Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands {gluten-free}

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands are gluten-free and deliciously light and nutty, drizzled with a zingy blood orange icing.

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box

Friands are lovely light little cakes, usually made from ground almonds, icing sugar, melted butter, a little flour and egg whites. They are incredibly quick and easy to make and the best thing is that you can pretty much grab any friand recipe and adapt it to become gluten-free with minimal effort and no compromises. This is because friands don’t actually require a lot of flour anyway since their main structure comes from ground nuts, usually almonds. You then suffer no losses if you switch up the flour for any flour of your choice, even the regular gluten-free flour which can be found in any supermarket.

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box with a few next to it

I have had great success using all manner of gluten-free flours in place of the regular wheat flour in friands but I have found buckwheat flour is the absolute perfect choice in these Blood Orange Hazelnut Buckwheat Friands. Buckwheat is a delightful gluten-free flour (no wheat involved despite it’s confusing name) and has a wonderfully earthy wholegrain flavour which pairs beautifully with the sweetness of the hazelnuts and wholesome citrus vibe of the blood oranges.

overview of Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box

A traditional friand is made with ground almonds sitting alongside the flour, but I have switched them up for hazelnuts which are just gorgeous here. You will probably have to grind the hazelnuts yourself, so go with the regular blanched hazelnuts and just pulse them in a food processor until they are as fine as possible before they start releasing their oils (only a minute or so). You’ll probably find they come out a little nubby but it just adds to the texture of these friands.

overview of Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box

A friand usually requires melted butter in the batter but this recipe has gone one step further and made browned butter. All you need to do is melt your butter a little longer than you would normally so that the milk solids turn brown, almost caramelising them. The result is a deliciously nutty flavour which adds another layer to these friands. I have to say there is a lot going on here but the flour choice, the change up of the nuts, the sparky warmth of the orange zest and now the nutty butter all come together perfectly. These Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands are such a special tea time treat. Let no one tell you gluten-free baking has to be boring.

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box with a few next to it

Unless you make a lot of friands so have made the investment then it is unlikely you have a friand tin. I love my tin and use it a lot but you certainly don’t have to get one, you could just use a regular muffin tin instead.

close up of a Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands split in half

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If you make these Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own cake creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

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Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands resting on a wooden box with a few next to it

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands {gluten-free}

Blood Orange Buckwheat Hazelnut Friands are gluten-free and deliciously light and nutty, drizzled with a zingy blood orange icing.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Afternoon Tea
Cuisine: Australian
Keyword: blood orange buckwheat friands, gluten-free friands
Servings: 12 friands
Calories: 346kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 150 g unsalted butter
  • 250 g icing sugar
  • 115 g buckwheat flour
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 100 g ground hazelnuts + 20g extra to decorate
  • zest 1 blood orange
  • 290 g egg whites about 8

Blood Orange Icing

  • 240 g icing sugar
  • juice of 1 blood orange
  • 1 blood orange to decorate

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas mark 4 and grease a 12 hole friand tin.
  • Place the butter in a saucepan and heat over a medium flame. The butter will melt. Listen carefully and the butter will start hissing and cracking and forming little brown bits at the bottom of the pan. You want to wait until the noises start to subside, the butter smells toasty and is turning a darker colour. Remove from the heat as soon as it gets to this stage so it doesn’t begin to burn. Pour the butter into a heatproof container and set aside to cool for 5 minutes, you don’t want it too hot when you add to the rest of the ingredients.
  • Sift together the buckwheat flour, icing sugar, baking powder and salt.
  • Stir in the ground hazelnuts and the blood orange zest.
  • Pour in the browned butter and stir until completely combined.
  • Whisk the egg whites in a separate clean bowl until light and foamy.
  • Fold the egg whites into the rest of the batter until combined.
  • Divide the batter between the friand moulds then bake for 25 minutes.
  • Leave to cool in the tins for 10 minutes then turn out and finish cooling on a wire rack.
  • Make the icing by beating together the blood orange juice gradually with the icing sugar until the icing is just pourable. If the icing is a little thick then add a drop or two of water to achieve the right consistency.
  • Spoon the icing over the cooled friands. Sprinkle over the extra ground hazelnuts and decorate with a segment of blood orange and leave to set.

Notes

Recipe adapted from Coffee and Walnut Financiers in Sweet by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh (amazon affiliate link)

Nutrition

Calories: 346kcal | Carbohydrates: 49g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Cholesterol: 26mg | Sodium: 140mg | Potassium: 139mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 40g | Vitamin A: 6.2% | Vitamin C: 0.4% | Calcium: 3.8% | Iron: 4.8%

SHOP THE RECIPE

I use this KitchenCraft MasterClass 12-Hole Non-Stick Friand Tin, 35.5 x 26.5 cm to make my friands. The tin is extremely hard wearing and it’s very easy to get the friands out. Just wobble the edges with a small palette knife and you can more or less just slip your friands straight out of the tin.

Speaking of small palette knives, I use this little guy Dexam Spatula with Wooden Handle 10.5cm in almost all my baking – there is usually a need for him. Like in this case, easing my friands out of my tin. You really can’t use any other implement as it won’t damage the cake tin or cut into the friands at all. I also use it for icing cupcakes, large cakes, releasing almost all cakes out of their cake tins. Because it’s not that big it’s easier to wield with more control than a larger palette knife.

For these friands I used Wholefood Earth Organic Buckwheat Flour, 1 kg which is a really lovely brand of buckwheat flour. It’s a very softly textured flour which really helped lighten up these little friands.

This post is not sponsored but the images above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to use these link to make your purchases then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. I will only recommend products I use in my kitchen and love. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Some Apple Cinnamon Ricotta Friands sitting on a wire rack next to a bowl of caramelised apples

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gooseberry friands on a napkin on a wooden table

Blood Orange Rosemary Polenta Cake

 

This Blood Orange Rosemary Polenta Cake is both gluten-free and dairy-free. Whole oranges are boiled then pureed to create an incredibly moist and intensely citrusy cake spiked with a hint of rosemary.

Gluten-Free Scones with Quick Strawberry Jam and Clotted Cream

These Gluten-Free Scones are made with buttermilk and without xanthan gum but instead a delicious blend of alternative flours for depth of flavour. A perfect afternoon tea served with a quick strawberry jam set with chia seeds and thick clotted cream.

Side shot of a gluten-free scone filled with clotted cream and strawberry jam on a wire rack

There is nothing more indulgent than going for a proper afternoon tea. The kind you have in a fancy hotel with a proper tea menu, huge fluffy white scones, delicate cucumber sandwiches and mile high slices of sponge cake. I haven’t been for ages. Luke and I wanted to go as my last treat before Beau was born but then I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes so that plan was nixed. We should really put it back on the agenda now the newborn days are over. Celebrating the first few months of Beau’s life seems a pretty good reason to treat ourselves.

side shot of a stack of gluten-free scones

It’s the proper presentation of the scones which I find so alluring, perched atop the tier of sandwiches and patisserie, wrapped in clean white linen, waiting to be discovered. I always go for the scones first. If it’s a first class establishment then these scones will be warm, fresh from the oven and that is when they are at their absolute best. They must then be layered high with thick golden Cornish clotted cream and vibrant strawberry jam. Whether you slather your scone with the clotted cream or jam first will betray whether you are of the Cornish or Devonshire persuasion.

Overhead shot of a plate of strawberries, a napkin and gluten-free scones on a wire rack

The presence of scones will always elevate an occasion. A pot of tea shared with my mum is suddenly made into a fanciful affair by the inclusion of scones. We might as well be partaking our cream team with the Duchess of Bedford at Woburn Abbey. The proper china must come out, including the teapot, and I feel an unexplained need to set the table properly with a tablecloth and decant the jam and clotted cream into bowls rather than dipping our spoon into jars and tubs.

side shot of gluten-free scones on a wire rack

Yet scones also feel rather homely. They are definitely a comfort to bake. You don’t need an expensive food mixer or a specific kind of cake tin. Just a cheap mixing bowl, a wooden spoon and a standard round cookie cutter. You can dive your hands in, rubbing the butter with the flour in your fingertips, feeling the texture of the dough in between your hands as you bring it all together. It’s so satisfying and they don’t take long at all from start to finish. Within 45 minutes you can go from a faint craving to taking your first bite out of your homemade scone without any fluster.

Side shot of a gluten-free scone on a wire rack

Gluten-Free Scones with Buttermilk

I have a few scone recipes on the blog but no traditional plain gluten-free scones, the kind I turn to frequently when a cream tea is required. This gluten-free scone recipe is made with buttermilk for a tender crumb and a slight tang.

Overhead shot of a gluten-free scone with clotted cream and strawberry jam on a wire rack with a plate of strawberries and flowers

Gluten-Free Flour

For the flour choice in these Gluten-Free Scones I have used a specific home blend of alternative flours. I try and vary my gluten-free baking recipes with ingredients that are easy to find like the plain gluten-free flour blend you can pick up at the supermarket and those that indulge my love of alternative flours. It’s not going to suit everyone that this scone recipe uses a mix of five different flours but flour is the main ingredient in a scone recipe and has nowhere to hide amongst the other ingredients. To achieve a very good gluten-free scone the flour choice needs to be right.

I am aware that I have a very particular obsession with alternative flours and it is not usual for a larder to be stocked with every single variation on the market. However a few choice alternative flours are so worth investing in even if you are not gluten-free. Sweet rice flour, oat flour and tapioca flour are my mainstays. To understand the use of every flour in this recipe I urge you to read through my guide to Gluten-Free Flours. The depth of flavour you achieve from specific combinations is surprising and you can aim for a greater control over texture, moistness and fluffiness than just using a plain ready-made gluten-free blend can provide.

Side shot of a gluten-free scone filled with clotted cream and strawberry jam on a wire rack

Gluten-Free Scones without xanthan gum

This gluten-free scone recipe is also without xanthan gum, a regular presence in a lot of gluten-free baking. It’s often used as a thickening agent or stabiliser to help prevent crumbly and dry gluten-free goods. It’s not something I particularly publicise but I never bake with xanthan gum. I don’t find I can digest it very well so steer clear. Instead I achieve my texture in baking from the right blend of alternative flours. Again, hence the need for so many.

Overhead shot of a bowl of strawberry jam next to a bowl of strawberries and gluten-free scones on a wire rack

Quick Strawberry Jam

Of course you can use a good strawberry jam bought from the farmers’ market to cut down on your labour but a quick fresh strawberry jam is easy enough and has less sugar. These July strawberries I have been buying recently have been so delicious, absolutely full of flavour. I use lemon juice to perk up the strawberry taste, a dash of caster sugar and chia seeds to create an instant luscious set.

overhead shot of a bowl of clotted cream next to a bowl of strawberries

Clotted Cream

Clotted cream is a fabulous ingredient, I could easily eat it with a spoon but the golden hued crust that you have to break through to get there is the real chef’s delight. Clotted cream is the only choice for a proper afternoon tea. I remember being served the most delicious homemade scones once in Brighton, utterly ruined by the airy canned whipped cream served with them. It’s the clotted cream that really achieves the high end cream team that we all hope for whilst enjoying our fresh homemade scones warm from the oven.

Side shot of a gluten-free scone filled with clotted cream and strawberry jam on a wire rack

Gluten-Free Scones with Quick Strawberry Jam and Clotted Cream

These Gluten-Free Scones are made with buttermilk and without xanthan gum but instead a delicious blend of alternative flours for depth of flavour. A perfect afternoon tea served with a quick strawberry jam set with chia seeds and thick clotted cream.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time18 mins
Total Time38 mins
Course: Afternoon Tea
Cuisine: British
Keyword: gluten-free scone recipe, gluten-free scones, scones with strawberry jam and clotted cream
Servings: 9 scones
Calories: 562kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

Gluten-Free Scones

  • 175 g sweet rice flour
  • 125 g oat flour
  • 100 g millet flour
  • 50 g potato starch
  • 50 g tapioca flour
  • 100 g cold unsalted butter sliced thinly
  • 115 g caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon + 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs + 1 extra for glazing
  • 200 ml buttermilk

Quick Strawberry Jam

  • 500 g strawberries
  • juice 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • 250 g clotted cream

Instructions

Buttermilk Gluten-Free Scones

  • Preheat oven to 160°C/140°C fan/gas mark 3/320°F.
  • Whisk the flours together in a large mixing bowl then add the butter, rubbing together with your fingertips to create breadcrumbs.
  • Add the sugar, baking powder and salt and mix well.
  • Pour the milk into a jug and whisk in the eggs until just combined then pour into the centre of the scone mixture.
  • At first stir the liquid ingredients in with a wooden spoon then tip out onto a clean work surface and using your hands bring the dough together, turning and folding, until it is no longer sticky. Use a bit of extra gluten-free flour on the work surface if it is starting to stick.
  • Once you have brought the dough together into a ball, press it down into an even circle 1 inch thick.
  • Cut out the scones using 7cm cutter.
  • Place the scones onto a clean baking tray. Whisk the extra egg with a splash of milk and brush onto the surface of each scone, making sure not to let it drip down the sides, else your scones will not rise evenly.
  • Bake the scones for 18 minutes. Let the scones rest on the baking tray for 5 minutes then remove and let cool on a wire rack.

Quick Strawberry Jam

  • Hull the strawberries then place them in a medium sized saucepan with the lemon juice and caster sugar.
  • Cook for 10 minutes until the strawberries have broken down, then remove from the heat and stir in the chia seeds.
  • Chill until needed.
  • Serve the scones split open with the clotted cream and strawberry jam

Notes

These scones are best eaten straight away or a few hours after baking. They go stale rather quickly overnight.

Nutrition

Calories: 562kcal | Carbohydrates: 64g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 30g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Cholesterol: 107mg | Sodium: 175mg | Potassium: 439mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 20g | Vitamin A: 9.7% | Vitamin C: 39.9% | Calcium: 13.9% | Iron: 10.1%

SHOP THE RECIPE

Although the metal cookie cutters may look a bit more stylish I always use these KitchenCraft Double-Edged Plastic Biscuit/Pastry Cutters with Storage Box (Set of 7) – White. They are the perfect range of sizes, they are plastic so don’t rust and can go in the dishwasher. Anything that can go in the dishwasher makes my life so much easier.

I use this KitchenCraft MasterClass Non-Stick Baking Tray, 35 x 25 cm (14″ x 10″) for all my cookies, biscuits, scones. It’s a great size and comfortably holds all of these 9 scones so you don’t have to bake in batches. It’s non-stick so the scones lift off easily from the tray and doesn’t require any baking parchment or greasing.

It’s not easy to buy sweet rice flour in the UK, but it’s a flour I use all the time. It is possible to pick up sweet rice flour in chinatown but it is not certified gluten-free so for the coeliacs among us and those that have a very strong intolerance it is not ideal. But I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

Oat flour can be picked up at most health food shops and if I run out that’s where I head to. However, like all alternative flours it can be expensive so I find the most economical way is to buy it online. I go through bags of the stuff as it’s the flour I use most regularly so I like to buy in bulk. My favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4) at a reasonable price. Even better if you go the subscribe and save option.

I order my millet flour through Amazon like most of my flours and the brand I like the best is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Millet Flour 500 g (Pack of 4). It’s more economical to buy it this way and I love Bob’s Red Mill as it’s certified gluten-free.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

I use chia seeds a lot in chia seed pudding, in my granola bars, sprinkled in my porridge and in smoothies so I buy them in bulk. I like RealFoodSource Whole Natural Dark Chia Seeds 2kg (2 x 1kg bags) with FREE Chia Recipe Ebook. They are just reliably good.

Some of the links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy your flour using the link then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Gluten-Free Flours: An Introduction

text saying Gluten-Free Flours: how to start gluten-free baking, which flours to use and how to convert wheat recipes: fromthelarder.co.uk

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

Eccles Cakes are a traditional British tea time treat. Beautifully flaky gluten-free pastry bursting with fruit and spices.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

I have always made Eccles Cakes regularly, they are both my mum’s and Luke’s favourite teatime treat so if either of them are ever in need of spoiling or cheering up then there is no better place for me to start than by whipping them up a batch. I can never make too many, they always seems to disappear as quickly as I can produce them.

What are Eccles Cakes?

Eccles Cakes are more pastries than cakes really and have a history dating back three hundred years. They hail from the town of Eccles in the North of England and like a lot of traditional recipes are remarkably similar to the Banbury Cake and the Chorley Cake with little discernible difference.

It’s the Eccles Cake though that is the most familiar since its commercialisation in the 1970s means you can pick up a dry doughy sub-par version in a packet at most supermarkets. If these are the only versions you have tasted then you absolutely have to try your hand at making your own.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

How do you make Eccles Cakes?

As like most old recipes there is debate about how a real Eccles Cake should be constructed. To my mind they are best when they are made from flaky pastry, rather than puff, to encase a luscious filling of spiced juicy fruit.

Here we use currants and sultanas and also include a couple of tablespoons of Homemade Mixed Peel. If you don’t have any Homemade Mixed Peel knocking around the kitchen then you could obviously use shop-bought. However, a tablespoon of marmalade also gives a lovely citrus taste (since our family is not a fan of bought mixed peel).

The fruit is sprinkled with orange zest, cinnamon, mixed spice and nutmeg then held together with melted butter and sugar. Once the filling has rested for 1 hour you are ready to fill your Eccles Cakes. Once it has been tucked inside its pastry casing it is baked until golden brown with a sprinkling of crunchy demerara sugar on top.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

Really there is no substitute for the homemade Eccles Cake, in particular if you time it perfectly and can present your offerings straight out of the oven. The scent of spice as you bite in is intoxicating, the fruit oozing from within as the pastry flakes at the corners of your mouth. If you’re especially lucky the buttery filling might have made a bid for freedom outside of the pastry during the bake so the sugar has caramelised chewily around the opening.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

I think Eccles Cakes may have been one of the first recipes I cracked when I had my own kitchen many years ago and I have found over the years there is a definite knack to getting them absolutely perfect. Of course the game completely changed when I became gluten-free a few years ago and I had to find a new pastry to make my Eccles Cakes with.

Gluten-Free Flaky Pastry

I have tried a few gluten-free flaky pastry recipes but the one I have listed below is the closest to the real deal and comes courtesy of an adaptation of Alanna Taylor-Tobin’s Flaky Pie Dough in her book Alternative Baker. The list of ingredients is long but necessary and actually once you have measured it all out then it is just as easy to come together as the wheat version I made in days of yore.

The pastry rolls really well and is actually quite forgiving thanks to the inclusion of chia seeds which act a little bit like gluten in that it gives the pastry stretch so is more pliable when it comes to filling your pastry rounds with the fruit filling.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

How to assemble Eccles Cakes

  • The key to a successful Eccles Cake is to roll the pastry to a 3mm thickness which isn’t too thick or thin. I bought a special metal cutter for my Eccles Cakes which is 12cm in diameter and makes for a perfectly sized Eccles Cake.
  • The filling shouldn’t be too wet either. Let the filling rest for about an hour before using so it can be dry enough to scoop into the pastry without making it soggy.
  • Don’t overfill your Eccles Cake. Otherwise the pastry will break and the filling will spill out. Two teaspoons is plenty.
  • Pull the dampened edges of the pastry over the top of the filling to stick together. You don’t want the fruit to puncture the pastry.
  • If you have rolled the pastry a bit thin and it does break a little then simply grab a little excess pastry and patch it up.
  • To finish, you turn the little pastry ball over and roll it out a fraction with your rolling pin to flatten it into a beautiful round. Then slash the top a couple of times with a sharp knife so the steam has somewhere to escape. Brush with a little egg wash to give it a lovely golden hue and sprinkle over the demerara sugar before baking.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

When I asked Luke why he loves Eccles Cakes so much he waxed lyrically about how the filling is spread thinly and evenly between the buttery flaky layers of the pastry, so the treat is rich but light and not heavy like the way mince pies can be a little cloying. He’s so right but this is what also can make the Eccles Cake a little dangerous as eating more than one is very easy to do.

The best way to serve Eccles Cakes

The traditional way to serve an Eccles Cake is with a lovely wedge of Lancashire Cheese and if you’re lucky enough to take a table at St John’s Restaurant that is exactly how they serve it as part of their dessert menu. It’s the best of both worlds with the perfect balance between a cheese course and a pudding course.

Still if there happen to be Eccles Cakes in our kitchen at breakfast time then that’s how we eat them here.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

Would you like more traditional British tea time recipes?

Vinegar Cake {gluten-free}

Lemon Iced Stem Ginger Parkin {gluten-free,vegan}

Gluten-Free Scones with Quick Strawberry Jam and Clotted Cream

If you make these Eccles Cakes then please leave a comment below and/or give the recipe a rating. If you then go on to use this recipe as a launch pad for your own baking creation then I’d also love it if you’d share it and tag me on Instagram. It is so lovely for me to see your versions and variations of my recipes.

Gluten-Free Eccles Cakes

There is nothing more inviting than a freshly baked Eccles Cake, warm from the oven, the pastry beautifully flaky and the spiced plump fruit just short of bursting through its buttery trappings.
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time2 hrs 15 mins
Course: Afternoon Tea
Cuisine: British
Keyword: gluten-free eccles cake recipe, gluten-free eccles cakes
Servings: 14 Eccles Cakes
Calories: 272kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

Filling

  • 100 g unsalted butter
  • 120 g currants
  • 80 g sultanas
  • 50 g mixed peel preferably homemade*
  • 125 g demerara sugar + extra for sprinkling on top
  • Zest of ½ orange
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg

Gluten-free flaky pastry*

  • 80 g sweet white rice flour
  • 40 g oat flour + 4 tablespoons for rolling out the pastry
  • 35 g millet flour
  • 30 g cornflour
  • 15 g tapioca starch
  • 15 g ground chia seeds
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 115 g cold unsalted butter straight from the fridge
  • 1 egg medium, lightly beaten
  • 2-4 tablespoons cold whole milk
  • 2 egg yolks for glazing the Eccles Cakes
  • 2 teaspoons whole milk for glazing the Eccles Cakes

Instructions

  • First make the filling by melting the butter in a large saucepan over a low heat.
  • Once fully melted, pour in the rest of the filling ingredients, stirring thoroughly to make sure everything is coated in butter. Set aside for 1 hour and make the pastry in the meantime.
  • To make the pastry, combine the flours, chia seeds and salt into a large mixing bowl.
  • Grate the cold butter into the flour then gently mix together with your fingertips so the mixture turns quite shaggy.
  • Stir in the beaten egg with a fork.
  • Add the cold milk one tablespoon at a time and start to bring the dough together with a pastry scraper. It should start to form quite quickly. It should be slightly sticky to the touch.
  • Tip the dough onto the work surface and quickly bring the ball into a round ball with your hands. You don’t really need to work the pastry as there’s no gluten to activate.
  • Wrap the pastry ball in cling film and flatten it slightly to make it easier to roll out when ready.
  • Place in the fridge for an hour to chill.
  • When you are ready to assemble the Eccles Cakes pre-heat the oven to 170°C.
  • Take the pastry out from the fridge, remove the cling film then tear the pastry in half to make it easier to roll out. Use the extra oat flour to dust the worktop and the rolling pin.
  • Roll out the pastry to about 3mm thickness then cut out circles of pastry using a 12cm round pastry cutter.
  • Spoon in two teaspoons of filling into the centre of each round.
  • Whisk the egg yolks and whole milk together into a small cup.
  • Damp the edges of the pastry lightly with the egg yolk and milk mixture, then bring all the sides together, pressing firmly to seal.
  • Flip each Eccles cake over then gently roll out with the rolling pin to flatten slightly so the filling is just showing below the surface.
  • Set the Eccles Cakes onto a large baking tray, using a sharp knife make two little slits in the centre of each cake then brush each surface with the egg yolk and milk mixture and sprinkle with demerara sugar.
  • Bake for 15 minutes until golden.

Notes

*Pastry adapted from the Flaky Pie Dough recipe in Alanna Taylor Tobin's Alternative Baker
*As I am not a big fan of shop-bought mixed peel if I do not have any Homemade Mixed Peel to hand then I often add in a couple of tablespoons of orange marmalade instead of the mixed peel and also the zest of a lemon. I would then omit the orange zest.

Nutrition

Calories: 272kcal | Carbohydrates: 34g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 72mg | Sodium: 97mg | Potassium: 156mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 21g | Vitamin A: 8.9% | Vitamin C: 0.7% | Calcium: 3.3% | Iron: 4.9%

SHOP THE RECIPE

The recipe for the Flaky Pastry is adapted from Alanna Taylor Tobin’s Alternative Baker which is one of my favourite resources for gluten-free baking. I have tried a load of recipes from the book and they are all easy to follow and delicious. Like me Taylor Tobin doesn’t use a bunch of gums in her baking but relies on alternative flours to get the results she wants. This is rare for a gluten-free cookbook and since my body doesn’t react well to guar or xanthan gum then it means I can bake anything and everything from within its pages.

This Cookie cutter round 12cm s/s 1.5cm deep guaranteed quality is the cookie cutter I bought many years ago for my Eccles Cakes and it’s very simple but the perfect size and does exactly what I need it to.

I have finally found a brand of sweet rice flour which is 100% certified gluten-free. I have no idea why it’s so difficult to get in the UK but I use sweet rice flour a lot so this was a real find. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

The oat flour I always use is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4). I buy it in packs of four since I find oat flour invaluably useful in my gluten-free baking.

Millet flour is also needed for the gf pastry and my favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Millet Flour 500 g (Pack of 4) which as it states comes in a 4 x 500g pack but I prefer to buy my gluten-free flour in larger quantities like this as it’s just not as easy to get hold of as wheat flour and saves me having to wait when I have a specific baking urge. It also keeps costs down.

This post is not sponsored but the links above are affiliate links which means if you decide you want to click through to buy then Amazon gives me a small commission at no cost to you whatsoever. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

Honey Apple Spice Scones {gluten-free}

These gluten-free Honey Apple Spice Scones are not very sweet, making them the perfect match for lashings of homemade jam.

Honey Apple Spice Scones {gluten-free}

These scones are hitting all the right notes for me at the moment and are what I have been craving all week before I had even tried the recipe out.

Honey Apple Spice Scones {gluten-free}

I woke up with a bang this morning knowing I wanted scones for breakfast. Yes, that’s what I had been missing all week and as soon as I realised that laying in bed at 6am they were the only thing that could possibly satisfy me. I tried eating a piece of toast only to give most of it to Cole when it just didn’t feel right. So after I bundled him off to nursery, I came back home, raided my larder and fridge for the right ingredients and 30 minutes later was enjoying the scone (ahem scones) that I had been craving.

Honey Apple Spice Scones {gluten-free}

Do note that these are not sweet scones despite the fact that there is both apples and honey in the title. I would normally put about 60g of sugar in my scones but I just didn’t want that for my breakfast today so instead substituted the sugar with honey which tones down the sweetness of the scone immeasurably. The burst of dessert apple in every mouthful also keeps the scones from feeling too savoury but really what you want here is to ladle your scones with the very best homemade jam. I ate mine slathered in last week’s Damson Orange Cinnamon Jam and the combination of spices and deep rich autumnal flavour was perfect.

Honey Apple Spice Scones {gluten-free}

After I had eaten my fill of jammy scones I then attacked them with a generous slather of salted butter which was also excellent as the gentle spices and apples were given the chance to shine. I made the scones smaller than I normally would and just made a small batch of 12. I doubt they’ll last the day once a hungry husband and toddler come home but that’s all for the best as scones are only really worthwhile on the day they are baked.

Honey Apple Spice Scones {gluten-free}

Honey Apple Spice Scones {gluten-free}

These gluten-free Honey Apple Spice Scones are not very sweet, making them the perfect match for lashings of homemade jam.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Afternoon Tea
Cuisine: British
Keyword: gluten-free honey apple spice scones, gluten-free scone recipe, honey apple spice scones
Servings: 12 scones
Calories: 149kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 100 g sweet rice flour
  • 70 g oat flour
  • 55 g sorghum flour
  • 25 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 50 g cold unsalted butter sliced thinly
  • 4 tablespoons honey
  • 1 egg +1 for the egg wash
  • 100 ml whole milk
  • 1 dessert apple peeled, cored and cubed

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 180°C.
  • Sift the flours with the spices, baking powder and salt, then drop in the butter, rubbing together to form a breadcrumb texture.
  • In a jug whisk the eggs into the milk with the honey and pour into the flour mixture.
  • Stir together with a wooden spoon to bring together then turn out onto a clean work surface dusted with oat flour and using your hands gently turn the mixture round and round. As it is coming together sprinkle in the apple pieces bit by bit so they are evenly distributed. Carry on turning the dough a little longer until it forms a smooth dough which is no longer sticky.
  • Press the dough out into an even round 1 inch thick and cut out the scones using 5cm round cutter.
  • Place the scones on a large baking tray and brush the top of each scone lightly with whisked egg.
  • Bake for 10 minutes or until the top of the scones are beautifully golden.

Nutrition

Calories: 149kcal | Carbohydrates: 24g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 23mg | Sodium: 60mg | Potassium: 179mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 2.9% | Vitamin C: 0.8% | Calcium: 6.2% | Iron: 3.7%

SHOP THE RECIPE

Although the metal cookie cutters may look a bit more stylish I always use these KitchenCraft Double-Edged Plastic Biscuit/Pastry Cutters with Storage Box (Set of 7) – White. They are the perfect range of sizes, they are plastic so don’t rust and can go in the dishwasher. Anything that can go in the dishwasher makes my life so much easier.

I use this KitchenCraft MasterClass Non-Stick Baking Tray, 35 x 25 cm (14″ x 10″) for all my cookies, biscuits, scones. It’s non-stick so the scones lift off easily from the tray and doesn’t require any baking parchment or greasing.

It’s not easy to buy sweet rice flour in the UK, but it’s a flour I use all the time. It is possible to pick up sweet rice flour in chinatown but it is not certified gluten-free so for the coeliacs among us and those that have a very strong intolerance it is not ideal. But I have finally found a brand which is 100% certified gluten-free and it’s fantastic. The brand is yourhealthstore Premium Gluten Free Sweet Rice Flour (glutinous) 1kg

Oat flour can be picked up at most health food shops and if I run out that’s where I head to. However, like all alternative flours it can be expensive so I find the most economical way is to buy it online. I go through bags of the stuff as it’s the flour I use most regularly so I like to buy in bulk. My favourite brand is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Oat Flour 400 g (Pack of 4) at a reasonable price. Even better if you go the subscribe and save option.

I order my sorghum flour through Amazon like most of my flours and the brand I like the best is Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Whole Grain Sorghum Flour 500 g (Pack of 4). It’s more economical to buy it this way and I love Bob’s Red Mill as it’s certified gluten-free.

It’s not difficult to get hold of tapioca flour in the UK. You can often find 100g pots of Doves Farm Tapioca Flour in the supermarket but it’s quite costly and doesn’t give you very much. You can find more varied brands in health food shops in bags of about 500g. The cost depends entirely on the brand you purchase. My preferred brand is Bob’s Red Mill GF Tapioca Flour 500 g (Pack of 2) as it’s certifiably gluten-free and I order it through Amazon.

This is not a sponsored post by any of these brands or products. They are just what I love to use in my kitchen. Some of the links above are affiliate links so if you decide to buy any of these using the link then I will get a small commission from Amazon at no cost to you. To learn more about how the data processing works when using these Amazon affiliate links then please visit my privacy policy page.

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Strawberry Redcurrant Jam

A beautiful Strawberry Redcurrant Jam, for those that don’t like the strawberry jam too sweet the redcurrants add extra vibrancy and tartness.

I used to have a bit of a problem with jam. The sugar. I was never one for jam tarts or jammy toast, that was my sister. I would pucker up my nose and screw up my face as if it were poisoning me. Suffice to say I no longer do that. I know I’m not the only one who is getting a sweeter and sweeter tooth with age if my Nan’s shopping basket was anything to go by in her later years. It was just cake and sweets, Mum used to have to surreptitiously hide a packet of frozen peas amongst the bags of coconut mushrooms and custard tarts to ensure she at least had the option of health when she got home. However, despite the increasing dominance of sugar in my life, jam has still been a bit of a stumbling block for me.

I enjoy making jam. There is something extremely prudent about conserving the fruits of the season to have later on in the year. I am soothed by the preparation of the produce; washing, peeling and removing stalks and excited by the first boil as the produce slowly starts to break down to achieve intensity. I get an absurd amount of pleasure from pouring in a whole kilo of sugar, the hubble and bubble of the pot and then my fastidious side loves the careful decanting so the sticky jam doesn’t run riot all over the kitchen. I screw the top, test for set the next day, create labels, admire my industrious stack, then offload the whole lot come Christmas time. But I never really ate it myself.

So it was my mission to reduce the sugar content of my jams. Although I achieved some success with the kind of conserves you can eat straight from the jar, my Vanilla Peach Bourbon Jam and my Seedless Wild Blackberry Lime Jam, I was dismally failing when it came to the classic strawberry or raspberry jam. I have been canning the final jams which means you require less sugar, I have been cutting the sugar and adding lemons, limes, herbs, anything to counteract the sweetness. However, all these efforts have led to the same result, boiling and boiling and boiling away my jam as it refused to reach setting point. The end product would eventually work but I seemed to be losing too much fruit.

After a very disappointing time with some strawberry and lemon verbena jam, I was ready to give up jams earlier this summer. Then I had a piece of Victoria Sponge on our WI cake stall a few weeks ago. The intense sweetness was pleasurably sandwiched between two thick buttery vanilla doorstops and for me jam finally had a purpose again. Of course, you are not supposed to eat it by itself with a spoon. The jam needs to be sweet but then used in moderation to bring the best out of the other ingredients it is paired with. I certainly don’t begrudge those whom like to lather it on a crumpet or wodge it in an English muffin but for me, suddenly realising that I could have been using my jam in cakes and desserts has been a revelation. I never bothered using it before as I presumed I didn’t like it, but in the right context and without using the commercially produced stuff jam can be the key ingredient. It is supposed to be sweet, just go with it. Ever since then I’ve been able to see the joy in jam. It has been fully embraced into my life and my baking and my jams have never tasted better.

This has been my favourite strawberry jam adventure yet. These strawberries were just £4 for 2kg from the market and when I brought them home I remembered the redcurrants I had picked up a few weeks earlier which were now lounging around in my freezer drawer for a rainy day. These guys pair together beautifully, the sweet hit of the strawberry is tempered by the tart redcurrants and the ruby beauty as it smudges into the buttercream of the Victoria Sponge is terribly appealing.

Now, when I made this jam I figured I wanted something quick and lovely so I boiled the two fruits together from the off, fully rejecting my rule of de-seeding all jams. The strawberry seeds I don’t have a problem with but the redcurrants may have a little too much bite. I have since read recipes that recommend boiling up the redcurrants first and then sieving them which I think I would do next time. It would be more useful for me to research these recipes before I make 20 jars of the stuff, but ho hum I will not be told.

This recipe makes masses as I had an absolute glut of strawberries, so if you are making the jam just for yourself I would recommend halving the recipe, unless you like giving jam as presents which then makes us samies.

Strawberry Redcurrant Jam

A beautiful Strawberry Redcurrant Jam, for those that don't like the strawberry jam too sweet the redcurrants add extra vibrancy and tartness.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time1 hr
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: British
Keyword: strawberry redcurrant jam, strawberry redcurrant jam recipe
Servings: 80 servings
Calories: 31kcal
Author: Georgina Hartley

Ingredients

  • 1 kg strawberries
  • 500 g Redcurrants stalks removed
  • 1400 g jam sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon

Instructions

  • Remove the stalks from the redcurrants and then place them in a large preserving pan along with the strawberries and heat gently, bringing to a light boil.
  • When the fruit is boiling then stir in the sugar.
  • Once the sugar has dissolved then add the lemon juice.
  • Bring to a rolling boil, making sure to stir the bottom of the pan frequently so the fruit doesn’t stick.
  • Once the jam reaches 104°C or passes the saucer wrinkle test* then decant into sterilised jars*.

Notes

*The saucer wrinkle test basically requires you to put about 5 saucers in your freezer when you begin making your jam. Once you think the jam might be ready then you can double check by removing a saucer from the freezer, dropping a teaspoon of jam on it then placing the saucer in the fridge. After about 30 seconds remove the saucer and push the jam with your finger. If it wrinkles up it’s ready, if it just pools back into the space your finger has left then it needs more bubbling time. Boil it another couple of minutes then turn off the heat and then test again with another saucer.
*To sterilise the jars place the very clean jars you would like to use in an oven pre-heated to 140°C for 20 minutes. Sterilise the lids by dropping them into a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes with a splash of vinegar. I don’t sterilise my lids in the oven as they tend to ruin.
Yield 10 200ml jars

Nutrition

Calories: 31kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 48mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 0.1% | Vitamin C: 12% | Calcium: 0.6% | Iron: 1%

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Victoria Sandwich

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