Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding {gluten-free}

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further in deliciousness by using teff flour instead of wheat flour.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the reason I am visiting old recipes and giving them the old gluten-free treatment. This pudding is positively invigorated by its re-invention. The teff flour used instead of plain wheat flour gives the sponge so much more complexity of flavour and compliments the spices wholeheartedly. There is no loss of texture either as the tapioca flour helps with the binding and ‘bounciness’ of the sponge.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

This is by far the best Sticky Toffee Pudding I have ever tasted. I have started making a version of it for the cake stall and it is a customer favourite.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

I originally posted this recipe using wheat flour on St Patrick’s Day three years ago. I think today’s Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is a far superior version so I’ve replaced it with this one and for posterity’s sake the words below are all from my original post in March 2014. Reading it made me a little wistful for the times where we did, as I mention below, nip to the local pub of an evening during the week for a glass of wine and supper to share our day’s news. A sleeping child upstairs scuppers this sort of carefree existence. A takeaway and an episode of Elementary is as good as it gets these days. Woe is us.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

“At your local pub you can rely on a few solid menu staples. Whether it’s sausage and mash, a chunky burger or steak and chips you know the kind of company you’ll be keeping with your pint. We are very lucky where we live in North London that we have two or three very good pubs which we can go to for a quick Saturday lunch, a slap up Sunday Roast or a mid-week life saver when we are both weary and want to sit down with a glass of wine and a quick supper to share our day’s news.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The sticky toffee pudding is one of the most prevalent stalwarts of the local English pub and can reliably be found propping up the odd Eton mess or lemon cheesecake on the dessert menu. Last week I steamed a traditional suet pudding, bringing a centuries old recipe to the table, but today I wanted to pay homage to a more current British classic. You would be forgiven, due to its ubiquity, for thinking that the sticky toffee pudding has been around since the Roman invasion. In fact it was only created in the 1970s by Francis Coulson to serve at The Sharrow Bay Country House Hotel in the Lake District. There is not much about this pudding I can tell you that you won’t already know; plump dates are added to a slightly spiced cake batter and drenched with a rich toffee sauce. I think you would be hard pressed to find any Englishman worth his salt who hasn’t partaken of the sticky toffee at the end of a hearty pub meal.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The only problem with our obsession with sticky toffee pudding is that it can be leaned on too much, with little room given to any other dessert options. Until recently I hadn’t bothered ordering a sticky toffee pudding for a few years, to say this particular pudding had been worn into the ground I had considered an understatement, especially since so many pubs serve a version which can only be described as subpar. I didn’t think there was much more this dessert could offer me and I was longing for a shake up of this national institution.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

However, last week I had a sticky toffee pudding at the Victoria Stakes at the bottom of Muswell Hill and it reminded me how comforting and homely it can be and immediately made me want to try my hand at home. This is always the sign that I have had a good meal.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

It’s St Patrick’s Day today so I wanted to Irish it up a bit. The Baileys is welcomed into this pudding like a long lost relative, giving even more creamy stickiness to the dates and as it peps up the toffee sauce it also removes some of the inherent sickliness. There is only one accompaniment to this pudding in my eyes and that is the best vanilla ice cream you can get hold of.”

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.

The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.
Print Recipe
Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding {gluten-free}
This British pub dessert is reinvigorated by Baileys which is baked into the sponge and also poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons.
The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
8-10 people
Ingredients
  • 225 g medjool dates stoned weight
  • 250 ml Baileys
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 175 g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 100 g teff flour
  • 50 g potato starch
  • 50 g white rice flour
  • 25 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • large pinch freshly grated nutmeg
For the Toffee Sauce:
  • 115 g unsalted butter
  • 75 g golden syrup
  • 40 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 140 ml double cream
  • 60 ml Baileys
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
8-10 people
Ingredients
  • 225 g medjool dates stoned weight
  • 250 ml Baileys
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 175 g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 100 g teff flour
  • 50 g potato starch
  • 50 g white rice flour
  • 25 g tapioca flour
  • teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • large pinch freshly grated nutmeg
For the Toffee Sauce:
  • 115 g unsalted butter
  • 75 g golden syrup
  • 40 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 140 ml double cream
  • 60 ml Baileys
The Baileys in this Sticky Toffee Baileys Pudding is the best way to reinvent the British pub dessert classic. Baileys is baked into the sponge and poured liberally into the toffee sauce for heavenly reasons. This gluten-free version also goes one step further by using teff flour instead of wheat flour adding a further complexity of flavour.
Instructions
  1. Place the dates, Baileys and vanilla extract in a blender and whizz up until it has formed a delicious paste.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C and grease and line a 20x20cm square cake tin.
  3. Beat the butter and sugar together until pale and creamy.
  4. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.
  5. Fold in the date mixture.
  6. Sift together the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and spices then fold into the rest of the ingredients.
  7. Pour the batter into the cake tin and bake for 35-40 minutes until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  8. To make the toffee sauce put the butter, golden syrup and muscovado sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a gentle boil, stirring occasionally. Simmer for about 3-4 minutes
  9. Turn the heat right down and pour in the cream and the Baileys. Stir through, then heat through for just a minute to take the sharp edge off the Baileys.
  10. Pour over the warm sticky toffee pudding and serve with the best vanilla ice cream.
Recipe Notes
  • Toffee Sauce adapted from Felicity Cloake’s How to Make the Perfect Sticky Toffee Pudding

Sticky Date and Banana Malt Loaf

Sticky Date and Banana Malt Loaf

This was one of those spur of the moment bakes where I had all the ingredients in the house, took 10 minutes or so deciding how I wanted to bake it and then dove in.

Date and Banana Malt Loaf

Granted, I have been meaning to bake a loaf cake for a while. A dense fruity slice of Soreen slathered with double the amount of butter than loaf was one of my husband’s childhood teatime favourites. I bought the malt extract about six months ago in a bit to recreate his childhood memories, but without all those obnoxious preservatives.Date and Banana Malt Loaf

I think what had been putting me off for so long was that all the recipes I had read told me I should be using yeast, meaning you have all that pesky rising time which I have to be in the mood for, probably why I have never excelled at being a bread baker. Then after further research, whilst procrastinating a trip to Sainsburys, I discovered some internet bakers disregarded this stumbling block and made their loaves with baking powder. No sooner had I stuck two fingers up at tradition then I was in the kitchen chopping dates and warming my malt extract.

Date and Banana Malt Loaf

Since I never got round to making the yeasted version I can’t in all honesty tell you what the difference was. All I know is that this version rose gloriously in the oven to produce a familiar dark treacly loaf, intense with fruit and made all the better with the requisite lashings of salted butter. Most of the dates melted into the loaf mix and the banana was really added in lieu of butter which I didn’t think it needed. The fruit notes are therefore subtle, adding more to the texture of the finished result than the occasional burst of sweetness that adding sultanas or raisins might have done.

Date and Banana Malt Loaf

Whatever you do, you must restrain yourself from tearing into the bread as soon as it comes out of the oven as it only reaches its optimum consistency once it has been wrapped in greaseproof paper and matured for a couple of days after the bake. The longer your leave it the moister the loaf.

The jury is out on whether this is a fruity bread or cake, although I suppose the lack of yeast definitely lends it more of a cakey vibe. But the special thing about this bake is that it fits the bill whether you are craving a sweet or salty mid-afternoon treat. After carefully guarding the loaf for the past two days, once my husband had caught whiff of its presence, it is now waiting happily in its greaseproof paper, getting even more moist and delicious, ready for its ultimate taste test later this evening. I don’t think anybody is going to be disappointed.

Date and Banana Malt Loaf

Sticky Date and Banana Malt Loaf

150ml milk
125ml freshly brewed hot tea
180g medjool dates
1 banana, mashed
70g malt extract + extra for brushing
70g black treacle
375g plain flour
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soft dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 egg
1 tablespoon demerara sugar

  1. Mix together the milk and hot tea and add the chopped dates. Set aside for 15 minutes.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 170°C and grease and line a 9 inch loaf tin.
  3. Pour the malt extract and the treacle into a small saucepan and heat until runny but no more.
  4. Turn off the heat then add the mashed banana and the soaked dates along with all of the liquid into the malt and treacle.
  5. In a large mixing bowl whisk together the flour, salt, dark brown sugar and baking powder
  6. Make a well in the centre and add the egg and the liquid ingredients.
  7. Bring the flour into the liquid ingredients then stir everything together well with a wooden spoon.
  8. Pour the batter into the baking tin, sprinkling the demerara sugar over the top. Bake the loaf for an hour, covering the top with foil half way through if it’s starting to over-brown on the top.
  9. When it’s ready, remove from the oven, turn out of the tin and cool on a wire rack.
  10. When the loaf is cold, brush the surface liberally with malt extract then wrap in greaseproof paper and foil and leave to mature for 2 days before eating so the loaf gets lovely and sticky.

Chocolate, Banana and Peanut Brittle Tiffin Cake

Chocolate Banana and Peanut Brittle Tiffin Cake
A tiffin cake is never something I go about sourcing ingredients for deliberately. For me, the tiffin is a method of finishing my half packets of biscuits which lie about my cupboards, or finally using the very aromatic bananas which are on their last legs in the fruit bowl. The leftover peanut brittle which I made for my crunchy nut cornflake choc ices also needs to go somewhere that isn’t directly into my stomach whilst I’m waiting for the kettle to boil. Then a few dates which have been languishing in a jar probably since Christmas but still moist enough to provide a good chew to the cake are also included.

Chocolate Banana and Peanut Brittle Tiffin Cake  |  Stroud Green Larder

However, do not throw ingredients into your tiffin willy nilly. The beauty of a throw together dish, whether it’s in baking or cooking a quick supper after work is knowing when you should leave something out. Just because I also had half a packet of marshmallows, some sweetened cranberries which are begging for a home and some pretzels which have been outright taunting me from their half eaten packet doesn’t mean they should all go in as well. Be selective and purposeful and then you will find that your cobbled together garbage cake assumes its own identity.

Chocolate Banana and Peanut Brittle Tiffin Cake  |  Stroud Green Larder

Due to the bananas the cake is much softer than a regular tiffin cake so be gentle when slicing. I used milk chocolate for the cake as that is what I had to hand but if I were to make it again I would probably go for half milk and half dark chocolate to add more intensity of flavour and reduce the sweetness. Usually I am an advocate with more is more when it comes to cake, but here, you want to be thinking less. Just a slither of the cake will be deliciously ample, if you over indulge you won’t be thanking me an hour later. This cake is richie rich.

Chocolate Banana and Peanut Brittle Tiffin Cake  |  Stroud Green Larder

Although the serving suggestion I most recommend is to place the cake in the freezer for a couple of hours; it will emerge as a deliciously cool easy to slice dessert which will happily pair with freshly picked raspberries after a long lazy Saturday barbecue.

Chocolate Banana and Peanut Brittle Tiffin Cake  |  Stroud Green Larder

Chocolate, Banana and Peanut Brittle Tiffin Cake

400g chocolate – milk or dark or a mixture of both
2 very ripe bananas, peeled and mashed
200g Lotus Biscoff Biscuits
175g peanut brittle, roughly chopped
50g dates, de-stoned and roughly chopped
A good pinch of sea salt

  1. Melt the chocolate in a large bain marie set over simmering water.
  2. Turn the heat off the water but do not take the chocolate off the bain marie, you want it kept smooth and melty whilst you are adding the other ingredients.
  3. Add the bananas first and mix in thoroughly to make sure they are well incorporated.
  4. Crush the Lotus Biscoff biscuits roughly with a rolling pin, so that some biscuits are obliterated and some are left quite lumpy to give the cake good texture. Then stir them in.
  5. Finally add in the peanut brittle, dates and the salt, mixing everything together so it’s all turned into a lovely chocolatey cake batter.
  6. Resist spooning the mixture into your mouth and pour into an 18cm, baking parchment lined, springform round cake tin. Smooth the top and cover with tin foil.
  7. Leave in the fridge overnight to set and chill before carefully removing from the cake tin and serving immediately. This is best served cold.