Whisky Marmalade Bundt {gluten-free}

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Oh, I have needed this Whisky Marmalade Bundt this week, it’s certainly been one to test the spirits. Billy Buddy has gone and gotten himself injured yet again. It’s the third time I’ve been to the vets this year and I think we pretty much own a stake in our local practice. Billy Buddy is such an accident prone dog and this weekend it was the turn of his kneecap which he has either torn or strained. These ruddy squirrels have a lot to answer for.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

The poor thing is almost constantly on bed rest for various ailments, a torn cruciate ligament here, a removed meniscus there, perhaps a stomach pump for a swallowed box of ibuprofen for some extra drama.

Not that you would know he has metal pins holding his knee together as he still finds ample opportunity to tear around the house after Willow and sprint out into the back garden to terrorise planes flying overhead. I do try to keep him in his crate like the vet suggests but Cole has taken to taunting him by rattling the cage – why won’t you come out and play Billy Buddy, look I have a ball!

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Looking after a dog who refuses to believe he’s on bed rest coupled with a toddler who thinks biting me is the best form of communication has been a fun challenge to test the nerves this week. I have to admit, I have reached for the cake tin on more than one occasion.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Honestly there is no better way of getting a quick sugar fix so you know everything is going to be alright than with this excellent Whisky Marmalade Bundt. The generous amount of booze soaked sultanas studding the sponge don’t hurt either.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Thank goodness then that my supply of said bundt is neverending since it took me a good few weeks to perfect this recipe. The final version is everything I want a slice of cake to be, an ideal accompaniment for an afternoon tea break. I used my own Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade which has such a lovely depth of citrus flavour and makes a perfect match with the whisky sodden sultanas. The tangy marmalade caramel which is slathered over the finished bundt with abandon is the ultimate teatime indulgence. So naughty but so necessary. The cake is gluten-free as per usual and here I have used sweet rice flour, oat flour and millet flour to get the exact texture and background flavour I need.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

So, this week has been a tough old bird but hopefully Billy Buddy will be back on his feet chasing squirrels again soon, ready for his next injury, and I’m sure Cole won’t still be biting me when he’s a teenager, so there’s that to look forward to. No matter as in this house there is always cake.

This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.

Print Recipe
Whisky Marmalade Bundt {gluten-free}
This is a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from the whisky soaked sultanas and tangy from the marmalade.
This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
12 slices
Ingredients
  • 260 g sultanas
  • 200 g marmalade
  • 175 ml whisky
  • 200 g sweet white rice flour
  • 120 g oat flour
  • 120 g millet flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 280 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 100 g soft light brown sugar
  • 5 eggs
Marmalade Caramel
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 150 g marmalade
  • 4 tablespoons dark muscovado sugar
  • 4 tablespoons sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons whisky
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
12 slices
Ingredients
  • 260 g sultanas
  • 200 g marmalade
  • 175 ml whisky
  • 200 g sweet white rice flour
  • 120 g oat flour
  • 120 g millet flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 280 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 100 g soft light brown sugar
  • 5 eggs
Marmalade Caramel
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 150 g marmalade
  • 4 tablespoons dark muscovado sugar
  • 4 tablespoons sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons whisky
This gluten-free Whisky Marmalade Bundt is such a deeply rich and warming cake, woodsy from whisky drenched sultanas and tangy from this year’s Seville orange marmalade.
Instructions
  1. Put sultanas in a bowl with the marmalade and the whisky and leave to soak for 1 hour.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 170 °C and grease a 10 inch bundt tin.
  3. Whisk the flours together but remove 1 tablespoon of the flour and use to lightly dust inside the bundt tin, making sure to shake out the excess.
  4. Add the baking powder and salt to the remaining flours and whisk together again. Set aside.
  5. Cream together the butter and sugars on a low-medium setting of the food mixer until pale, light and fluffy.
  6. Add the eggs one at a time and keep mixing until well incorporate.
  7. Then add the 1/3 of the flour mix and beat in. Add half of the sultana/marmalade/whisky mixture and again beat in. Add the second third of the flour mix, beat, the rest of the sultana, mix, beat and then the final third of the flour mix.
  8. Once the batter is lovely and smooth, save for the lumpy sultanas, pour evenly into the bundt tin.
  9. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until an inserted cocktail stick comes out clean.
  10. Use a small palette knife to carefully work around the the bundt tin to loosen the cake, making sure to also loosen the middle of the cake too. Carefully turn the cake upside down onto a wire rack then make the caramel.
  11. For the caramel, melt the butter in a medium sized saucepan then add the marmalade and sugar and bring to a low boil, whisking until everything has dissoved. Boil for a couple of minutes then remove from the heat and stir in the sour cream.
  12. Pour over the warm bundt.
  13. Leave the cake to cool, then serve.

Favourite Gluten-Free Cakes

I can’t wait to showcase this new cake at my next cake stall at Tottenham Green Market on Sunday March 5th. I love sharing the recipes for all the cakes I sell and if you want to receive more of my cake stall recipes then I have a FREE mini e-book of the top 3 Favourite Gluten-Free Cakes which I sell including Fig, Almond and Salted Honey Cake, Peanut Butter and Jelly Cupcakes and Minted Brownies. The recipes are really special to me and if you want a copy of them then just click the button below!

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Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness that can be spread on toast, sandwiched in cakes and devoured within a bacon roll. Don’t knock it ‘til you’ve tried it.

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

Alongside my cakes I also sell homemade preserves at the market stall and hands down marmalade is the preserve that is most requested. There is a bit more effort involved in marmalade which makes it harder to churn out than other jams. Plus the Seville orange season is so short that I usually sell out by the end of February but that is what makes it so deliciously elusive.

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

If you are a marmalade lover you simply must try making it yourself. It is the most satisfactory of jobs and definitely my favourite preserve to make. Do set aside a weekend for your torrid marmalade affair since you need to leave your pith and peel soaking overnight to soften. It’s a perfect job for these wintry days when even looking out the window chills you to the bone. No, instead, switch on a podcast, grab a kitchen stool and start juicing those oranges.

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

The two pieces of equipment which revolutionised my marmalade making was a decent juicer and an excellent knife. I have had many a juicer in my time but the one I currently use is the Mexican elbow which juices quickly, doesn’t take up much room in your kitchen and is easy to clean. I bought a lime, lemon and orange one before realising that the only one you really need is the orange one as it makes short shrift of all citrus, including the larger grapefruit. A good tip is to cut the fruit into quarters first so you can extract as much juice as possible.

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

For removing the pith from the peel of the orange you need a very sharp knife with a fine blade, otherwise the job is nigh on impossible. Japanese knives are excellent for this purpose as you need to run the knife between the pith and the peel at an almost horizontal angle so you can separate them.

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

I’m rarely content to just do a straightforward jam so I used grapefruit here where one would normally use lemons and rosemary because I am a herb ninja. I think grapefruit and Sevilles pair up beautifully, there is a sharper and more interesting edge to the marmalade when using grapefruit which I love. The earthy notes of the rosemary add a lovely profile against the fruiter elements and also look so beautiful in the jars.

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

So these past few weekends I’ve enjoyed being in severe marmalade mode stockpiling my jars for when I return to the stall in early March. It’s first come first serve guys!

This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness

Equipment used for marmalade:

Print Recipe
Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade
This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness.
This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 2.5 hours
Passive Time overnight
Servings
8x 190g jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg Seville oranges about 7
  • 1 grapefruit
  • 2 tablespoons very finely chopped rosemary leaves
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 1.2 kg granulated sugar
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 2.5 hours
Passive Time overnight
Servings
8x 190g jars
Ingredients
  • 1 kg Seville oranges about 7
  • 1 grapefruit
  • 2 tablespoons very finely chopped rosemary leaves
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 1.2 kg granulated sugar
This Seville Orange Grapefruit Rosemary Marmalade is a traditional marmalade, rich and slightly bitter with a zesty sweetness
Instructions
Day One
  1. First juice the oranges and the grapefruit. Place the juice into a preserving pan and reserve the pips, putting them in a separate bowl.
  2. Then taking the remains of the fruit, remove the pith and inner membrane using a very sharp knife at an almost horizontal angle cutting closely against the peel. Set the peel aside.
  3. Place all the pith, inner membrane and stray pulp on top of a large muslin cloth, bringing the cloth together and tying together with string to make a bag.
  4. Thinly slice all the peel.
  5. Place the sliced peel, rosemary and the muslin bag in the preserving pan with the juice and add the water.
  6. Leave everything to soak overnight.
Day Two
  1. The next day bring the pan to the boil. Then turn the heat down, put the lid on and simmer for 2 hours until the peel is soft.
  2. Remove the muslin bag from the preserving pan and squeeze the excess liquid which contains all the pectin from the muslin. Discard the bag.
  3. Measure all the liquid (without the peel) which should be about 1.5 litres, if not top up with water or reduce the liquid further and pour everything back into the preserving pan.
  4. At this point sterilise your jars and lids and place your saucers into the freezer for your setting test later.(see notes)
  5. Warm the sugar in oven at 140°C for 10 minutes.
  6. Stir the warm sugar into the marmalade liquid until dissolved and slowly heat to a rolling boil.
  7. Boil hard for fifteen minutes then start checking for the set using the saucer test.
  8. Once the marmalade is ready then remove from the heat, skim off the scum and decant into sterilised jars.
Recipe Notes
  1. The best way to sterilise your jars and lids is to place the jars in the oven at 140°C for 20 minutes. The lids should be sterilised by boiling in water (with a drop of vinegar to avoid the chalky residue) for 10 minutes.
  2. For the saucer test, place 5 saucers in the freezer. Then when it comes time to test, drop a teaspoon of marmalade on to one of the frozen saucers, then place the saucer in the fridge. After a minute remove the saucer and if the marmalade wrinkles when pushed with a fingertip then it has reached the right setting point. If not, try the test again in 5 minutes.