Mango Lime Pudding

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

This post is another update of an old post. This was the very last recipe I posted in my last weeks of pregnancy before having Cole and since my life had just turned upside down it was the one featured at the top of my home page for about four months before I felt able to get back to the blog. The old photos hold a particularly gruesome part of my heart as they were the worst ones I think I ever took so I have been keen to revisit this recipe for the past two years and give it the treatment it actually deserved. Below are the original words from back in May 2015 but the photos are resolutely new!

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

This is the easiest pudding in the world and that suits me perfectly. If I can whip this up in 10 minutes at eight and a half months pregnant without needing to have a nap half way through then this is a cinch for anyone.

I have been eating mangos by the crate load lately, I can’t get enough of their rich sweet intensity. However, this current craving has led me to realise how lazy I am with fruit. I’ve always thought that I just wasn’t a big fan unless my apples were baked into a pie or my plums were encased by clafoutis but I have realised that actually fruit by itself is quite nice by itself, only before a meal though, never in lieu of dessert, but this is only the case if someone else prepares it for me.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

I will joyfully make all my pastry from scratch, eschew a bottled pesto for a quick five minutes chucking things in the blender, churn my own ice cream and preserve the season’s offerings in vinegars, chutneys and jams but when it comes to fruit for solitary consumption I have absolutely no patience for preparation. Mangoes may only take a couple of minutes to slice out the stone, hedgehog the flesh before cutting it out into neat cubes but it’s a job I will always give to Luke if he’s anywhere in the vicinity. The same goes for melon, it’s the seeds I just can’t be doing with. To my shame I have thrown out untouched melons bought with the best of intentions that have been abandoned for weeks through sheer laziness.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

My aversion to peeling, de-seeding and chopping has culminated in my recent habit of buying pre-prepared fruit from the supermarket to snack on. It’s something I’m desperately ashamed of since it’s abominably expensive, lazy beyond belief and probably contains an array of preservatives that I don’t want to know about.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

The good thing to know then that the cutting up of the mango for this dessert is the most taxing it gets. So you just have to get past that first initial step and as long as you have a blender your trusty friend will do the rest of the work for you. Which is good when all you feel up to doing lately is having a good nap.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.

Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
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Mango Lime Pudding
An ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 3 mangos
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 150 g condensed milk
  • 250 ml extra thick double cream
  • 5 gelatin leaves
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
  • 3 mangos
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 150 g condensed milk
  • 250 ml extra thick double cream
  • 5 gelatin leaves
Mango Lime Pudding is an ideal way to end a meal, both rich and refreshing, but also incredibly quick and easy to make in advance.
Instructions
  1. First soak the gelatin by placing in a small bowl and just covering with cold water.
  2. Whilst the gelatin is soaking peel and de-stone the mango. You should have about 500g of mango flesh.
  3. Cube the mango and place in a blender with the lime juice, condensed milk and double cream. Blend until smooth.
  4. Set aside whilst you heat up the gelatin by squeezing it to remove the excess water and placing the leaves in a small saucepan. Heat on low until the gelatin has completed melted and then stir quickly and evenly into the mango pudding.
  5. Divide the pudding into six glasses then place in the fridge to set for at least a couple of hours or overnight.
  6. Serve the mango puddings with a dollop of extra thick double cream on top and a grating of lime zest.

Fennel and Chicory Salad with Mango Vinaigrette

Fennel and Chicory Salad with Mango Vinaigrette
Mango vinaigrette was the first salad dressing I really took note of. Before then I just thought that dressing was a bit of oil and vinegar and there you go. I was still at school and for a treat our form teacher invited the eight of us in her form for lunch after Saturday morning school at her house. Although I’m not sure how much of a treat we thought it was at the time. She meant well but I’m sure she regretted it instantly as we probably took great advantage of her hospitality being bratty teenagers. There is one residing memory I have of this lunch though and that is the homemade mango vinaigrette she served with the salad. The vibrancy of the fruit standing up to the mustardy undertones and tang of white wine vinegar has always resonated with me every time that I have re-created this dressing in my adulthood.

Mango Vinaigrette

Mango is to me a winter fruit. It’s this time of year that I make my mango chutney and lately I’ve been blitzing up the fruit to dash into sparkling water as an alternative to my sorely missed evening gin and tonics. The bright orange flesh and tropicality seem to stick two fingers up at the drizzly weather, bringing sunshine into my grey kitchen.

To use the mango as a dressing ingredient the salad must be comprised of bitter leaves to balance the sweetness. Fennel and Chicory are perfect as their firmness are not overwhelmed by the heavy dressing which might be a failure of a more droopy leaf.

Although I love the mango at the moment I make variations of this salad all year round. It pairs beautifully with a seared tuna steak, with shredded roasted pheasant and when the season comes around again I will probably make huge bowls of it for our summer barbecues.

Fennel and Chicory Salad with Mango Vinaigrette

Like any salad it’s quick to throw together, save a bit of chopping. It’s imperative, and I cannot stress this enough, that you take the time over the slicing of the veg so that the fennel, chicory and onion are as thin as humanly possible. I can get a little bit overbearing about this in the kitchen but it is important so that you do not render the raw fennel and chicory indigestible. The salad should be a joy to eat and if the vegetables are too thick then it could be a bit of a chore.

With most salads I dress them moments before it hits the table but with this one I feel it benefits from half an hour to let the dressing soften the vegetables.

Fennel and Chicory Salad with Mango Vinaigrette

Fennel and Chicory Salad with Mango Vinaigrette
Serves 4-6

1 fennel bulb
2 red chicory
1 red onion, peeled and halved
2 large handfuls rocket
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
½ teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons honey
1 mango, pureed (4 tablespoons needed)
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon water

  1. Slice the fennel, chicory and onion extremely finely then toss them together in a large salad bowl with the rocket.
  2. Pour in the white wine vinegar and salt and pepper into a screw-top jar then screw the lid back on and shake well until the salt has dissolved.
  3. Add the Dijon mustard into the jar and shake again until combined.
  4. Add the honey and shake once more until combined.
  5. Add the pureed mango and shake again. The mixture will be quite thick.
  6. Pour in the olive oil and shake well.
  7. Finally add the water to thin the dressing down a little and give a final good shake so everything has fully combined.
  8. Drizzle the dressing over the salad until all the leaves are just coated, you probably won’t need all of it, saving some for another day.

Mango Chutney

Mango Chutney
This is my first chutney of the year.  I managed to divest my laden larder with a good majority of pickles, jams and chutneys over the festive period but now it’s about the time where I start to build up my stores again.

If I am honest I made this chutney a few weeks ago when the calls of our local Fruit and Veg man hollering outside Finsbury Park asking us to ‘Taste the mango’ got the better of me.  I did want to taste the mango.  Then it reminded me how long it’s been since I had a good cheese and mango chutney sandwich.  Since I didn’t have any mangos in, I put the abundance of mangoes on the stall to good use and stirred up a very quick and fragrant chutney that afternoon.  I followed Diana Henry’s advice on mango chutney but did not carry through the hotness of her recipe, instead toning it down as I wanted to create something more subtle.

Cheese loves a good mellow chutney or jam; please see my earlier obsession with cheese and peach jam.  Mango chutney is a perfect partner and I particularly like a softly spiced version so that the delicate mango flavour isn’t powered out, bedding down nicely a good crumbly cheese.

Mango Chutney

This classic sandwich combination always reminds me of my mother who at the mere mention of mango chutney will without fail wax lyrical about a good mango chutney and cheese sandwich.  And with good reason, a generous dollop of sticky chutney oozing out a toasted sandwich filled with gooey English cheddar is truly a magnificent lunch and reminds me a lot of my childhood.

I don’t eat as many sandwiches as I used to but this doesn’t mean my chutney consumption has calmed down.  My current favourite use is to add a delicate amount to a salad of nutty emmental, cucumber and iceberg lettuce.  All you need then is a drizzle of olive oil and some salt and pepper to finish it off.  The mango chutney adds a lovely balance of sweet and sourness to this simple salad.

And of course, it would be remiss not to discuss how a lovely tablespoon of this chutney added to a homemade curry can provide its own dimension to the recipe, adding a mellowed sweetness to counteract your spicing.

Mango Chutney

Mango Chutney
Adapted from Diana Henry’s Very Hot Mango Chutney in ‘Salt Sugar Smoke’

6 mangos
¼ tsp cloves
8 cardamom pods, deshelled
1.5 tsp coriander seeds
4 black peppercorns
1 tsp black mustard seeds
500g onions, diced
500g granulated sugar
600ml cider vinegar
3 green chillies, deseeded
nutmeg
30g fresh ginger, diced finely
zest and juice of 2 limes

  • Peel the mangos and cut the flesh of the fruit from around the middle stone. Chop the fruit into cubes, there might not be much uniformity from the flesh cut close from the stone. Set aside.
  • In a large preserving pan toast the cloves, cardamom seeds, coriander seeds, black peppercorns and mustard seeds over a low heat for a minute or so to release their fragrance.
  • Add the diced onions, sugar, vinegar and chillies to the pan, bring to a gentle simmer and cook through for about 10 mins.
  • Add the mango, nutmeg, ginger and lime zest. Bring to a boil, then simmer for about 20 mins until the mixture is jam like.
  • Stir through the lime juice for the last couple of minutes of cooking, then decant into sterilised jars.
  • The chutney is best left for at least 4 weeks for the flavour to mature.