surrounded by banana chips

I love to talk about how gluten-free flours are not a hindrance to a good cake experience but can enhance it by the right choice of flour. Here is another example of a gluten-free flour being as important as the other ingredients in contributing to the amazing layers of flavour going on in this seemingly simple bundt cake.

Close up of Banana Rum Caramel Cake

Gluten-Free Flours

  • Sorghum flour is a natural fit for banana cake. Its mild earthy sweetness is the perfect balance of flavour here and pairs beautifully with the banana and rum. It is also a light fluffy flour so gives a lovely texture. Like all gluten-free flours it loves to keep the company of other flours, too much attention and you’ll suddenly notice its slightly grainy, crumbly quality.
  • White rice flour is used here for neutrality and filler
  • Tapioca flour is used for binding and texture.

Pro Tip – Mashed banana is used for extra binding power so we can keep our tapioca to a minimum. The banana also helps to mask any potential grittiness so the cake is outstandingly moist yet fluffy.

Banana Rum Caramel Cake on a wooden board surrounded by banana chips

I have a soft spot for a good rum cake and will never forget an old work colleague bringing a tin of rum cake to the office after his holiday to the Caribbean and I was instantly hooked. He even let me keep the tin that the cake came in. I’m pretty sure my reputation as the crazy cake lady was in full effect around the office at that time. I never really found a plain rum cake recipe which lived up to that but instead I developed this recipe around a lovely banana pound cake which I was making at the time and it has been my go-to rum cake ever since.

I say ever since but I haven’t tasted this cake in a few year as my original recipe used wheat flour and it has taken me a long long time to get the gluten-free version exactly how I wanted it to be. It’s here though and I’m as in love as ever with the final result. I have made it a couple of times this week and it feels like an old friend has come back into my life.

Banana Rum Caramel Cake on a wooden board

How to Make Banana Rum Caramel Cake

The first layer of flavour is the zesty lime which is whisked into the sugar to infuse the cake at its core. The overripe bananas give huge depth, the sorghum flour adds its own personality and the rich vanilla extract, fruity rum and tangy sour cream all work in perfect harmony to create the flavour of this glorious cake.

Homemade Rum Caramel

The final cake is drizzled with a rum caramel drip. Homemade caramel is so easy to make but intimidates many. It is only a ten minute job but does require a bit of concentration. I have burnt more sugar than I care to imagine through over confidence, answering the phone, starting to unload the dishwasher. You do need to stand over the saucepan, watching the sugar melt and giving the pan the odd shake of encouragement but as soon as it has melted you only need to add your cream, butter (and in this instance rum) and then you have your buttery rich sweet caramel. The rum makes it all the more special.

A slice of Banana Rum Caramel Cake

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If you make this Banana Rum Caramel Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Click here for instant access

Banana Rum Caramel Cake {gluten-free}

Banana Rum Caramel Cake is a gluten-free sour cream cake, spiked with rum. The cake is drizzled with a buttery rum caramel and crushed banana chips.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 30 mins
Course: Cake
Cuisine: British
Keyword: banana bundt cake, gluten-free banana cake, gluten-free rum cake
Servings: 16 people
Calories: 465kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 450 g caster sugar
  • zest of 2 limes
  • 300 g unsalted butter cubed, at room temperature
  • 240 g ripe bananas peeled and roughly mashed, about 3
  • 4 eggs
  • 160 g white rice flour
  • 160 g sorghum flour
  • 80 g tapioca flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 80 g sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 60 ml dark rum

Rum Caramel

  • 125 g caster sugar
  • 150 ml double cream
  • 20 g unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon dark rum
  • ¼ teaspoon pinch of salt
  • 30 g banana chips roughly chopped

Equipment

  • 10 cup/2.4 litre bundt tin

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160 fan/ gas mark 4. Grease and lightly dust with flour a 10 cup/2.4 litre bundt tin.
  • Place the sugar and lime zest in a mixer and blend together for a few minutes until the zest is evenly dispersed and a citrusy fragrance fills your kitchen.
  • Drop the butter into the mixer cube by cube, it will gradually cream together with your citrus sugar. When it’s all incorporated beat on a high speed for a few minutes until it’s very light and fluffy.
  • Add the eggs one at a time until they are thoroughly incorporated.
  • Add the banana into the creamed butter and sugar. Mix together, scraping down the sides of the mixer so it is all completely mixed in.
  • Whisk the flours together in a separate bowl along with the baking powder and salt and set aside.
  • Stir the sour cream, vanilla and rum together in a small jug.
  • Add the flours and sour cream mixture alternately into the rest of the cake batter in the mixer. Start with the flour, then the sour cream. The flour should be added in three additions, the sour cream in two and mix until just incorporated.
  • Pour the batter into the bundt tin, smoothing the surface.
  • Bake for around 60 minutes or until an inserted cocktail stick comes out of the cake clean. If the cake is browning a little too much on top halfway through the bake, dome a piece of foil over the top loosely to protect it.
  • Remove the cake from the oven, leave to settle for five minutes then loosen the top edges of the cake from the tin with a small palette knife as those are the bits that tend to stick. Turn the tin upside down onto a cooling rack and remove.
  • Leave the cake to cool completely on the cooling rack.

Rum Caramel

  • Tip the caster sugar into a small saucepan and heat on a medium temperature until the sugar melts. Do not touch with a spoon but you can encourage the melting by swirling the actual saucepan around occasionally if you like.
  • Carefully stir in the double cream and butter once the sugar has melted. The caramel may harden slightly but just keep on stirring the bubbly mixture until the cream, butter and sugar are smooth and liquid.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the rum and salt.
  • Pour into a heatproof bowl and chill for a couple of hours until the caramel has thickened up slightly. If the caramel is too thick to pour then stir gently over heat to melt it a little.
  • Spoon the caramel evenly over the top of the cake then sprinkle over the banana chips.

Nutrition

Calories: 465kcal | Carbohydrates: 61g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 22g | Saturated Fat: 13g | Cholesterol: 99mg | Sodium: 135mg | Potassium: 186mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 38g | Vitamin A: 14.8% | Vitamin C: 1.8% | Calcium: 4.7% | Iron: 3.9%

SHOP THE RECIPE

For this cake I used Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Sorghum Flour 500 g (Pack of 4) which is very easy to get hold of at a lot of organic, health food shops or Ocado and of course Amazon.

I used Freee by Doves Farm Gluten Free Rice Flour 1kg (Pack of 5) which is also very easy to get hold of and can be found in most major supermarkets in the gluten-free aisle.

The tapioca flour I used is again Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s a lovely quality flour and it’s good value through Amazon.

I treated myself recently to this Nordic Ware 85777 Brilliance Bundt Pan and it’s as wonderful as my other Nordicware bundt tins. If you lightly grease it and dust with a bit of flour, tapping out the excess before adding your cake batter then you will have no trouble removing your cake. It’s so satisfying to see that beautiful pattern once the cake has turned out successfully.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

 

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Banana Rum Caramel Cake

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands {gluten-free}

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands are gluten-free and deliciously light and nutty, drizzled with a zingy blood orange icing.

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box

Friands are lovely light little cakes, usually made from ground almonds, icing sugar, melted butter, a little flour and egg whites. They are incredibly quick and easy to make and the best thing is that you can pretty much grab any friand recipe and adapt it to become gluten-free with minimal effort and no compromises. This is because friands don’t actually require a lot of flour anyway since their main structure comes from ground nuts, usually almonds. You then suffer no losses if you switch up the flour for any flour of your choice, even the regular gluten-free flour which can be found in any supermarket.

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box with a few next to it

I have had great success using all manner of gluten-free flours in place of the regular wheat flour in friands but I have found buckwheat flour is the absolute perfect choice in these Blood Orange Hazelnut Buckwheat Friands. Buckwheat is a delightful gluten-free flour (no wheat involved despite it’s confusing name) and has a wonderfully earthy wholegrain flavour which pairs beautifully with the sweetness of the hazelnuts and wholesome citrus vibe of the blood oranges.

overview of Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box

A traditional friand is made with ground almonds sitting alongside the flour, but I have switched them up for hazelnuts which are just gorgeous here. You will probably have to grind the hazelnuts yourself, so go with the regular blanched hazelnuts and just pulse them in a food processor until they are as fine as possible before they start releasing their oils (only a minute or so). You’ll probably find they come out a little nubby but it just adds to the texture of these friands.

overview of Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box

A friand usually requires melted butter in the batter but this recipe has gone one step further and made browned butter. All you need to do is melt your butter a little longer than you would normally so that the milk solids turn brown, almost caramelising them. The result is a deliciously nutty flavour which adds another layer to these friands. I have to say there is a lot going on here but the flour choice, the change up of the nuts, the sparky warmth of the orange zest and now the nutty butter all come together perfectly. These Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands are such a special tea time treat. Let no one tell you gluten-free baking has to be boring.

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box with a few next to it

Unless you make a lot of friands so have made the investment then it is unlikely you have a friand tin. I love my tin and use it a lot but you certainly don’t have to get one, you could just use a regular muffin tin instead.

close up of a Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands split in half

REMEMBER TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE FROM THE LARDER NEWSLETTER FOR EXCLUSIVE RECIPES, UPDATES AND LOADS OF GLUTEN-FREE LINKS PLUS RECEIVE ALL THE LATEST RECIPES DELIVERED INTO YOUR INBOX!

If you make these Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own cake creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

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Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box with a few next to it

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands {gluten-free}

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands are gluten-free and deliciously light and nutty, drizzled with a zingy blood orange icing.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Afternoon Tea
Cuisine: Australian
Keyword: blood orange buckwheat friands, gluten-free friands
Servings: 12 friands
Calories: 346kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 150 g unsalted butter
  • 250 g icing sugar
  • 115 g buckwheat flour
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 100 g ground hazelnuts + 20g extra to decorate
  • zest 1 blood orange
  • 290 g egg whites about 8

Blood Orange Icing

  • 240 g icing sugar
  • juice of 1 blood orange
  • 1 blood orange to decorate

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas mark 4 and grease a 12 hole friand tin.
  • Place the butter in a saucepan and heat over a medium flame. The butter will melt. Listen carefully and the butter will start hissing and cracking and forming little brown bits at the bottom of the pan. You want to wait until the noises start to subside, the butter smells toasty and is turning a darker colour. Remove from the heat as soon as it gets to this stage so it doesn’t begin to burn. Pour the butter into a heatproof container and set aside to cool for 5 minutes, you don’t want it too hot when you add to the rest of the ingredients.
  • Sift together the buckwheat flour, icing sugar, baking powder and salt.
  • Stir in the ground hazelnuts and the blood orange zest.
  • Pour in the browned butter and stir until completely combined.
  • Whisk the egg whites in a separate clean bowl until light and foamy.
  • Fold the egg whites into the rest of the batter until combined.
  • Divide the batter between the friand moulds then bake for 25 minutes.
  • Leave to cool in the tins for 10 minutes then turn out and finish cooling on a wire rack.
  • Make the icing by beating together the blood orange juice gradually with the icing sugar until the icing is just pourable. If the icing is a little thick then add a drop or two of water to achieve the right consistency.
  • Spoon the icing over the cooled friands. Sprinkle over the extra ground hazelnuts and decorate with a segment of blood orange and leave to set.

Notes

Recipe adapted from Coffee and Walnut Financiers in Sweet by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh (amazon affiliate link)

Nutrition

Calories: 346kcal | Carbohydrates: 49g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Cholesterol: 26mg | Sodium: 140mg | Potassium: 139mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 40g | Vitamin A: 6.2% | Vitamin C: 0.4% | Calcium: 3.8% | Iron: 4.8%

SHOP THE RECIPE

I use this KitchenCraft MasterClass 12-Hole Non-Stick Friand Tin, 35.5 x 26.5 cm to make my friands. The tin is extremely hard wearing and it’s very easy to get the friands out. Just wobble the edges with a small palette knife and you can more or less just slip your friands straight out of the tin.

Speaking of small palette knives, I use this little guy Dexam Spatula with Wooden Handle 10.5cm in almost all my baking – there is usually a need for him. Like in this case, easing my friands out of my tin. You really can’t use any other implement as it won’t damage the cake tin or cut into the friands at all. I also use it for icing cupcakes, large cakes, releasing almost all cakes out of their cake tins. Because it’s not that big it’s easier to wield with more control than a larger palette knife.

For these friands I used Wholefood Earth Organic Buckwheat Flour, 1 kg which is a really lovely brand of buckwheat flour. It’s a very softly textured flour which really helped lighten up these little friands.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Apple Cinnamon Ricotta Friands

Some Apple Cinnamon Ricotta Friands sitting on a wire rack next to a bowl of caramelised apples

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gooseberry friands on a napkin on a wooden table

Blood Orange Rosemary Polenta Cake

 

This Blood Orange Rosemary Polenta Cake is both gluten-free and dairy-free. Whole oranges are boiled then pureed to create an incredibly moist and intensely citrusy cake spiked with a hint of rosemary.

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake {refined sugar-free, gluten-free}

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake is refined sugar-free and gluten-free and so full of flavour. Filled with a blueberry chia jam and covered in a maple swiss meringue buttercream.

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a wooden board surrounded by flowers

If you had a slice of this cake with no pre-amble or forewarning I guarantee you would be shocked to discover that this Apple Blueberry Maple Cake is made with absolutely no refined sugar. There is sweetness, of course, this is still cake. The sweetness though comes from potassium and fibre rich medjool dates, unsweetened apple sauce and just a splash of maple syrup. These three sources of ‘sugar’ are not just chosen for sweetness but for flavour too. The tanginess of the apples combined with the rich dates and mellow maple syrup give a complexity to the cake which you just don’t get with regular old caster sugar. Plus it is a healthier choice. Although, this is no health food as again, cake is cake. It is a treat, but perhaps a more justifiable one if you are enjoying a ‘sugar-free’ January.

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a wooden board surrounded by flowers

The Blueberry Chia Jam which sandwiches the two cake layers together is also refined sugar-free and is freshly made. I adore blueberry jam and I think actually this may be my favourite way to have it as it’s beautifully soft, not tooth-achingly sweet. The ground chia seeds are used to set the jam so you only need a minimal amount of maple syrup just to bring out the flavour of the blueberries.

A bite taken from a slice of Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a plate in front of the cake

Now, the Maple Swiss Meringue Buttercream, I am not going to kid you, is a little more tricky than regular old swiss meringue buttercream. It’s worth cracking though because the results are sublime. You shouldn’t have any problems if you stick to the exact method I’ve outlined in the recipe but you do really need a sugar thermometer to ensure the temperature of your meringue is correct. Maple syrup is a little more unstable than refined sugar so your buttercream may veer a little off piste if you’re not careful. However, swiss meringue buttercream is incredibly forgiving and it can always be rescued even if you think your buttercream is too soupy or if it is too greasy and the buttercream is just not coming together.

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a wooden board surrounded by flowers

My swiss meringue buttercream is too soupy

This means that the butter was too warm when you added it or your meringue hadn’t cooled properly to the right temperature before adding your butter. If this is the case then place your mixing bowl in the fridge for 10-15 minutes to chill. Bring out and beat again until smooth.

My swiss meringue buttercream is curdled or greasy

Your butter might have been too cold when you added it. You can either keep on mixing and hopefully the butter will warm up and start emulsifying with the meringue. If not then warm the sides of the mixing bowl by placing over the top of a saucepan of warm water. The butter should melt slightly around the edges of the mixing bowl. Remove from the heat and beat again, hopefully your buttercream will come together.

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a wooden board surrounded by flowers

Most importantly with any swiss meringue buttercream, be patient and don’t get spooked by a curdled looking buttercream. You have probably done nothing wrong and just may need to keep on beating until it comes together and forms the most delicious smooth and fluffy buttercream.

A slice of Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a plate in front of the cake

The other great thing about this cake is that it is also gluten-free. It uses a flour blend of oat flour, sweet rice flour, potato flour and tapioca flour. I love the oat flour for its unsurpassable butterscotch flavour which goes so perfectly with this cake but if you find oats don’t agree with you then you can substitute for sorghum flour. The taste of the cake will be different but still delicious. The sweet rice flour binds the cake together, mimicking the gluten-effects of wheat and gives the cake bounce. The potato flour is used to give the cake lightness and the tapioca flour is used for fluffiness and extra binding.

A slice of Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a plate in front of the cake

REMEMBER TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE FROM THE LARDER NEWSLETTER FOR EXCLUSIVE RECIPES, UPDATES AND LOADS OF GLUTEN-FREE LINKS PLUS RECEIVE ALL THE LATEST RECIPES DELIVERED INTO YOUR INBOX!

If you make Apple Blueberry Maple Cake then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own cake creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

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Apple Blueberry Maple Cake on a wooden board surrounded by flowers

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake {refined sugar-free, gluten-free}

Apple Blueberry Maple Cake is refined sugar-free and gluten-free and so full of flavour. Filled with a blueberry chia jam and covered in a maple swiss meringue buttercream.
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time2 hrs
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Keyword: apple blueberry cake recipe, apple blueberry maple cake, gluten-free apple cake
Servings: 16 people
Calories: 568kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 200 g gluten-free oat flour
  • 160 g sweet rice flour
  • 45 g potato flour
  • 45 g tapioca flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 240 g medjool dates about 16, pitted and roughly chopped
  • 120 ml boiling water
  • 300 g unsweetened apple sauce*
  • 120 ml olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 4 eggs

Blueberry Chia Jam

  • 200 g blueberries + extra for decorating
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds

Maple Swiss Meringue Buttercream

  • 8 egg whites 240g
  • 400 g maple syrup
  • 500 g unsalted butter at room temperature, cubed
  • A pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas mark 4. Grease and line two 8 inch round cake tins.
  • In a medium bowl, whisk together the oat flour, sweet rice flour, tapioca flour and potato flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon then set aside.
  • Place the dates and the boiling water in a small food processor or mini blender and blitz until completely smooth, scraping down the sides as and when you need to.
  • Pour the apple sauce, olive oil, maple syrup, vanilla extract and date paste into a large separate mixing bowl or stand mixer and beat until completely combined.
  • Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after every addition.
  • Mix in the dry ingredients, one third at a time to ensure it has all mixed in evenly.
  • Divide the mixture between the two cake tins and bake in the oven for 30 minutes or until an inserted cocktail stick comes out clean.
  • Turn out the cakes and cool on wire racks before filling with the jam and covering with buttercream.

Blueberry Chia Jam

  • Place all the ingredients, except for the chia seeds in a small saucepan and cook on a low heat for 5-10 minutes until the blueberries have broken down.
  • Blend the blueberry mixture a little bit, you don’t want it too smooth but a little bit pulpy.
  • Pour the blueberries into a small bowl and stir in the chia seeds until combined. Place in the fridge for an hour to set.

Maple Swiss Meringue Buttercream

  • Heat the egg whites and maple syrup in a bain marie, stirring constantly until the temperature has reached 71°C.
  • Remove from the heat and pour into a stand mixer with a whisk attachment. Whisk until the mixture forms stiff peaks and the temperature has reduced to about 32°C.
  • Change the attachment to a paddle attachment. On a low speed add the butter slowly cube by cube. When you have almost added all the butter the mixture will look curdled. Do not fret – this is supposed to happen and just means you are nearly done, just continue to add all the butter. Once the butter is totally incorporated the buttercream will miraculously become a smooth velvety consistency.
  • Add the salt, and vanilla extract and mix until thoroughly combined.

Assembly

  • The sponges often come out of the oven slightly domed and so to make the cake assembly easier I often trim the very top of the dome off each layer so they have a flatter surface to work on. Don’t trim too much or you will lose a lot of cake.
  • Place one of the sponge layers on an 8 inch cake board and pipe a circle of buttercream at the very edge of the surface of the cake to act like a dam for the blueberry jam.
  • Spread three-quarters of the blueberry jam on top of the sponge, right to the edges of the buttercream dam.
  • Place the second sponge layer on top and cover the top and the sides of the cake with the buttercream.
  • Reserve a little of the buttercream to mix with the leftover blueberry jam to pipe around the top of the cake for decoration.*
  • Decorate with extra blueberries.

Notes

*to make the apple sauce you need about 6-7 apples (I used braeburn). Peel, de-core and roughly chop them. Place them in a saucepan with a few tablespoons of water and cook on low-medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the apples have cooked down to a thick pulp. I blended them once they were completely soft to ensure a smooth consistency. Weigh out 300g of the sauce for the recipe.
Inspired by Snixy Kitchen's Banana Date Cake

Nutrition

Calories: 568kcal | Carbohydrates: 58g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 35g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Cholesterol: 108mg | Sodium: 193mg | Potassium: 406mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 32g | Vitamin A: 17.5% | Vitamin C: 2.3% | Calcium: 10.8% | Iron: 6.7%

SHOP THE RECIPE

It’s not easy to buy certified gluten-free sweet rice flour in the UK, for some reason Bob’s Red Mill is astronomically expensive. However I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

Oat flour can be picked up at most health food shops and if I run out that’s where I head to. However, like all alternative flours it can be expensive so I find the most economical way is to buy it online. I go through bags of the stuff as it’s the flour I use most regularly so I like to buy in bulk. My favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4) at a reasonable price. Even better if you go the subscribe and save option.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

For the ground chia seeds I use Linwoods Milled Chia Seed, 200g which I love and you can get almost anywhere.

The cake tins I always use are these PME Anodised Aluminium Round Cake Pan 8 x 4-Inch Deep which are wonderful as they have completely straight sides so your cakes will be beautifully neat, the anodised aluminium means the heat disperses evenly throughout the cake without cooking the sides too quickly, which some darker cake tins do. The cakes slip out of the tins easily and they come in all the sizes you would need, although typically I use the 8 inch tins.

For checking the temperature of your meringue when making your swiss meringue buttercream don’t be without a Classic SuperFast Thermapen 3 professional food thermometer in grey colour It gives quick and accurate temperature readings meaning you can don’t have to guess at any temperatures when making candy, caramel or fancy buttercreams. I use mine all the time.

One piece of equipment I couldn’t do without when decorating layer cakes is this PME Tilting Turntable 14 x 23 cm. It has a super grippy surface so the cake board clings tightly to it. It also tilts which is great for when you want to add things like chocolate chips or sprinkles to the sides of the cake. I have had this cake decorating turntable for years and years and I absolutely love it.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

If you like this recipe then you may like…

Best Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake {without xanthan gum}

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Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffle Torte {refined sugar-free}

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