Whisky Marmalade Bundt {gluten-free}

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Oh, I have needed this Whisky Marmalade Bundt this week, it’s certainly been one to test the spirits. Billy Buddy has gone and gotten himself injured yet again. It’s the third time I’ve been to the vets this year and I think we pretty much own a stake in our local practice. Billy Buddy is such an accident prone dog and this weekend it was the turn of his kneecap which he has either torn or strained. These ruddy squirrels have a lot to answer for.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

The poor thing is almost constantly on bed rest for various ailments, a torn cruciate ligament here, a removed meniscus there, perhaps a stomach pump for a swallowed box of ibuprofen for some extra drama.

Not that you would know he has metal pins holding his knee together as he still finds ample opportunity to tear around the house after Willow and sprint out into the back garden to terrorise planes flying overhead. I do try to keep him in his crate like the vet suggests but Cole has taken to taunting him by rattling the cage – why won’t you come out and play Billy Buddy, look I have a ball!

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Looking after a dog who refuses to believe he’s on bed rest coupled with a toddler who thinks biting me is the best form of communication has been a fun challenge to test the nerves this week. I have to admit, I have reached for the cake tin on more than one occasion.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Honestly there is no better way of getting a quick sugar fix so you know everything is going to be alright than with this excellent Whisky Marmalade Bundt. The generous amount of booze soaked sultanas studding the sponge don’t hurt either.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Thank goodness then that my supply of said bundt is neverending since it took me a good few weeks to perfect this recipe. The final version is everything I want a slice of cake to be, an ideal accompaniment for an afternoon tea break. I used my own Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade which has such a lovely depth of citrus flavour and makes a perfect match with the whisky sodden sultanas. The tangy marmalade caramel which is slathered over the finished bundt with abandon is the ultimate teatime indulgence. So naughty but so necessary. The cake is gluten-free as per usual and here I have used sweet rice flour, oat flour and millet flour to get the exact texture and background flavour I need.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

So, this week has been a tough old bird but hopefully Billy Buddy will be back on his feet chasing squirrels again soon, ready for his next injury, and I’m sure Cole won’t still be biting me when he’s a teenager, so there’s that to look forward to. No matter as in this house there is always cake.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Print Recipe
Whisky Marmalade Bundt {gluten-free}
This is a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from the whisky soaked sultanas and tangy from the marmalade.
This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
12 slices
Ingredients
  • 260 g sultanas
  • 200 g marmalade
  • 175 ml whisky
  • 200 g sweet white rice flour
  • 120 g oat flour
  • 120 g millet flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 280 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 100 g soft light brown sugar
  • 5 eggs
Marmalade Caramel
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 150 g marmalade
  • 4 tablespoons dark muscovado sugar
  • 4 tablespoons sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons whisky
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
12 slices
Ingredients
  • 260 g sultanas
  • 200 g marmalade
  • 175 ml whisky
  • 200 g sweet white rice flour
  • 120 g oat flour
  • 120 g millet flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 280 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 100 g soft light brown sugar
  • 5 eggs
Marmalade Caramel
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 150 g marmalade
  • 4 tablespoons dark muscovado sugar
  • 4 tablespoons sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons whisky
This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.
Instructions
  1. Put sultanas in a bowl with the marmalade and the whisky and leave to soak for 1 hour.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 170 °C and grease a 10 inch bundt tin.
  3. Whisk the flours together but remove 1 tablespoon of the flour and use to lightly dust inside the bundt tin, making sure to shake out the excess.
  4. Add the baking powder and salt to the remaining flours and whisk together again. Set aside.
  5. Cream together the butter and sugars on a low-medium setting of the food mixer until pale, light and fluffy.
  6. Add the eggs one at a time and keep mixing until well incorporate.
  7. Then add the 1/3 of the flour mix and beat in. Add half of the sultana/marmalade/whisky mixture and again beat in. Add the second third of the flour mix, beat, the rest of the sultana, mix, beat and then the final third of the flour mix.
  8. Once the batter is lovely and smooth, save for the lumpy sultanas, pour evenly into the bundt tin.
  9. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until an inserted cocktail stick comes out clean.
  10. Use a small palette knife to carefully work around the the bundt tin to loosen the cake, making sure to also loosen the middle of the cake too. Carefully turn the cake upside down onto a wire rack then make the caramel.
  11. For the caramel, melt the butter in a medium sized saucepan then add the marmalade and sugar and bring to a low boil, whisking until everything has dissoved. Boil for a couple of minutes then remove from the heat and stir in the sour cream.
  12. Pour over the warm bundt.
  13. Leave the cake to cool, then serve.

Favourite Gluten-Free Cakes

I can’t wait to showcase this new cake at my next cake stall at Tottenham Green Market on Sunday March 5th. I love sharing the recipes for all the cakes I sell and if you want to receive more of my cake stall recipes then I have a FREE mini e-book of the top 3 Favourite Gluten-Free Cakes which I sell including Fig, Almond and Salted Honey Cake, Peanut Butter and Jelly Cupcakes and Minted Brownies. The recipes are really special to me and if you want a copy of them then just click the button below!

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Scotch Whisky Caramel Shortbread Bars

 Scotch Whisky Caramel Shortbread Bars

The reason for tripping to Edinburgh this weekend past was to go to The Kitchin on our wedding anniversary.  My husband had fallen in love with Tom Kitchin’s cooking watching The Great British Menu years ago and had always longed to go and taste the real deal.  So this year, as it was a big anniversary, we packed off the cats to mums and the puppy to my in-laws (my mum definitely got the better end of the deal).  We had one unsettlingly quiet night at home without them before our flight making us realise how chaotic homelife has become since we began raising a zoo.

Our Scottish jaunt was put in slight jeopardy on the morning we left due to the worrying reports of torrential flooding and cancelled flights.  Impending doom did not deter us and although the December winds chilled us to the bone when we finally got there we felt the first snowflakes of the year kiss our noses as we soldiered up the steep climb to Edinburgh Castle.

The food was every bit as wonderful as we had hoped.  Kitchin resides by the water in Leith and was cosy respite from the weather.  The delicately imagined food was served by a friendly and knowledgable team who made us feel so at home even though the food was from another world.  Between us we had the game tasting menu and land and sea tasting menu, each were six courses.

I don’t like taking photographs in restaurants I’m afraid as I would never be able to do justice to the look and aroma of restaurant food thanks to dingy lighting which even the best filters on instagram couldn’t fix.  Plus when I go to restaurants I like the surprise of not knowing exactly what I’m getting.  That is also the joy of a tasting menu.  I don’t have to bother with the pesky business of choosing what to eat. As I’ve mentioned before I’m a lazy orderer and the chef always knows better than me what I should be eating.  Tom Kitchin was not wrong in this regard, roe deer carpaccio, pumpkin veloute with sautéed mallard heart and a jellied partridge consommé and Kitchin’s signature dish of razor clams were the stand out dishes.  The service was impeccable, the wine divine and the evening one to savour.

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Taking full advantage of the fact we were on holiday we crammed in as much good food as possible and we also splashed out at the seafood restaurant Ondine, just off the Royal Mile.  It must be one of the best meals I have had all year.  Amuse bouche of goujons were warm little breadcrumbed balls oozing creamy haddock, making you realise why restaurants still give us amuse bouche.  It’s not just pointless filler after all, instead, it was the kick off to an amazing meal.  We ate our weight in garlic buttered roasted seafood and a rich creamy fish stew bolstered by huge chunks of fish, scallops, mussels sprinkled with molten cheese and rouille.

We stayed in the Rutland Hotel for the three nights which has two restaurants attached to it.  The Huxley which is an informal affair slinging a variety of hotdogs and small plates.  The best dish I tasted there was the cauliflower and coriander fritter with beetroot houmous which greeted us an hour after our plane had touched down along with raspberry negronis.  The Rutland also offers a fancier alternative, Kyloe, a self titled gourmet steak restaurant with half a cow sticking out of the front of the building to really hammer the point home.  We had a wonderful lentil dip offered with our bread at the start of the meal, it was so nice to have something different than a bit of butter.  A starter of mussels drowning in cream and garlic was worth the visit alone.  Although the rib-eye steak was average, the thick cut beef dripping chips would knock the socks off any chip in the offering.

 

 

The other meal definitely worth a mention was a wind whippingly cold jaunt to the Saturday morning farmers market on Castle Terrace where wishes of pig in a poke were granted and then some.  Oink served soft white rolls smeared with haggis and stuffed with the most tender melting pulled pork, salty crisp crackling and topped with a fresh apple sauce.  Pulled pork rolls have become disappointing over the years but this has reawakened how indulgent they can be, the haggis adding real depth of flavour.

We rolled ourselves onto the plane on the way home laden with Edinburgh gin, haggis and tartan.  I abstained from bringing the omnipresent shortbread home with me, instead all I wanted to do was bake a batch, so I did as soon as I got home and added a little something extra.  These are like millionaire shortbreads but with the emphasis on the rich buttery biscuit rather than a thick caramel which can sometimes be a bit cloying.  Plus, whisky!  Lovely with a hot toddy.  Go on dip it, I dare you, and dream of a snow capped Edinburgh Castle.

Scotch Whisky Caramel Shortbread Bars

For the shortbread bars:
225g unsalted butter
100g caster sugar
½ tsp vanilla extract
250g plain flour
75g cornflour
A pinch of salt

For the whisky caramel:
125g caster sugar
150ml double cream
20g butter
2 tbsp scotch whisky
50g dark chocolate

  1. Preheat the oven to 180. Line and grease a 20cm square baking tin.
  2. Beat the butter and sugar together for a couple of minutes until fully incorporated.
  3. Add the vanilla extract, stir to combine.
  4. Sift together the plain flour, cornflour and salt then add to the butter and sugar. Beat until it starts to come together, then tip into the baking tin and press the dough into the tin.
  5. Bake for 20-30 mins until the top is just starting to turn golden.
  6. Leave to cool for an hour in the tin before removing and cutting into bars.
  7. Tip the caster sugar into a small saucepan and heat on a medium temperature until the sugar melts. Do not touch with a spoon but you can encourage the melting by swirling the actual saucepan around occasionally if you like.
  8. Once melted, carefully stir in the double cream and butter, the caramel may harden slightly but just keep on stirring the bubbly mixture until the cream, butter and sugar are smooth. Then add the whisky, stir in quickly and remove from the heat.
  9. Leave to cool slightly before drizzling over the shortbread bars.
  10. Melt the chocolate then drizzle immediately over the shortbread bars.